The Contemporary Commercial Value Of Adolf Hitler

JamesWhitehead

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Some members of the Jewish community claim the proprietors know what Hitler’s name stands for.

“They had researched well, right from the clothes the dictator wore to his cufflinks. We had suggested a separate design, but the proprietors claimed that the name brings good business since its launch a week back."


They were consulted and had better cufflinks? :shock:
 

Heckler

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ramonmercado said:
Now a Hitler clothing store.
Have a read of the comments at the bottom of the article. :shock:
 

OneWingedBird

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I am so sick of the jews complaining about this, in the near future it will be jews ( no thanks to the zionists and their aggression) that will be hauled off to the new ICC for crimes against humanity. WWIII will see israel disappear off the map, now past power like the romans has allowed them to gain power because they know that they cannot be trusted and are always scheming.
Mmmmn, charming!
 

ramonmercado

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BlackRiverFalls said:
I am so sick of the jews complaining about this, in the near future it will be jews ( no thanks to the zionists and their aggression) that will be hauled off to the new ICC for crimes against humanity. WWIII will see israel disappear off the map, now past power like the romans has allowed them to gain power because they know that they cannot be trusted and are always scheming.
Mmmmn, charming!
OMG!
 

ramonmercado

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Now in Indonesia.

‘No Fan of Hitler’: Nazi-themed café in Indonesia causes worldwide outrage
http://rt.com/news/nazi-themed-cafe-indonesia-365/

Customers having dinner at the Soldatenkaffe "The Soldiers' Cafe" in Bandung. (AFP Photo / Adek Berry)Customers having dinner at the Soldatenkaffe "The Soldiers' Cafe" in Bandung. (AFP Photo / Adek Berry)

A Nazi-themed café in Indonesia has sparked rage across the globe – two years after it opened. While locals were mostly oblivious to the horrors of Nazism, the kitsch cafe was viewed as no laughing matter by Jewish communities the world over.

The café is named after a popular hangout for soldiers in Germany which was situated in Paris - the Soldaten Kaffee (“The Soldiers’ Café”), and opened in 2011.

That the service staff and guests dress as Nazi soldiers doesn't attract much attention from the locals: Indonesians by and large are largely unaware of Nazism and the country's Jewish population numbers some 20 people.

This picture shows the outside of the Soldatenkaffe "The Soldiers' Cafe" in Bandung. (AFP Photo / Adek Berry)This picture shows the outside of the Soldatenkaffe "The Soldiers' Cafe" in Bandung. (AFP Photo / Adek Berry)

However, the English-language Jakarta Globe has recently published an article on the café which sparked a global backlash, forcing local authorities to meet with the owner.

"I don't idolize Hitler, I simply adore the soldiers' paraphernalia," Mulyana, a Christian who likes playing with air rifles, told AFP.

Mulyana also stressed that his café attracted tourists, including Germans, with one photographed on its Facebook page wearing a red swastika T-shirt along with several Indonesians dressed in similar garb.

The café owner in fact collects Nazi paraphernalia, including a water canteen, bayonet, goggles and a lantern – all of which are on display at the café. The main decorations also include gas mask canisters and battle flags bearing swastikas, with German beer and schnitzel among the menu specialties.

Locals don’t seem to care about the gloomy legacy surrounding the café.

"We're living in Indonesia and Indonesians weren't tortured in the Holocaust, so we don't really care," mining company employee Arya Setya said while eating a plate of spaghetti at the cafe with his girlfriend.

Owner Henry Mulyana standing outside the Soldatenkaffe "The Soldiers' Cafe" in Bandung. (AFP Photo / Adek Berry)Owner Henry Mulyana standing outside the Soldatenkaffe "The Soldiers' Cafe" in Bandung. (AFP Photo / Adek Berry)

Once news of the cafe hit he English-speaking press, however, it triggered a stormy reaction from Jewish communities all over the world.

"The Simon Wiesenthal Center is reaching out to senior Indonesian diplomats to express on behalf of our 400,000 members and victims of the Nazi Holocaust our outrage and disgust," Rabbi Abraham Cooper, from the Los Angeles-based Jewish human rights group, stresses to AFP.

"We expect that all appropriate measures will be taken to close down this business celebrating a genocidal ideology that at its core denigrates people of color and all non-Aryans," he added.

