The Continuing Insult To The English Language

EnolaGaia

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... Personally, I think it's archaic and perhaps we do need to update to the American pronunciation. ...
IMHO it's more accurately phrased as:

I think it's archaic notably idiosyncratic and perhaps we do need to update to the American everyone else's pronunciation.

Because ...

I performed a cursory survey of pronunciations for "lieutenant" among major languages that incorporated the word into their lexicons. With the exception of Hindi (where it obviously arrived via the British and their "f"-ing version) I can find no place other than former Commonwealth nations using the "f" pronunciation.

On a related note ... I wonder whether the Portuguese, Spanish, and Italians deliberately truncated their equivalent words to "tenente" / "teniente" because they were sick and tired of hearing the French and English griping about it. :evillaugh:
 

Lb8535

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Yes I didn't want to post forever, but Australians and NZ according to one of the dictionaries on line say loo. But whatever you guys want to do. Also it apparently is a word meaning the person who steps in when the superior office is killed.
 

PeteByrdie

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I'd be fine with the pronunciation being updated if that were the decision our armed forces made. As is often told to language-conservatives these days, language changes, and I can certainly see the sense in such a transition. But for as long as the forces choose our traditional pronunciation, I choose to follow it.
 

Mungoman

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Your insight would certainly be appreciated Yith.

My colleague and I regularly work on air force and army camps, and our clients include personnel from a variety of ranks.

My younger colleague always pronounces 'lieutenant' as LOO-TENANT, for reasons I fully understand. His primary experience of the word is probably from cop shows from the US, and it's a logical way to pronounce the word based on the spelling. I've always said LEFF-TENANT, because, you know, I'm British.

The following exchange happened yesterday:

My Colleague 'What's the client's name?'
Myself 'LEFF-TENANT F---------'
My colleague 'LOO-TENANT!'
Myself 'LEFF-TENANT! We're British.'
My colleague 'LOO-TENANT!'

So in the guard room on the way in to the camp (the Infantry Battle School in Brecon, I've never been in that area before, it's beautiful) the Gurkha on duty read our paperwork and mumbled under his breath 'LOO-TENANT F---------'. I felt humble pie needed to be added to my diet.

Our client wasn't available so we dealt with the quartermaster. I got the chance to ask him how 'lieutenant' should be pronounced. He confirmed it should be 'LOO-TENANT'. When I asked what happened to LEFF-TENANT, he said, 'Oh, I think that was second world war.'

Online sources still give LEFF-TENANT as the correct British pronunciation of 'lieutenant'. Have the people I've been involved with in the forces been chuckling behind my back at my antiquated pronunciation of the word all this time? Are both still used in the forces, or is there a consensus? I'd appreciate any help from anyone currently involved with the armed forces.

I was told that Lootenant is used in the British navy, rather than Lefftenant.
 

Ladyloafer

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ok. this has been bugging me all week, and I can't figure out if its just me, or if its weirdly worded.

20190809_152121-1-1.jpg

what's the take on what this sounds like it means? i know what they are saying because i've seen it elsewhere explained more comprehensively, but it just doesn't seem right. is it me?
 

Mythopoeika

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ok. this has been bugging me all week, and I can't figure out if its just me, or if its weirdly worded.

View attachment 19560

what's the take on what this sounds like it means? i know what they are saying because i've seen it elsewhere explained more comprehensively, but it just doesn't seem right. is it me?
They probably mean 'at least 4 hours', not exactly 4 hours.
 

Yithian

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It's certainly ugly.

If you are unable to attend a class, please notify us at least four hours in advance.

Unless they are one-on-one classes, I'm not clear what you are supposed to 'cancel'.
 

Ladyloafer

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It's certainly ugly.

If you are unable to attend a class, please notify us at least four hours in advance.

Unless they are one-on-one classes, I'm not clear what you are supposed to 'cancel'.
i have edited the poster. in context 'a class' means 'the fitness class you have booked at this gym'.

'a class' is not the bit thats annoying me. what you have written, at least four hours in advance, is how i understand it, but thats not what the notice says. it just says, you must cancel four hours before it starts. maybe its me lol.
 

Yithian

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STRAW POLL:

How do you normally pronounce the word 'exit' (noun)?
  • a) EKS-zit
  • b) EKS-sit
  • c) EGG-zit
  • d) EGG-sit
  • e) Something else (please specify what).
(I shan't prejudice replies with my own response yet)
 

EnolaGaia

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I'm having trouble with the options as listed ... As a result of residual Swedish pronunciation minutiae, I don't "linger" on consonant sounds (to either side of the hyphenation) as illustrated. As such, I find my pronunciation is more "clipped" than suggested in the listed options. Having said that ...

Depending on the situation-specific degree of voicing / expressive intonation I'm likely to say:

EKS-it (softer version, most often used for the verb)
EGZ-it (harder version, most often used for the noun)

... but this is not a rigid differentiation (i.e., I may use either in a given situation).
 

Ermintruder

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How do you normally pronounce the word 'exit' (noun)?
c) ....but I do sometimes find myself doing a b), ie the EXSit/EGZit toggle, on a similar basis to @EnolaGaia.

And I'd only ever use the word 'exuant' as a stage direction, or if I was very drunk.

Valid to note that 'egress' is frequently getting used in an active verb sense (a contemporary linguistic cross-contamination from eg data networking) as the inverse of 'entrance' rather than 'exit'
 
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Krepostnoi

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I'd only ever use the word 'exuant' as a stage direction, or if I was very drunk.
Oh, dear lord. You have just reminded me of something I had successfully blanked for nearly 30 years, viz. having to go and ask for an exeat in order to have leave from lessons to play sportball. It was the kind of school where they not only made us use the term "exeat", they also taught us sufficient Latin to know it meant "let him leave." Still, it never did me any harm :crazy:
 

Yithian

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I had heard of an exeat at school, because I went to a grammar school that still taught Latin. I never had an exeat myself.
We needed them one if we were running errands or going to the dentist or leaving the school grounds for any reason during teaching ours.

Not required for sixth-formers.
 
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