The Atlantis Thread

blessmycottonsocks

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I'm off to Madeira in 4 weeks.
At around 1,000 km West of the "Pillars of Hercules" and being a massif on a huge plain, which was still volcanically active up to around 7,000 years ago, Madeira is one of the top candidates for the historical Atlantis.
The accepted history is that Madeira has only been occupied since the first Portuguese colonists landed there around 1420.

A few YouTube videos (yeah I know!) claim there are far older structures on the island though. Indeed a quick scan of the largely unoccupied interior on Google maps reveals traces of circular or rectilinear shapes, which do look extremely old and which reminded me of round shapes on Salisbury Plain only visible from the air.

I will hire a car for a couple of days and will do my best to explore the interior. Watch out for my holiday pics!
 

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blessmycottonsocks

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Field trip to Madeira now sadly over.
A stunningly beautiful island and one of the nicest holidays I can recall.
We covered most of the island in our trusty little hired Fiat Punto*. Some very evocative pyramidal hills near Faial to the North East:

PSX_20191029_100106.jpg

One highlight of the trip for me was exploring the labyrinth of caves and lava tubes, known as Grutas de São Vicente. They were apparently formed during a huge volcanic eruption some 850,000 years ago. No sign of any prehistoric human occupation though:

PSX_20191029_100405.jpg

In fact, the only hard evidence of Atlantis I discovered, was this excellent (and quite pricey) local rosé wine:

PSX_20191029_095914.jpg

* Despite clocking up 200 or so km, much of it along narrow, rough and zig-zagging mountain roads, strewn with fallen rubble, the only puncture I got was in downtown Funchal. At home I drive a Jeep and tend to park in tight spaces by putting one huge wheel up on the kerb and then dropping down into place. Try that in a small-wheeled hatchback and wait for the hiss of a burst tyre!
 

ramonmercado

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More dubious Atlantis stuff.

Ashley Cowie published yet another crappy article this week trying to spin mystery out of discovery in the belief that ancient history needs to be sexed up with fakery and myths to attract the attention of the public. Today’s subject is Atlantis, which Cowie understands at about the Wikipedia level of research, citing as sources Atlantipedia and an article in National Geographic. It makes me wonder why I bother researching primary sources when, apparently, one can get paid to surf the web and summarize the results like a high school book report.

The long and short of it is that some Minoan artifacts were recently discovered on the islet of Chryssi, off Crete, and Cowie decided to label them “Atlantean treasure” to make them seem sexier.
By now many of you will be tapping your fingers briskly, thinking to yourselves “so where are the artifacts from the lost continent of Atlantis?” […] [A]ccording to Atlantipedia, many archaeologists support The Minoan Hypothesis, including K.T. Frost, a professor of history at Queen's University in Belfast; archaeologist Spyridon Marinatos, and seismologist A.G. Galanopoulos. Essentially, this theory points towards the island of Crete in the Mediterranean Sea as the inspiration for Atlantis…
At the end of the article he states that Minoan treasures are “maybe” Atlantean, though he makes no effort to support the claim beyond recycling the Minoan hypothesis, which is the actual subject of his article. As with so many of his pieces, there is a brief news peg followed by a lengthy rewrite of information easily obtained from a Google search, and then a mealy-mouthed conclusion that uses weasel words to avoid actually saying anything of substance, letting rhetorical questions and “maybe” stand in place of argument and analysis.

http://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/ashley-cowie-appropriates-minoan-archaeology-for-atlantis
 

blessmycottonsocks

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More dubious Atlantis stuff.

Ashley Cowie published yet another crappy article this week trying to spin mystery out of discovery in the belief that ancient history needs to be sexed up with fakery and myths to attract the attention of the public. Today’s subject is Atlantis, which Cowie understands at about the Wikipedia level of research, citing as sources Atlantipedia and an article in National Geographic. It makes me wonder why I bother researching primary sources when, apparently, one can get paid to surf the web and summarize the results like a high school book report.

The long and short of it is that some Minoan artifacts were recently discovered on the islet of Chryssi, off Crete, and Cowie decided to label them “Atlantean treasure” to make them seem sexier.
By now many of you will be tapping your fingers briskly, thinking to yourselves “so where are the artifacts from the lost continent of Atlantis?” […] [A]ccording to Atlantipedia, many archaeologists support The Minoan Hypothesis, including K.T. Frost, a professor of history at Queen's University in Belfast; archaeologist Spyridon Marinatos, and seismologist A.G. Galanopoulos. Essentially, this theory points towards the island of Crete in the Mediterranean Sea as the inspiration for Atlantis…
At the end of the article he states that Minoan treasures are “maybe” Atlantean, though he makes no effort to support the claim beyond recycling the Minoan hypothesis, which is the actual subject of his article. As with so many of his pieces, there is a brief news peg followed by a lengthy rewrite of information easily obtained from a Google search, and then a mealy-mouthed conclusion that uses weasel words to avoid actually saying anything of substance, letting rhetorical questions and “maybe” stand in place of argument and analysis.

http://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/ashley-cowie-appropriates-minoan-archaeology-for-atlantis
Not very convincing was it?

It's hard to avoid the fact that Plato unambiguously described the location of Atlantis as "in the great ocean to the west of the pillars of Hercules". This, coupled with the fact that the Azores plateau, possibly extending as far as Madeira and the Canary Isles, was far larger some 10,000 years ago, surely rules out The Mediterranean hypothesis.
 
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