The owner, in turn, stressed that he doesn’t deny the Holocaust, but is of the opinion that making the tragedy taboo is hypocrisy.

"If we want to speak up about humanity, why don't they stop wars in this world now, like in Afghanistan? War always claims so many lives," he said.

In the meantime, he plans to open another café in Bali, which attracts hordes of foreign tourists every year.

"I'll certainly display Hitler's image, as well as Winston Churchill's, and paraphernalia from American and Japanese soldiers from World War II," he said.

However, on Saturday, a few days after the first English-language article on the café was published, Mulyana announced he would shutter up his cafe– at least temporarily.

Inside the Soldatenkaffe "The Soldiers' Cafe" in Bandung. (AFP Photo / Adek Berry)
 

GNC

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You like to think it's an unfounded stereotype about Asians that they don't understand the Nazis, then you read things like this and wonder. You can't make sweeping statements, but blokes like the above aren't doing anyone any favours.
 

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Distance: that's all that changes the perspective.

Enough time and/or space away from a serious tragedy or horrific crime and the meaning can be wholly effaced and replaced.

David Mitchell did a funny piece about how 'rape & pillage' has taken a comic ring, and how the brutality of the Vikings has been mostly rehabilitated by the passage of time.
 

sherbetbizarre

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Did you know there used to be a Nazi themed restaurant in England?

Well not quite. It featured in an Italian Mondo from 1969 called NAKED ENGLAND... but you can bet it's one of the many staged scenes found in these productions, and probably filmed back in Roma.

You can see it in the trailer, two minutes in...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bmnE9wGhTW8
 

ramonmercado

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Nazi-themed café in Indonesia re-opens — keeping the swastikas and images of Hitler it pledged to remove

International condemnation forced owner to shut his café, but it has re-opened with many of the offensive items still intact, which are claimed to be for history buffs

A Nazi-themed café that was shut following after international protest at its décor has re-opened — still bearing quotations and paintings of Adolf Hitler, and staff in Nazi uniforms.

The SoldatenKaffee — named after a café in Paris popular with German soldiers during World War 2 — is in Bandung, Indonesia’s third-largest city. The café was closed last year after its owner received death threats, but they pledged to re-open it and remove the swastikas.

But when it was re-launched this weekend, men attended the opening in Nazi uniform and others posed as prisoners of war. The café does now feature some allied memorabilia, but the Nazi insignia and uniforms that prompted the protest remain.

Henry Mulyana, Indonesian owner of the reopened SoldatenKaffee in Bandung city, western Java island on June 21, 2014 speaks during the opening ceremony.

“All aspects of the SoldatenKaffee are legal,” owner Henry Mulyana told AFP. “We have a lot of customers from Europe and they don’t have a problem with the World War II theme, because it is seen here from a historical perspective,” he said.

A spokesman for the café’s owners said that it was interested in military history, not ideology or glorification.

The cafe's spokesman defended the business because it now displays a range of allied uniforms, alongside Nazi ones. A press conference — which featured historical discussion as well as an impassioned plea from the owners’ spokesman not to criticise the café — was held on Saturday ahead of the café’s re-opening with new owners. The spokesman highlighted that the café now featured uniforms worn by allied forces, though the conference was conducted under a large imperial eagle bearing a swastika.

“The main theme of this café is World War 2 military,” the spokesman said. “So not only WW2 German, as you can see allied forces on display too.”

The cafe's spokesman highlighted the allied uniforms on display, though it is still largely decorated with Nazi memorabilia. Source: Getty Images
SoldatenKaffee had been in business for three years before it gained the attention of the world’s media. Press reports were followed by fierce international condemnation, largely from Jewish organisations, and the café’s owner said that he had received death threats.

Authorities investigated the café after the reports, and then opted to shut it down in July 2013. ...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 54643.html
 

Ermintruder

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lordmongrove said:
Hitler Ice Cream
Mobile Hitler-advertised Ice Cream (apparently). Or, I suppose it might be right-wing extremist/white supremacist ice lollies.
 

Graylien

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I wonder if we've generally become a bit less touchy about seeing Hitler on things now we're in the era of Downfall memes and Kitlers?
 

Zeke Newbold

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This reminds me of something.

