The Continuing Insult To The English Language

Mungoman

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I do concede, the other two (tweets) are maybe a bit too propitious.

Which maybe brings me to the little matter of 'maybe'. To me, there is more than a nuanced difference between the word "maybe", and the phrase "may be". But a substantial contingent of Anglophonians seem determined to ensure that the wrong variation is used wherever and whenever possible.

I assume (with a high degree of depressed confidence) that the Venn diagram ring of suspects charged with the above crime would also be complicit in the constant conflict between using (correctly) the word "everyday" and the phrase "every day".

Citizens and copywriters alike just seem totally-oblivious to the difference, and it bugs me to beyond the point of distraction. Surely this isn't hard? Am I in a parallel universe? Pinch me, and I'll wake-up from this ungrammatical hell....
  • 'everyday' means commonplace, routine, predictable, ordinary, unremitting. It can clearly connote drudgery.
  • 'every day' means consecutively, sequential, a simple neutral statement of predicted instancy. It does not imply predictability- it states seriality.
(@Mungoman I totally get it that language evolves (and that English is far too widespread a tongue to control or constrain).... but there are some basic rules, which deserve defending....'sayin?)

  • Lose and loose. Nobody in the world apart from me hears or sees any difference (or, indeed, as I've been corrected in the past, 'diffrance') between these two meanings. Which to me is weird (as opposed to wierd)

I feel I'm definitely right about this, so I defiantly-define what I'm writing about. Defa-netly.

And that's whether the weather is fare or fowl.

I dont make the ruse in this gain. If peepole jus won two suite thenself then weer al doom

I agree completely Ermintruder. I start swearing though when it changes overnight, as in deadly, as in filthy, as in gay, and as in gay.

Enough I say!
 

Gizmos Mama

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Maybe, just maybe, if they had an insight into where the word has been, and its travels to this present day and time, they would show it its due respect.
I think many of the mistakes people make nowadays in speaking/writing and general use of the language, stem from exactly this. Change tack is an excellent example. Nobody knows that is a sailing term for turning the boat, usually so you didn't run into something, (like land), or so you didn't go way off course. People (the vast majority, it seems) these days, are so far removed from the days of sail, they have no idea the root meaning of the phrase. Hell, the vast majority can't read a paper map anymore!

Thinking about that fact makes me laugh! There are probably millions of people who, as they drift off to sleep, think to themselves, "Why change tack? Did it fall out of the cork board? Is the pin bent?"

The same can be said for all the Latin based words we all use, per se, etc, etc. (though I never was taught Latin, I've read enough to have figured out the most common root words.

They have also apparently have never read, (or read, and didn't understand) these word/phrases in a context that lets the light bulb come on.

An interesting study I read somewhere, which I can't find again, that found a correlation between vocabulary and mental health. The conclusion was that people with a poor grasp of language struggle to express themselves, but also may have a more difficult time actually discerning and defining reality. It seems some of our deep cognitive abilities may be strongly linked with our ability to "put it into words", and thus define to ourselves what is "real".

And is anyone going to mention the awful 'you've got another thinG coming'?
:oops:
And here I am, calling the kettle black! I had no idea the original saying was another think coming!

Over here, "You've got another thing coming" seems to have a similar meaning. It means, basically, "that's a bad idea", "you are sorely mistaken" or "you are not going to achieve the outcome you are hoping for".
 

catseye

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An interesting study I read somewhere, which I can't find again, that found a correlation between vocabulary and mental health. The conclusion was that people with a poor grasp of language struggle to express themselves, but also may have a more difficult time actually discerning and defining reality. It seems some of our deep cognitive abilities may be strongly linked with our ability to "put it into words", and thus define to ourselves what is "real".
.
Sorry but I have to disagree with this point. Many many of the authors I know (and I think we can agree that being an author requires a fair to middling, at worst, knowledge of vocab) have episodes of quite poor mental health.

They are more than capable of putting into words what is wrong with them, but that doesn't help stop it.
 

amyasleigh

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If a Yank wishes to push me beyond vein-throbbing, and witness wisps of steam emanating from my shell-likes, he could use a phrase that USAnians have corrupted into meaning the exact opposite of its true intent: “l could care less [about X].”

Aaaaargh!

maximus otter
Coming in some days late on this one (and maybe, having time on my hands) -- I find that " ' I couldn't ', versus ' I could '... care less", has been debated much on the Net in recent years, with a considerable assortment of opinions on it, being aired. There are those like you, whom it infuriates; and there is the view that "it's counter to strict logical sense, but it is kind of expressive"; and the different view that in fact it does convey in its way, very much the same intent as the "couldn't version" -- i.e. "I suppose I could care less about this matter -- but only a very tiny little bit less than I actually do care about it, i.e. just fractionally more than nothing at all".

Being British and having heard, and said, "couldn't care less", -- and nothing else -- for the great majority of my life: I'm not now about to start using the "could" variant, other than very occasionally if trying, humorously, to sound American. I however admit to finding myself entertaining the feeling, that this is an Americanism which I rather like. I find that it has a better contemptuous, dismissive "bite" to it, than the "couldn't" version has. Concerning its being nonsensical and a corruption into opposite meaning -- or in fact after all making sense, per, as above, "I could care [an extremely small bit] less" -- I find myself not bothered: colloquial language is often much more about being vivid, than about being logical and sense-making.
 

