The Dashka Stone / "Map of the Creator"

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Anonymous

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#1
120 million years?
A find of Bashkir scientists contraries to traditional notions of human history: stone stabs which is 120 million years covered with the relief map of Ural Region.

This seems to be impossible. Scientists of Bashkir State University have found indisputable proofs of an ancient highly developed civilization’s existence. The question is about a great plate found in 1999, with picture of the region done according to an unknown technology. This is a real relief map. Today’s military has almost similar maps. The map contains civil engineering works: a system of channels with a length of about 12,000 km, weirs, powerful dams. Not far from the channels, diamond-shaped grounds are shown, whose destination is unknown. The map also contains some inscriptions. Even numerous inscriptions. At first, the scientists thought that was Old Chinese language. Though, it turned out that the subscriptions were done in a hieroglyphic-syllabic language of unknown origin. The scientists never managed to read it…
More here.
 

Breakfastologist

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#2
Funnily enough you get a lot of similar stories in pravda.ru and I have never noticed any of them appearing anywhere else, even though if they were correct they would be carrying the most important discoveries of the last five hundred years or so.

I haven't noticed them reporting any busses on the moon lately, but I'm sure its just a matter of time.
 

carole

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#4
I can't see how they've deduced that it was 120 million years old. Have they found any archaeological evidence of the 'civil engineering' works mentioned in the article? Probably not.

Carole
 
A

Anonymous

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#5
Struck me that the writing/map may not be that old. Have they independently tested the ink/paint whatever it is to find out its age and make up?

Also, it just could be a really bad translation. Perhaps it's twelve years, not 120 million. Just a cheeky thought. :p
 

_schnor

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#6
Yes, the rock itself is probably 120 million years old and someone made a fundamental fubar along the way, but who knows how old the ink is, maybe a few thousand?
 

rossba1

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#7
i would really like this to be true but...
i seriously doubt the urals would have remained unchanged for 120 M years. The slab itself just looks like a big chunk of cracked rock. Why are there no close ups of the inscription/map? The embedded shells are just proof that the rock is really old. It could have been carved yesterday (apart from witness testimony).
still if it turned out to be a map only a couple of hundred years old it would still be interesting.
Do Pravda still have a political agenda? Are they still trying to persuade everyone that Russia did it first?
 
A

Anonymous

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#8
I found the whole story very sketchy on details or hard facts.
Some stuff in Pravda is just the Russian version of the Weekly World News
 

Cult_of_Mana

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#9
I'm wondering whether today is Russia's equivalent of April Fool's Day.
The translation of the article is a little strange. The 'scientists' appear to have dated the rock and found that it's over a million years old. Mana falls over with astonishment. Really?! But they haven't tested the porcelain glaze. My understanding of the article is that the map was carved not painted so there won't be any inks to test.
My mind shouts hoax anyway. Interesting, though bizarre anyway.
 

bagins_X

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#10
schnor said:
Yes, the rock itself is probably 120 million years old
and the carving could be any age, Pravda is about as reliable as any of the western "chip rappers" as far as this sort of thing is concerned, still it is an intreaging concept.

Wm.
 
A

Anonymous

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#11
Just a whimsical thought...

Mana said:
I'm wondering whether today is Russia's equivalent of April Fool's Day?
Imagine, in the distant future, some guy - the avid clipster of his time - sifting through the ancient 'newspaper' archives...and coming to the conclusion that the day known as '1 April' was remarkable for its heavy concentration of anomalous phenomena! And, of course, quickly getting a book out on it.
 
A

Anonymous

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#12
Yep, doesn't seem right. All they know is how old the rock is. And a map 120 million years old should have succumbed to entropy I'd think.

Also, that the ural mountains have remained unchanged for 120 million years(if they have) seems to me to only show the map could have been made any time up to 120 million years ago. So it could also have been made yesterday.
 
A

Anonymous

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#13
Definitely something rotten in the state of Denmark. It looks to me ;ike it might be a bad translation of an article which is relying on pretty shady details to start with. A bit of a game of chinese whispers. Its also very difficult to have inscriptions which are like early-chinese but cant be translated, Chinese pictograms each represent an individual word so a chinese character represents a concept indipendent of its pronunciation. Even the earliest chines is very easty to read (although not for me as I can only swear)
 

Ermintruder

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#15
This is such an odd story on so many levels.