About...oh, maybe fifteen years ago, dear old `Private Eye`carried a picture in their Funny Old World feature. It was of a taxi companies' business card and had been sent in by a reader.

The card was from Africa - West Africa, I think, but can't recall where exactly. Anyway, there was a picture of a smiling black man with phone numbers etc. His name was...Adolf Hitler !

I've puzzled over this one ever since: it didn't look as though it were meant to be some kind of joke. (And if it were, what on earth would be the purpose ?)

The only sense I can make of it is that the man's parents had randomly borrowed a Western name without awareness of its implications (one does sometimes come across black Africans called things like Winston Churchill, and so on).

It is easy to forget that western Europe is something of a peninsula - with a lot of the world distanced from the events that took place there. Friends who have lived in China tell me that there Hitler is widely, and routinely, seen as a great man and great leader.
 

OneWingedBird

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I wonder if we've generally become a bit less touchy about seeing Hitler on things now we're in the era of Downfall memes and Kitlers?
Dunno, I'm always struck by the disappearance of the Adolf Hitler European Tour t-shirt that was popular in seaside shops fira 70s and 80s.

Most of the crude and/or satirical t-shirts have also gone.
 

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A friend earlier today posted a photo of a bus from a german bus company called Hütler.

As for other countries, a number of middle eastern countries seem to quite like Hitler. I shared an apartment with an iranian who described himself as a Hitler fan.
 
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Swifty

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This reminds me of something.

About...oh, maybe fifteen years ago, dear old `Private Eye`carried a picture in their Funny Old World feature. It was of a taxi companies' business card and had been sent in by a reader.

The card was from Africa - West Africa, I think, but can't recall where exactly. Anyway, there was a picture of a smiling black man with phone numbers etc. His name was...Adolf Hitler !

I've puzzled over this one ever since: it didn't look as though it were meant to be some kind of joke. (And if it were, what on earth would be the purpose ?)

The only sense I can make of it is that the man's parents had randomly borrowed a Western name without awareness of its implications (one does sometimes come across black Africans called things like Winston Churchill, and so on).

It is easy to forget that western Europe is something of a peninsula - with a lot of the world distanced from the events that took place there. Friends who have lived in China tell me that there Hitler is widely, and routinely, seen as a great man and great leader.
Yup .... I also remember seeing a picture of some black guy named Adolf Hitler years ago so you're not imagining it ... I don't remember him having a moustache though ..
 

GNC

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The African Hitler was reprinted in the FT at the time, which is where I saw it. The motto threatened something like "I am back in business..." Guess he wanted a memorable name.
 

GerdaWordyer

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As far as loathing, or even awareness of Nazis and Nazi symbolism goes--Here's my theory of Dads and Little Friends:
Many middle-aged-to-old people in Europe and the U.S. had dads who were quite endangered by WWII, what with bombs falling on their cities, if civilian, and, if in the forces, faced all sorts of horrors of war. And many of us loved our Dads.
Many middle aged-to-old people in Europe and the U.S. have Jewish friends. I'm 57 and I recall a friend, at 11 years old, discussing how nightmarish it was to know that Mengele had a special interest in camp kids who had blue eyes. I'm still friends with her and her eyes are blue, bright and beautiful. I can't imagine a child dealing with this even though it was second-hand knowledge to her.
These relationships are not so very common outside the Europe and the U.S., plus it's 70+ years on. I'm willing to let the rest of the world live, and hopefully learn.
As far as the swastika goes, wish it hadn't been hijacked by monsters.
 

AgProv

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Interesting story in FT 358 (Oct 2017) that relates here: a supermarket chain in Holland ordered, without checking the content, a supply of colouring books for children. Shortly afterwards they were plagued with complaints. The reason for this was that the colouring book, showing people who were historically famous and intended to teach children a little history had.... yes. A "colour by numbers" picture of Adolf, who was doing the Nazi salute. the supermarket withdrew the book from sale, and the Belgian publisher apologised profusely, saying the design work had been contracted out to India to save costs. A spokesman said

"I suspect the person who created the colouring pictures took a book about famous people and selected a few, amongst whom, unfortunately, was Adolf Hitler. Maybe he didn't know who he was".

Attributed to De Telegraaf, Het Parool, and NRC Handlesblad (TV station?) and dated 5th April 2017.

