The Continuing Insult To The English Language

hunck

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
3,832
Likes
4,260
Points
159
Location
Hobbs End
"Pop-up shops".... what on earth do these words really mean, in the context of these weird non-establishments?
They're temporary - there's lots of empty shops all over the place. Presumably they're short-term leases to at least get some rent for landlords for a while rather than nothing. They also give a chance for people to try their business idea without committing to a long lease. They're associated with hipsterism which may be what's rubbing you up the wrong way.

Can't say I've ever been to one though.
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
24,870
Likes
23,654
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
"Pop-up shops".... what on earth do these words really mean, in the context of these weird non-establishments?
Seen today, inside a department store, giving away generous beer samples (and selling it). I presume they rented the space for this promotion.

No complaints from me!

SmartSelect_20190512-230804_Gallery.jpg

(Also selling tents and camping gear...)
 

Zeke Newbold

Carbon based biped.
Joined
Apr 18, 2015
Messages
748
Likes
1,183
Points
134
I've started to notice the use of the word `relatable`. The word (presumably intended as an adjective form of `to relate to`) is being employed in the sense of `I/we can easily relate to that'.Formerly we might have said:`Such and such makes them more sympathetic` but now we have this new word which can be slotted easilier into sentences.

Thus statements like: `Many find Britney Spears's struggle with mental health issues to be quite relatable`. (I made that one up but it might as well be true).

No doubt some time-rich smartass out there will give me chapter and verse on how this word has long existed blah de blah - but it seems to have come into prominence a lot lately.

And that might tell us something about the kind of age we're living in. Just as the term `wimp` came into wide use in the early Eighties, `relatable` seems to be the key word of the twenty teens - and it's a term of approval. A politician, for example, can go no better than be `relatable`.

In times past - and I mean the recent past - we didn't demand that our public figures need be so cuddly and apparently similar to us - except perhaps unless they were pop stars, comedians or actors and so on. Politicians were judged on their integrity and intentions not by the holding up of pints in pubs.

So what is going on then? Discuss amongst yourselves.
 

Ermintruder

Existential pixelfixer
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,131
Likes
6,503
Points
284
A pop-up shop is when someone opens a shop for just a month or so
But is your purchase more...tangible, than if you buy something from a car-boot/yard sale? (Or from a jumble sale, a Bringlish institution that may have been killed stone dead by Ebay).

It literally seems to be a "here today, possibly not gone tomorrow" type of trading.

The implication is that there will be no warranties / guarantees / promises, but that there should be some level of assured expectation, above and beyond just a one-off purchase from a random punter on Craigslist or Gumtree.

I do >not< get the impression that these sorts of "pop-ups" are entirely-unauthorised. Somebody has taken cash to allow them to trade. And that's their USP. They feel legit, moreso than a dodgy geezer in a pub with an armful of rusty Rolex.

Does the term work elsewise? Can I create a pop-up e-commerce website say just for a month, then disappear as a ¥millionaire?

Or could we have pop-up icecream vans, which instead of slowly sliding along streets melodically searching for sugar-suckers, they could rest their wheels awhile, and sit on bricks just outside your local mall?

The only things I want to 'pop-up' are storybooks, toast, and fireworks.

To me, the term is in danger of becoming a shorthand for unincorporated indeterminate paraconsumerism.

It's the Uber of commercial trading, coming to fill a gap in the High Street near you. "Yep, we close for lunch, and then forever. But when we say forever, just under this current name and location"
 

brownmane

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
396
Likes
709
Points
93
Location
Ontario, Canada
I love language. Not that I understand every grammar rule or what not.
A recent turn of phrase that is irritating me is people (particularly when I'm watching current events tv) explaining that blah blah blah "than ever before". Really? I think "than ever" is quite adequate.
 

Ladyloafer

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Feb 21, 2019
Messages
311
Likes
581
Points
93
A pop-up shop is when someone opens a shop for just a month or so. Often to sell some surplus stuff.
Whoever owns my local shopping centre has been giving out empty units (and there are many) to free-to -use-pop-ups.

There's a pop up playroom for the little uns, a peculiarly popular pop up ping pong parlour, and a pop up trampoline room (those little exercise trampolines).

It's all very odd
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
Staff member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
8,918
Likes
9,036
Points
279
The St Enoch Centre in Glasgow has an unstaffed drop in for autistics (and others who like it!) on a similar basis. :) I've gone in on several occasions, met new people and bumped into people I know already :)
 

Mungoman

Mostly harmless...
Joined
Feb 25, 2010
Messages
2,264
Likes
3,470
Points
159
Location
In the Bush (Peak Hill, NSW)
I've started to notice the use of the word `relatable`. The word (presumably intended as an adjective form of `to relate to`) is being employed in the sense of `I/we can easily relate to that'.Formerly we might have said:`Such and such makes them more sympathetic` but now we have this new word which can be slotted easilier into sentences.

Thus statements like: `Many find Britney Spears's struggle with mental health issues to be quite relatable`. (I made that one up but it might as well be true).

No doubt some time-rich smartass out there will give me chapter and verse on how this word has long existed blah de blah - but it seems to have come into prominence a lot lately.

And that might tell us something about the kind of age we're living in. Just as the term `wimp` came into wide use in the early Eighties, `relatable` seems to be the key word of the twenty teens - and it's a term of approval. A politician, for example, can go no better than be `relatable`.