Firstly, because I'm totally-unfamiliar with this tale, I can't help wondering if it is perhaps nothing more than an internet imaginarius. The article claims discovery dates in the 1990s, and I cannot see any way in which FT or FTMB would've missed this (a forum search has uncovered nothing, and I have no recollection of it having been covered, ever, in FT, even as a sidenote).

Secondly, surely this type of artefact falls into the conclusive category of "yes it is" OR "no it's not". Either there is an inarguable mutipoint match to static geographic features, or there isn't. The slab itself is either a definably-artificial article (with a layered construction), or it's just a natural accretion with a simacrulum cracked surface.

I will be very interested to see what other forum members make of this
For me, there are lots of red flags...but, I am skeptical about everything.

http://www.ancient-origins.net/arti...-dashka-stone-120-million-year-old-map-006589


The Dashka Stone is a controversial artifact that it is believed by some to be the guidelines used by the architect of the world. Known as the Map of the Creator, this stone tablet has baffled researchers since its discovery in 1999. As impossible as it may seem, Russian experts believe the stone map, could be 120 million years old.

The Dashka slab depicts not only the environs of the Ural Mountains, but also a series of civil engineering projects including 7457 miles (12,000 km) of channels, several dams, and hieroglyphic notations of unknown origin. The accuracy and perspective of the map suggest that it was created from an aerial point of observation. The hieroglyphs have not, as of the time of writing, been deciphered but are thought to be related to an ancient form of Chinese
 

EnolaGaia

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#17
First, let's go back to the original sources for the story, shall we?

At least in English translation, the story seems to have surfaced in Pravda in April 2002:

http://www.pravdareport.com/news/russia/30-04-2002/42113-0/

A subsequent Pravda item from a month later (the article most commonly cited / linked afterward):

http://www.pravdareport.com/news/russia/30-05-2002/43461-0/

... announced a press conference yet another month hence, and related the story of the stone's discovery a bit differently than the earlier / original story.

Every other reference I've found to date seems to be a spin-off from, or embellished regurgitation of, these original sources.
 

EnolaGaia

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#18
Here are some factoids relating to the two initial articles:

- The 2 stories don't match on the date or context of discovery.

- The slab was discovered in the course of a years-long effort to locate evidence of Chinese migration into the region. During this effort they encountered references to a set of up to 200 mysterious slabs noted in the 18th century and later. Multiple expeditions failed to locate these alleged slabs.

- The earlier story claims the slab was visible beneath the porch of a local man who'd heard Alexandr Chuvyrov (a physicist; the steward / promoter of the stone) was looking for ancient stone slabs. He showed Chuvyrov the slab on 21 July 1999. Chuvyrov had to go to the regional capital (Ufa; circa 40 miles southwest) to get help.

- The later story claims the stone was dug up from a depth of slightly more than a meter beneath the ground surface on 28 July 1999, and omits all mention of its having been found in Chandar under someone's porch and visible from the start. This omission results in the impression the slab was discovered by one of Chuvyrov's expeditions via exploratory excavation.

- According to the earlier article, the layered structure of the slab seems to be a middle layer of, or rich in, diopside with dolomite behind / below and a 'calcium porcelain' in front / above.

- The later article describes the composition as a 3-layered 'cement', with the upper / frontal layer being a 'white porcelain'.

- The earlier article specifies that the 'map' is engraved / inscribed in this middle layer, and the 'porcelain' layer is a protective overlay.

- Neither article mentions removing the front / top 'porcelain' layer to expose the middle layer, so this claim of the map being in the middle layer is murky to say the least.

- The purported 120 million year old age attributed to the map is based on the stone's composition, and reflects the younger of two shells purportedly found embedded in the frontal / top 'porcelain' layer (the other was claimed to date back some 500 million years).