Meisjie Kira Vervloed and her father, who bought the colouring book: Ray Vervloed (R) and his daughter Kira pose with a colouring book with an image of Adolf Hitler bought at the Dutch store Kruidvat in Pijnacker, the Netherlands, on April 5, 2017. Kruidvat stopped selling the colouring book for children after Vervloed discovered the image. EDIT - got lots of pictures but they all seemed to be copyright to photoagencies demanding up to €350 to use them.... had a feeling I'd be really popular with site admin if I linked any! This BBC report seems to be OK to re-post, though...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-39514166
 
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EnolaGaia

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... the Belgian publisher apologised profusely, saying the design work had been contracted out to India to save costs. A spokesman said
"I suspect the person who created the colouring pictures took a book about famous people and selected a few, amongst whom, unfortunately, was Adolf Hitler. Maybe he didn't know who he was". ...
If the Belgian publisher was lazy enough to outsource the selection of figures to be included, I strongly suspect the Indian subcontractor picked people from Michael Hart's 1978 The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History. Given the criteria for inclusion ("influential" doesn't mean "good") Hitler and Stalin are among the listed folks.
 

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I suspect it's rather like the Hitler Ice-Cream thing: India's history with Germany in the 20th century would have been a remote one and while technically it was at war with Germany, that was at the behest of British colonial masters. The Indian Army did send a few divisions to North Africa but would have done most of its fighting against the Italians (Indian troops were the bulk of the Commonwealth army that kicked the Italians out of Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea - easiest to get the necessary invasion force from India, as it was nearer than Britain to East Africa). While some Indian troops went on to fight the Germans in Italy, the opening of the Japanese war made it necessary to scale back Indian involvement in Europe as its Army was needed nearest home. I'd guess Hitler as an enemy and the reasons for a war with Germany hardly registered and it was all going on at the other side of the world anyway - too remote. But Japan... I'm wondering how well a Hirohito Ice Cream might play out in India!

That remoteness of the European war and the fact German agression barely touched India - might well explain why images of Hitler are no big thing and why somebody with a sketchy knowledge of wider world history might have thought "Adolf Hitler. Famous man, led his country, like Churchill or Rooseveldt. We'll use his image for our product."
 
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AgProv

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Oh, and Hitler also offered to liberate India once the British were defeated, and to prove his good intentions, he started to raise an India Freikorps (later attached to the SS) from Indian prisoners of war captured in various British defeats. Given that the Japanese did the same things and raised their own Indian Army from ex-prisoners who wanted to change sides and fight the British - and that those Indians in Japanese service, when recaptured, were shot or hanged by the British and in some quarters are seen as Heroes of Independence - would this get Hitler a degree of sympathy in India? A better PR, at any rate.
 

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And that those Indians in Japanese service, when recaptured, were shot or hanged by the British and in some quarters are seen as Heroes of Independence...
Nice story.

Facts however disagree.

Yes, some captured were court-martialled and executed. This did not constitute anything like a majority. Notably, in many cases, it was the loyal Indian soldiers themselves who had to be prevented from killing their erstwhile comrades instead of accepting their surrender. Slim was forced to issue a direct order to XIV Army that INA members be taken as prisoners of war and not shot.

Elsewhere:

First, most INA members were arrested and brought before legally constitued courts, military in the first instance, but public at the conclusion of the war.

Second, in this latter case, even those found guilty of the most serious crimes (torture and murder) were sentenced to deportation (not execution), and the majority of the sentences were never carried out owing to political pressure from Congress, the Muslim League and the spectre and actual appearance of mob violence. The very small number who did receive capital punishment were those found guilty of espionage and sabotage; this was the standard pretty much worldwide for spying during wartime.

Third, ultimately, most former INA soldiers returned to their former units after a period of rehabilitation. Of those who were punished, the most common penalty was loss of pay and benefits and removal from the army, not death or even significant imprisonment.

Fourth, over 90% of those held in India had been released from jail within three months of the end of the war. The only lasting effect of their mutiny was a prohibition against serving in the post-independence Indian Army.
 

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Last year I was looking at some JFK memorabilia for sale online, autographs, letters, personal items etc and was surprised during my search to find a great number of personal items of Hitler's for sale. There were original sketches, his books with annotations, numerous letters, letterheads and a surprising number of teaspoons from his personal collection (these were selling for 300-400 U.S each.
 
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