The Continuing Insult To The English Language

henry

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Regularly suggests regularity of frequency.
exactly, a level of regularity that could only be established over time, and not necessarily continually ... repeatedly may well be simply on three occasions, or as some would have it ... thrice, a word that should be abrogated forthwith
 
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Nix...!

I understood that We (der Einweltanglosprachenvolk) were averse to using Latinate (or indeed any Johnny Foreigner) plurals on 'loan' words. I thought that the current fashionable argot demanded nothing more nor less than a simple "s" (though, please, dear God, not catastrophically-appended via any single surplus apostrophe)

If I were to refer (certainement dans Bradford or Bannockburn) to sports stadia rather than stadiums, or even write about employment bureaux as opposed to employment bureaus, I might find myself tied to a large copy of Beowulf and dragged through the streets of Norland until I were very verra sorry.

Iff'n it'd still been back late last century, continental et classic pluralisation might've been acceptable. People what speak'n'rite proper now have to do so very quietly, to avoid accusations of being one o'them interlecturals (coarse I is jus jokin lyke lol brb)

'...things proper'

@Krepostnoi, I'm not sure that you'll necessarily be aware of the (almost non self-parody) recalibration of Yoksheer accentualisation, into being nearly a varient version of RP (I exaggerate, but only a bit). The Game Of Thrones effect, and the likely future canonisation of Sean Bean, all conspires to make the tongue of the dales perhaps a dominant spoken style in Bringlish broadcasting and the meedja generally
Um. Oh dear. It's true that regional accents seem to have become the norm in TV dramas. I'm not sure why that is. Obviously plenty of people speak with regional accents, but absolutely a lot of us don't. I used to have a Yorkshire accent, but after I moved to Norfolk it kind of just quietly vanished and I now sound like an old school BBC news reader! I guess cause we didn't have TV when I was a kid, and I listened to an awful lot of Radio 4!

As for the rest of it, you're being appallingly ignorant and snobbish. I have a posh sounding accent, I very rarely swear, and only then by accident, and I do use quite a few polysyllabic words.

No-one working class I chat to on the market, for example, has ever taken the mickey in a nasty way, or asked me to explain what I'm talking about. Yeah, there may be some gentle ribbing, but it's only meant in fun.

I mean, it may be totally different where you live. But if it is, I'm sure you could easily overcome it. No need to get all passive aggressive about it!
 

Ermintruder

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As for the rest of it, you're being appallingly ignorant and snobbish
I would've gone more with being accidentally-insulting and casually elitist.

I mean, it may be totally different where you live
Scotland is an utterly-different multicase linguistic universe, compared to Norfolk. In every conceivable good & bad way. Some of us (have to? don't need to?... unsure) key-switch maybe hundreds of times a day. It can be a total subconscious minefield.

No need to get all passive aggressive about it!
If my deliberate hyperbole is ever giving that impression here on the forum, I apologise. Be assured that I don't come across that way in person (well, no more so than the standard level we all in society can be guilty of)

All I ever try to do here is exorcise my demons, inform, learn & entertain. And try not to use ten words when none would've been fine (dammit, done it again!)
 

skinny

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Apostrophe Protection Society closes its doors, announcing that 'the ignorance and laziness present in modern times have won!'
John Richards has dedicated his life to stamping out the misuse of apostrophes.
But at the age of 96 he's calling it a day, admitting it's all become a bit too much.

Mr Richards is closing down the Apostrophe Protection Society, which he founded in 2001 when he retired from a decades-long career as a newspaper reporter and subeditor



https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12...on-society-closes-down-john-richards/11756830
 

Yithian

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Cheeky! :fslap:

Anyway... Mr Richards is right. On this very board we have posters who don't know the correct uses of 'its' and 'it's', at least one of whom is responsible for the education of children.
Given that two of the three posters that come to mind as teachers do know the difference, and that I am the third, this concerns me!

If I am the guilty party, I assure you that I do also know the difference, but I don't always proof-read my posts.
 
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