The Gilbert Deya Ministries & 'Miracle Babies'

Mighty_Emperor

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Thu 12 Aug 2004

12:13pm (UK)

Archbishop's 'Miracle Babies' Raise Child Trafficking Fears

By Helen William, PA News


A disturbing world in which a religious guru convinces British women they are pregnant by God with a “miracle baby” was exposed today in a radio investigation.

The claims prompted fears of child exploitation and baby trafficking.

Both the Church of England and the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology have called on the Metropolitan Police to investigate the claims involving members of one of Britain’s fastest growing Evangelical churches – The Gilbert Deya Ministries.

Its head, the self-styled Archbishop Gilbert Deya, pronounces the women worshippers as pregnant “by Jesus”, according to the BBC Radio 4’s Face the Facts investigation.

They then travel to Archbishop Deya’s Kenyan homeland where they apparently give birth to babies within days in backstreet clinics in the slums of Nairobi.

British authorities have already taken one of these so called “miracle” babies into care after tests revealed its DNA did not match either of its supposed parents. Later its Kenyan birth certificate was found to be a forgery, according to the programme.


Dominic Walker, the Bishop of Monmouth and the Church of England’s spokesman on deliverance, said: “Charismatic church leaders are very powerful. And they can abuse that power.

“I believe in miracles but with the DNA evidence I don’t believe these are miracle children.

“I think some sort of baby trafficking is going on and it needs an urgent police investigation to get to the bottom of it.

Medical evidence clearly showed that these women were not pregnant, according to Consultant Patrick O’Brien, from the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, who feared the pronouncements were exploiting would-be parents.

He said: “Childless couples are very vulnerable and so desperate that they would believe virtually anything. These are not miracle children but someone else’s children and the authorities should find out whose.”

There are 36,000 members of The Gilbert Deya Ministries in Britain which also boasts branches in Europe, Africa and Asia.

Archbishop Deya has been at the centre of controversy before when he was investigated in 2000 for allegedly exorcising demons from children.

But he remains unfazed by fears, prompted by the DNA evidence, that the “miracle” births are a scam.

He told the programme: “The ‘miracle babies’ which are happening now in our ministry is beyond a human imagination. It’s not something that I can say I can explain because they are of God and things of God cannot be explained by human beings.”

His wife Mary describes the children as a “holy ghost baby” that “came through prayer, that was why the doctor could not find” them.

Archbishop Deya claims to have helped post menopausal women give birth – including a 56 year-old who has had 13 “miracle” babies in three years.

Worshippers cannot be shifted in their belief of the miracle babies are a genuine gift from God.

Funds have been flooding into the church in response to the so-called “miracles”.

Members, many of them middle class and well educated, are expected to contribute a tenth of their income. A new church building, worth a million pounds, is being built in south east London

Charles Nyeko, a product designer, is the proud father of Daniel whom he describes as a “miracle I never thought I’d see in my lifetime”.

Daniel was born in Kenya last month but just two months earlier scans carried out by British doctors confirmed that his wife Miriam was not pregnant.

“Now we have the proof,” he told the programme, “a miracle from God. We don’t understand how it has happened, we are just grateful that it has.”

Kenyan authorities are now insisting on DNA tests to establish whether Daniel is really the Nyeko’s child.

Mr Nyeko hopes Daniel will be allowed to travel to Britain, but does not know when his wife might return.

He said: “Miriam is in a terrible state with no idea what will happen and we don’t know what to think”.

The church was registered as a charity in Britain in 1996.

The Charity Commission launched an investigation in 2000 after worried relatives of church-goers complained of their increasingly bizarre behaviour.

Archbishop Deya was the subject of investigation by child protection bodies after conducting exorcisms on young children.

The BBC has agreed to had over its findings to the Metropolitan Police.

Face the Facts is on BBC Radio 4 on August 13 at 12.30pm
http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=3331715
 

escargot

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I heard about this on t'wireless last week but couldn't find anything on the 'net to show on here.
It's a blatant scam.
True, desperate people believe what they want to believe, but they must be telling lies about where the babies come from.

