The Continuing Insult To The English Language

Krepostnoi

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Train station seems a very minor complaint & hardly an abomination. It's a station for trains after all..
Are they still saying "station stop"? Although I loathe that particular tautological combination, I am still vaguely nostalgic for the recorded announcements on Grand Central. The "station stop" [1] before ours on the run up [2] from London was Brighouse, and I have never heard that place name enunciated with quite such care and precision as on the Grand Central service. GC was a rare gem among the dreck of the privatised rail companies (with all due respect to my esteemed fellow board members who work for them), until they were bought out by Arriva, at which point they were pulled back down into the crab bucket.

Notes:
[1] :meh:
[2] I have a lot of time for railway tradition, but I refuse to accept that I should say "down" as though London is the centre of the universe.
 

Krepostnoi

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Are they still saying "station stop"? Although I loathe that particular tautological combination, I am still vaguely nostalgic for the recorded announcements on Grand Central. The "station stop" [1] before ours on the run up [2] from London was Brighouse, and I have never heard that place name enunciated with quite such care and precision as on the Grand Central service. GC was a rare gem among the dreck of the privatised rail companies (with all due respect to my esteemed fellow board members who work for them), until they were bought out by Arriva, at which point they were pulled back down into the crab bucket.

Notes:
[1] :meh:
[2] I have a lot of time for railway tradition, but I refuse to accept that I should say "down" as though London is the centre of the universe.
And I am suddenly struck by the coincidental chain of thought which leads me to contemplate Brighouse, when I've just been posting in commemoration of Brig, and the tales he posted of weirdness at his house...
 

Min Bannister

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gordonrutter

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Peripart

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Surely your latter complaint is thrown out by your argument for why "railway station" should be used in place of "train station" - i.e. "since when did logic rule the roost in the English language?"
There's nothing recent about the use of "train" in the railway sense. This year happens to be its 200th anniversary.
https://www.etymonline.com/word/train
Points taken, both.

I am, of course, aware of the word "train" and its legitimate use in the area of railways, and have no problem with it at all (except when used to mean "locomotive"...). However, it seems to me that, in the UK media at least, the phrase "train station" has almost completely overtaken "railway station", and, well, I just don't like the sound of it, so there!

ShadyCavalier, you're right to pick me up on my "logic" point, but I seem to recall reading a piece by George Orwell, where he laid down some rules of writing, but advised ignoring them all if something looked wrong. And that's how I feel about the examples in my earlier mini-rant.
 

Lb8535

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Are they still saying "station stop"? Although I loathe that particular tautological combination, I am still vaguely nostalgic for the recorded announcements on Grand Central. The "station stop" [1] before ours on the run up [2] from London was Brighouse, and I have never heard that place name enunciated with quite such care and precision as on the Grand Central service. GC was a rare gem among the dreck of the privatised rail companies (with all due respect to my esteemed fellow board members who work for them), until they were bought out by Arriva, at which point they were pulled back down into the crab bucket.

Notes:
[1] :meh:
[2] I have a lot of time for railway tradition, but I refuse to accept that I should say "down" as though London is the centre of the universe.
I believe that the commuter lines north of NYC also use the word "station stop".
 

brownmane

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My peeve, and it will now last forever as long as I have to hear it is changing usage of "reassign" to "assign" at my workplace.

I work in group home settings and am trained in 4 different homes, with one home that I have a block (set shift schedule). Occasionally if a shift isn't filled by some one picking it up (b/c someone is off) then, If I am already scheduled for a shift at that time in my regular block schedule, I can be "reassigned" to the home needing coverage.

Some dull wit must have thought that a revision was needed to make it sound more positive? Not a clue, as one day management started to use "assign" instead. And they were obviously directed to use the word cuz it was changed across the board.

Anyone knows that when you are already scheduled to work at one place at a certain time, that you are assigned to that shift. Once you are moved to work in another location, you have been reassigned. I continue to use the correct word and will not be brainwashed into using the other ridiculous word in place of
 

Ladyloafer

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One that annoys me more than it should is when people talk about an event being moved back. Such as a movie that was going to premiere in september, gets pushed back to december.
Surely if an event is in front of you in time and it gets moved further away, it's being pushed forward.
What the...?
Logically i agree with you, and yet the more i think about it the less sense it makes.
You would Pull towards you, and Push away from you. So if an event is now further ahead in time....nope, i was about to argue myself in circles there. Its right to push it back but it seems wrong.
 