In times past - and I mean the recent past - we didn't demand that our public figures need be so cuddly and apparently similar to us - except perhaps unless they were pop stars, comedians or actors and so on. Politicians were judged on their integrity and intentions not by the holding up of pints in pubs.

So what is going on then? Discuss amongst yourselves.
Dude! That's like, so relatable!
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
11,029
Likes
11,595
Points
294
Location
Out of Bounds
No doubt some time-rich smartass out there will give me chapter and verse on how this word has long existed blah de blah - but it seems to have come into prominence a lot lately. ...
At my age any opportunity to appear more time-rich than I truly am constitutes bait that must be set upon with vigor ... :omr:

In its earliest sense of "capable of being related" (i.e., expressed; described) the OED purportedly traces the word back to 1621.

In the sense of "capable of being related to something else" it can be traced back to the 19th century.

https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2019/01/relatable.html

In the sense at issue here - "capable of having someone (me, you, anyone) relate to it" - it can be traced in print at least as far back as a 1965 article in the educational journal Theory Into Practice.

The alleviation of nonpromotion
Walter B. Waetjen
Theory Into Practice, Volume 4, 1965 - Issue 3

This sense derives from the similarly recent mid-20th-century sense of relate as connoting ""to understand, to empathize with, to feel a connection with", which is attested by the OED as early as 1947.

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/15/magazine/15onlanguage.html

... And if it surfaced in 1947, you know what that means ....

45e9611843dd4f549f199a7cf2ba2701--ancient-aliens-meme-area-.jpg
 

Cochise

Justified & Ancient
Joined
Jun 17, 2011
Messages
4,840
Likes
4,277
Points
159
I've started to notice the use of the word `relatable`. The word (presumably intended as an adjective form of `to relate to`) is being employed in the sense of `I/we can easily relate to that'.Formerly we might have said:`Such and such makes them more sympathetic` but now we have this new word which can be slotted easilier into sentences.

Thus statements like: `Many find Britney Spears's struggle with mental health issues to be quite relatable`. (I made that one up but it might as well be true).

No doubt some time-rich smartass out there will give me chapter and verse on how this word has long existed blah de blah - but it seems to have come into prominence a lot lately.

And that might tell us something about the kind of age we're living in. Just as the term `wimp` came into wide use in the early Eighties, `relatable` seems to be the key word of the twenty teens - and it's a term of approval. A politician, for example, can go no better than be `relatable`.

In times past - and I mean the recent past - we didn't demand that our public figures need be so cuddly and apparently similar to us - except perhaps unless they were pop stars, comedians or actors and so on. Politicians were judged on their integrity and intentions not by the holding up of pints in pubs.

So what is going on then? Discuss amongst yourselves.
Sounds more like a table that can be recycled
 

Mungoman

Mostly harmless...
Joined
Feb 25, 2010
Messages
2,264
Likes
3,470
Points
159
Location
In the Bush (Peak Hill, NSW)
Why neither women not northerners should read the news.


The fact that the interviewer states that the northern accent would be very hard for most people to follow really does show how much times have changed.
I remember my Grandfathers accent when I was a bairn, he was a Seaton Delaval denizen, and his dialect was much stronger than his son, my Dad.

I could only understand every fourth or so word, as i recollect - he had been a pit man all his life - i don't know if that had anything to do with it. The other thing was that he'd been born in the 1880's, and would've learnt to speak from his Mam, who was taught to speak by her Mam, who would've spoken late 1700's dialect.

I suppose that the BBC was speaking of a cut glass northern accent.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
24,254
Likes
28,144
Points
284
Being 60, I can remember hearing that women shouldn't, indeed couldn't read the news because 'people wouldn't believe them'.
I remember celebrated women changing the world, always have and always will apart from the ones who aren't very good at doing that, exactly like more and less effective men.
 

Ermintruder

Existential pixelfixer
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,131
Likes
6,503
Points
284
"A cheeky little __________ "

Just No. Perhaps there never was a time for you to have, but you've had it. Begone!!!

As idioms go, this has become the anglolinguistic equivalent of Tom Hanks.

Initially quite novel & entertaining. Fun and well-suited quite a few times after that.

And then used far far FAR too often, to the point where you just want to hire a hitman.
 

ChasFink

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
106
Likes
167
Points
44
... Tom Hanks.

Initially quite novel & entertaining. Fun and well-suited quite a few times after that.

And then used far far FAR too often, to the point where you just want to hire a hitman.
I thought that was Michael Caine - or is he just the cinematic equivalent of the word "the"?
 

Ermintruder

Existential pixelfixer
Joined
Jul 13, 2013
Messages
5,131
Likes
6,503
Points
284
I thought that was Michael Caine
Well, not a lot of people know that....

Mr Caine is also guilty of over-use.

But not as uber-ubiquitously as either Tom (omni-celebrity) Hanks or the "c"-word (as in 'cheeky')
 
Joined
Jul 9, 2012
Messages
2,547
Likes
4,368
Points
159
I came across this image in a link posted to the Same Day as Notre Dame Burned Down thread, under the sub-title "#63 Me And Steamship ^_^". Can anyone tell me where in the picture there is the sub-titular steamship?

ISeeNoSteamships.jpg

I post, as this has brought to mind a childhood memory of watching Sesame Street, which I had previously dismissed as some sort of fever dream. The clip was of something I would have called an excavator, but the soundtrack had a chorus of children's voices exclaiming "It's a steamship!". Now, it clearly, to my English child's eyes, was not. Is this another of those divided-by-a-common-language things? C'mon, North Americans, explain yourselves!
 
Top