Yithian

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Being British and having heard, and said, "couldn't care less", -- and nothing else -- for the great majority of my life: I'm not now about to start using the "could" variant, other than very occasionally if trying, humorously, to sound American. I however admit to finding myself entertaining the feeling, that this is an Americanism which I rather like.
*Yith steps forward bearing a silver tray upon which lies a double brandy and a loaded revolver*

Think of your family.
 

EnolaGaia

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The full expression goes 'If you think THAt you've got another think coming!'
It was already current when I was a child 50-odd years ago.
The phrase 'another think coming' is actually older than both our ages combined.

The exact origins of another think coming are mysterious, but it appears to be an Americanism, and it does predate another thing coming in the sense expressing disagreement. It goes back at least a century. Here are a few old examples:

  • Having elected him republicans think they have some voice in the distribution of the spoils and there is where they have another think coming to them. [The Daily Argus (1897)]
  • Those who thought taxes high in the past will have another think coming in the future. [Clinton Mirror (1907)]
SOURCE: http://grammarist.com/usage/another-think-coming/
 

INT21

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...Change tack is an excellent example. Nobody knows that is a sailing term for turning the boat, usually so you didn't run into something, (like land), or so you didn't go way off course...

Belay that, sailor. Maybe not so.

I understand that the comes from 'tacking into the wind'. Necessary because a sailing ship can't sail directly into the wind.
So it 'tacks' at and angle to the headwind for a while, then 'changes tack' to put the wind on the other quarter and still maintain it's forward direction.

Way hey, blow the man down.

INT21
 

INT21

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Escargot,

...The full expression goes 'If you think THAt you've got another think coming!'...

Maybe it's a regional thing, but here we would say The full expression goes 'If you think That you've got another thought coming!'

INT21
 

escargot

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Escargot,

...The full expression goes 'If you think THAt you've got another think coming!'...

Maybe it's a regional thing, but here we would say The full expression goes 'If you think That you've got another thought coming!'

INT21
Nah, the point is to trivialise the other person's grasp of logic by pretending they perform individual childish 'thinks' instead of proper adult thoughts.
 

Yithian

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A 'think' here is not synonymous with 'a thought'.

It means a session of thinking/thought, as in 'Let's have a think about it.' or 'You give it a think.'

The retranslation is something like "If you actually believe that is right, you have another period of consideration due."
 

EnolaGaia

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A 'think' here is not synonymous with 'a thought'.
It means a session of thinking/thought, as in 'Let's have a think about it.' or 'You give it a think.'
I totally agree with you on the distinction between 'think-as-an-act' (of deliberation; consideration) versus 'think-as-a-thing' (a thought; opinion; conclusion).


The retranslation is something like "If you actually believe that is right, you have another period of consideration due."
Now that I've had another think come on the subject of another think coming, it strikes me that I've heard (and used) the phrase to connote two distinguishable spins on why and when such additional consideration is due.

This was triggered by a perceived difference between the earliest documented examples I cited in a prior post and the Oxford Dictionaries site's emphasis on 'disagreement' in its treatment of the phrase (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/think).

The earliest examples don't necessarily insinuate the believer is wrong / mistaken, but merely submit that the given conclusion / opinion will inevitably be revisited in light of eventual circumstances. To illustrate based on Yith's rephrasing ...

"If you actually believe that to be the case, you will be unavoidably confronted by a need to reconsider that belief in the future."

It's more common nowadays for the phrase to insinuate the believer is already wrong / mistaken, and it would be wise to double-check the conclusion / opinion. In this sense, the phrase carries the same implicit challenge as popular use of the game show catchphrase "Is that your final answer?" - especially in the extended sense of including an implied threat of being made to look unintelligent or foolish.[/QUOTE]
 
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Yithian

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Just read the following by a U.S. senator:

"I'm going to go back to my office and write a floor statement that is more fulsome."

This made me grimace in consternation. It's pretty well understood that although the origin of the word denoted abundance, it has come to mean gratingly excesive, which would be an odd thing to want your own statement to be.
 

escargot

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I totally agree with you on the distinction between 'think-as-an-act' (of deliberation; consideration) versus 'think-as-a-thing' (a thought; opinion; conclusion).




Now that I've had another think come on the subject of another think coming, it strikes me that I've heard (and used) the phrase to connote two distinguishable spins on why and when such additional consideration is due.

This was triggered by a perceived difference between the earliest documented examples I cited in a prior post and the Oxford Dictionaries site's emphasis on 'disagreement' in its treatment of the phrase (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/think).

The earliest examples don't necessarily insinuate the believer is wrong / mistaken, but merely submit that the given conclusion / opinion will inevitably be revisited in light of eventual circumstances. To illustrate based on Yith's rephrasing ...

"If you actually believe that to be the case, you will be unavoidably confronted by a need to reconsider that belief in the future."

It's more common nowadays for the phrase to insinuate the believer is already wrong / mistaken, and it would be wise to double-check the conclusion / opinion. In this sense, the phrase carries the same implicit challenge as popular use of the game show catchphrase "Is that your final answer?" - especially in the extended sense of including an implied threat of being made to look unintelligent or foolish.
However, one of my own favourite phrases is 'I'll have a think about that!' which means I'm going to come up with some serious ideas.
 
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INT21

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..which means I'm going to come up with some serious ideas...

And did you ever have one ? A serious idea ?

INT21
 

Swifty

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Just read the following by a U.S. senator:

"I'm going to go back to my office and write a floor statement that is more fulsome."
Shouldn't the senator have written "I'm going back to my office to write a fulsome floor statement" if he's using English?.
 
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