Min Bannister

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We have been putting up signs at work as we are to have a one way system and were tying ourselves in knots trying to work out the difference between No Entry and No Exit. Some of the signs even say things like Entry Only No Exit and No Exit, Entry Only. Who thought them up I don't know.
 

ChasFink

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... What's going on here? I've also heard people who are standing up being referred to as "standees"! This can't be right, and it needs to stop... or does it? Is it just me? Help!
"Standee" is an actual / documented word, and it is not new.
Around 1980 some of the newer local buses had yellow lines, rather than the traditional white lines, on the floor behind the driver. This meant the bus company could no longer use the signs that said "Federal law prohibits operation of this bus while anyone is standing forward of the white line". They had new signs made up that replaced "white line" with "standee line". It was the first time I saw the word. When I asked a friend who sometimes rode the bus if he knew what a standee line was, he had no idea.

I believe that the commuter lines north of NYC also use the word "station stop".
I sometimes hear "station stop" on the Long Island Railroad (East of NYC) and elsewhere. It always seemed to make sense to me, since there could also be service stops, unscheduled stops between stations due to problems, etc.
 

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I sometimes hear "station stop" on the Long Island Railroad (East of NYC) and elsewhere. It always seemed to make sense to me, since there could also be service stops, unscheduled stops between stations due to problems, etc.
Yes, it kind of makes sense to me, too.

The train you are travelling on may very well not be scheduled to stop at the next station on your route - and a train stopping is no indication that you are at a station. The actions aren't really synonymous, therefore it's not really a tautology in the way it is often made out to be.
 

ChasFink

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I was thinking more about this last night.

I believe the usual language when announcing L.I.R.R. trains is "making stops at...", which avoids the word "station", but individual stops are announced automatically as stations, with live announcements using "station", "stop", or "station stop".

There are two stops scheduled on many trains (Hillside Facility and Boland's Landing) that are arguably not stations in the common sense, since they are for employees only and serve maintenance facilities. The railroad does call them stations, though.
 

Lb8535

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I was thinking more about this last night.

I believe the usual language when announcing L.I.R.R. trains is "making stops at...", which avoids the word "station", but individual stops are announced automatically as stations, with live announcements using "station", "stop", or "station stop".

There are two stops scheduled on many trains (Hillside Facility and Boland's Landing) that are arguably not stations in the common sense, since they are for employees only and serve maintenance facilities. The railroad does call them stations, though.
I'm not so sure amtrak doesn't also do it. It's common.
 

Min Bannister

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My dictionary has "re - again. See the list below, where the meaning may be inferred from the word to which re is prefixed."

Neither is on there but it sounds to me like you can just attach it to anything. But reclosable does sound clumsy.
 

Squail

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My dictionary has "re - again. See the list below, where the meaning may be inferred from the word to which re is prefixed."

Neither is on there but it sounds to me like you can just attach it to anything. But reclosable does sound clumsy.
My bolding, above: brings a thing irresistibly to mind for me -- which was admittedly a personal oddity of just one bod (at least, I've never encountered it from anyone else), not a general trend.

Said bod, was a one-time work colleague of mine: an extremely eccentric lady (that is putting it "most favourably"). She had admirable qualities -- was very kind and caring and charitable -- but she talked incessantly (it was a puzzle, how she found time to do any work); much of it, wildly colourful and often most-improbable narratives about assorted supposed former occupations / careers of hers in her long life) -- and her use of the language featured many strange quirks. One was: positively an addiction to coining words by putting "re" in front, in connection with anything and everything to do with the repeated doing of stuff. There come to my mind "re-give", "re-buy", and "re-build-up"; and -- possibly her masterpiece -- Communism in Eastern Europe "re-rearing its ugly head".

I suppose I should have had more charity concerning this -- basically harmless -- thing of hers; but it came to grate on me: especially because of the almost robotic nature of the process. It seems that she never, ever varied the matter by speaking of, for example, doing something "anew" or "afresh" -- it was always and invariably, this "re-" routine. A lovely person in a number of ways; but a very irritating one -- not only to me.
 

ChasFink

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This story is in Google News today:
Donald Trump Jr’s new anti-Biden book misplaces apostrophe in title
Liberal Privilege, which he is self-publishing in August, is subtitled ‘Joe Biden and the Democrat’s Defense of the Indefensible’

(The second part of the headline pretty much sums up the story; full story here: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...anti-biden-book-misplaces-apostrophe-in-title)

No, I'm not going to discuss politics.