- The 'porcelain' layer is claimed to be only 2mm thick. There's no way any layer that thin contains fossils separated by circa 380 million years unless they were mixed together by secondary deposition. Either naturally mixed or blended into an artificial 'cement', this mixture undermines the claim that the age of the fossils has anything to do with the age of this allegedly manufactured slab.

- It's not clear to me why an allegedly 120 million year old 3D map is validated by projections of correlations with geographical features of the present day.

I'll stop there ... The fumes are getting through my aghast mask, and my Acme BS meter is so strenuously pegged out in its red zone I fear it will blow up.

In the images of the stone I don't see anything other than a weathered, apparently sedimentary, stone surface exhibiting a fractured / cracked texture that appears entirely natural (or, more to the point, anything but artificial).

I'm frankly struggling to understand how anyone read a map into its appearance, even factoring in the human propensity for pareidolia.

If there's any solid data supporting the hand-waved claims for what 'experts' have supposedly concluded about the stone, I'd love to see it.
 

AlchoPwn

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#19
I'm frankly struggling to understand how anyone read a map into its appearance, even factoring in the human propensity for pareidolia. If there's any solid data supporting the hand-waved claims for what 'experts' have supposedly concluded about the stone, I'd love to see it.
That was pretty comprehensive EG. :clap:
I am impressed. It seems Pravda is up to its old tricks (as if it ever stopped).
 

EnolaGaia

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#20
That was pretty comprehensive EG. :clap:
I am impressed. It seems Pravda is up to its old tricks (as if it ever stopped).
Thanks ... :hoff:

This story is 'old tricks', in that it's 16 years old. The one thing about it that's even stranger than the amount of interest it obtained a decade and a half ago is the fact it's still being cited as if it has substance today. :dunno:
 

Krepostnoi

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#21
It's also worth noting that some web-savvy Russian bought up the pravda.ru domain before the venerable newspaper could. Said web-savvy Russian then promptly turned it into a National Enquirer- style scandal sheet. Neither incarnation can be said to be particularly trustworthy.
 

Ermintruder

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#22
I can't help wondering if it is perhaps nothing more than an internet imaginarius.
@EnolaGaia , as ever, a masterful analysis (and @Krepostnoi , your clarification regarding the seperacy between what are two Pravdas is metaphorically-resonant with much of the multi-layered mud that is this story).

I'm so glad that FT itself did not become entangled into accidentially-embodying this fable, and similarly for FTMB. My spider-sense was activating my Acme BS meters, too, @EnolaGaia . It's always good to be open-minded... but this tablet-tale was far too tall to swallow whole.
 

humanoidlord

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#23
bullshit certainly, this quote i find particulary suspicious:
The Dashka slab depicts not only the environs of the Ural Mountains, but also a series of civil engineering projects including 7457 miles (12,000 km) of channels, several dams, and hieroglyphic notations of unknown origin. The accuracy and perspective of the map suggest that it was created from an aerial point of observation. The hieroglyphs have not, as of the time of writing, been deciphered but are thought to be related to an ancient form of Chinese
i see nothing but a bunch of sinuous lines (probable natural cracking) in a huge slab that could be artificial
 

Ermintruder

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#25

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#26
Just a whimsical thought...



Imagine, in the distant future, some guy - the avid clipster of his time - sifting through the ancient 'newspaper' archives...and coming to the conclusion that the day known as '1 April' was remarkable for its heavy concentration of anomalous phenomena! And, of course, quickly getting a book out on it.

In a similar vein, whenever I hear about historians wondering about the meaning of some cave paintings (for example) somewhere, I sometimes ponder whether some of those artefacts are just... graffiti of their day, or someone having a laugh... you know? And we're here, thousands of years later, trying to figure out the meaning of it...

... when maybe, sometimes, there is no real meaning to it.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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#27
With regards to the original post though, about the Ural map... I've seen pictures of it and (to me at least) it looks nothing like a map of the Ural Region, it just looks like a stone with scratches on it.

Here's a different link though (non-pravda)... with pictures... couldn't say either way how reliable this site is though so take some salt with you..

https://coolinterestingstuff.com/ancient-alien-evidence-ural-relief-map
 
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