Is this really a mistake? Couldn't the younger Mr. Trump be referring to "the Democrat" in some idealized sense the way we might say "the giraffe is a tall animal" when we mean giraffes in general? That would make the singular possessive correct.
 

GNC

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This story is in Google News today:
Donald Trump Jr’s new anti-Biden book misplaces apostrophe in title
Liberal Privilege, which he is self-publishing in August, is subtitled ‘Joe Biden and the Democrat’s Defense of the Indefensible’

(The second part of the headline pretty much sums up the story; full story here: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...anti-biden-book-misplaces-apostrophe-in-title)

No, I'm not going to discuss politics.

Is this really a mistake? Couldn't the younger Mr. Trump be referring to "the Democrat" in some idealized sense the way we might say "the giraffe is a tall animal" when we mean giraffes in general? That would make the singular possessive correct.
Maybe he has a massive grudge against one Democrat in particular, and the rest are fine by him?
 

brownmane

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We have been putting up signs at work as we are to have a one way system and were tying ourselves in knots trying to work out the difference between No Entry and No Exit. Some of the signs even say things like Entry Only No Exit and No Exit, Entry Only. Who thought them up I don't know.
What happened to the signage of "exit" and "enter"? lol
 

ChasFink

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And now for something completely different.

I have noticed a significant increase in the use of the word "pregnant" when referring to couples: "We're pregnant." "I understand that you and your wife are pregnant."

You and your wife may be expecting a child, but only she is pregnant - unless you also have a uterus that contains an embryo or fetus.
 

Min Bannister

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What happened to the signage of "exit" and "enter"? lol
I am not sure. The company that manages our building came up with them unfortunately so we couldn't just make our own. I realised yesterday as well that the signs which are supposed to be the "Entry" signs also have a red circle with a line through it. You know, the symbol that usually denotes No Entry.
 

Ermintruder

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But reclosable does sound clumsy.
Indeed it does. Yet idiomatically indispensible.

The epitome of unreclosable could be an opened-but-unconsumed packet of crisps (cf "chips" in jurisdictions that insist on such petty colonial differentiality).

The mylar coated film bags are, of course, designed to uncurl with the determination of a clockspring cobra, so that the contents can more easily whisper to those of us who are substance-dependant in the carbs category.

This would require the application of a deunrecloseabler, which has just become the technical term for a clothes-peg in catering contexts (in North America, these pegs are known as britches-hitches.....perhaps).

In our home, so as to avoid any such complex clipping and consequent angst, we ensure that all opened packets of crisps / bags of chips are eaten as rapidly as possible.

(Oh crumbs, I may have over-thought this....).

[Apologies for my recent lack of attendance at lectures, here on the forum. I realise I may be dragged up in front of the Dean, and forced to retake the whole semester....but unfortunately I have a really-accurate excuse.....my life just now feels like I'm still living through a very-bad episode of Planet of the Apes]
 
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Analogue Boy

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I am not sure. The company that manages our building came up with them unfortunately so we couldn't just make our own. I realised yesterday as well that the signs which are supposed to be the "Entry" signs also have a red circle with a line through it. You know, the symbol that usually denotes No Entry.
You could argue these confusing signs could cause problems if there was a fire where people need clear instructions on building exits. Chuck the fire regulation rulebook at them.
 

Spookdaddy

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What happened to the signage of "exit" and "enter"? lol
I think the theory is that we tend to register negative instructions more effectively.

Imagine a room with four walls and a door in the middle of each. Three doors lead safely to the outside - one door has an uncaged tiger behind it.

Which is the safer option?:

a) Three doors have 'EXIT' written on them.

b) One door has 'NO EXIT' written on it.

We could argue the toss for hours as to what we as individuals would do, but I have absolutely no doubt that the former option is very soon going to lead to one hell of a big fat tiger.

...I realised yesterday as well that the signs which are supposed to be the "Entry" signs also have a red circle with a line through it. You know, the symbol that usually denotes No Entry.
That's actually potentially quite dangerous.

I work in potentially hazardous conditions - often sharing points of interface with the public. It's a justified cliche in site environments that one should never underestimate the potential stupidity of the general public (or a certain proportion of your own staff). However, I think you can also add that you should never overestimate the infallibility of the poor sod who has the job of ordering all your signage from Screwfix.
 
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