I'll be listening at 12:30 on my Walkman radio at the gym. :)

We need a 'concentrating' smiley.
 

austen27

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I heard it today - it is typical of the worst sort of Evangelical Christianity - suspend all your critical faculties because i say this is a miracle! It seems so obvious that this is purely child trafficking. I don't blame the "parents" though - I think some of tham are genuinely brainwashed into believeing that theses really are their babies, and to be fair the kids would have a better life here than in an orphanage.
 
A

Anonymous

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Pregnant By Jesus?

BBC News Online: 'Pregnant By Jesus?'
Friday, 13 August, 2004

They're called "miracle babies" and for some childless couples in Britain, they're a dream come true. But doctors and Church of England officials are worried the babies aren't miracles at all, but either a shortcut adoption process or a baby-trafficking scheme.

...

... The Nyekos are the latest couple who claim to have had a miracle conception. Members of one of Britain's fastest-growing churches - the Gilbert Deya Ministries - they say their three-week old son is a "miracle from God."

But the Church of England and Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology are calling for an investigation into the so-called "miracle babies" being born to British women.

A BBC investigation looked into the births and discovered that the church's leader, Kenyan-born Gilbert Deya, prays over the childless women, and they are pronounced pregnant by Jesus.

Backstreets of Nairobi

The women then travel to Kenya where they apparently give birth in what are described as backstreet clinics in Nairobi.

Radio 4's Face the Facts discovered that one of the "miracle babies" has been taken into care after tests revealed that its DNA did not match either of its parents. Later, it was discovered the child's Kenyan birth certificate was a forgery.

"I believe in miracles, but I don't believe that people can have babies miraculously that have totally different DNA," says Dominic Walker, the Bishop of Monmouth. "I think it's very difficult when people are claiming something's a miracle when perhaps it's a criminal activity."

But Archbishop Deya - whose group has more than 36,000 members in Britain and which is building a £1 million church in south London - told the BBC that there was no explanation for the miracle babies. He said he wasn't surprised their DNA wasn't the same as their parents, as they came from God.

The Archbishop said he's seen post-menopausal women give birth, including a 56-year-old who has had 13 miracle babies over the past three years.

"The 'miracle babies' which are happening now in our ministry is beyond a human imagination, but it's not something that ... I can explain because they are of God and things of God cannot be explained by human beings," Archbishop Deya said.

"Unless somebody's blind, how can you say the woman is not pregnant?" he added. "We witness they are pregnant, they went to Kenya and they came with the babies, so we believe that where the tummy was big the baby has come out."

The ministry has 14 branches in Britain, as well as locations in Africa, Asia, and other parts of Europe, and Archbishop Deya has attracted the attention of authorities in the past.

Investigation

He was investigated by the Church of England after conducting exorcisms on young children, but no action was taken. ...
There's been a Documentary about it on the
BBC Radio4: 'Face The Facts' documentary series, called:

'A 'CURE' FOR INFERTILITY'

Click on the link above to listen to the documentary.
 

TheQuixote

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I read at the weekend that one of the ministries is based in Birmingham not far from where I have been carrying out some outreach work. Horrible, horrible...

'Miracle babies' seized in Kenya

Police in Kenya have seized 11 "miracle babies" for DNA tests after allegations of child trafficking.

The children were picked up at the home of Archbishop Gilbert Deya in the capital, Nairobi.

The UK-based evangelical pastor claims to be able to make post-menopausal or infertile women pregnant by exorcising their demons.

But some children's charities say his actions are a front for baby trafficking.

Correspondents say Kenya's government was coming under increasing pressure to launch investigations into the "miracle baby" claims.

The Kenya Medical Association says the claims need to be fully investigated as they are ''contrary to proven scientific laws''.

The Kenyan pastor and his wife claim to have got 13 children in a period of five years through ''prayers''.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/world/africa/3572742.stm

Published: 2004/08/17 10:44:15 GMT

© BBC MMIV
 

Mighty_Emperor

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'Miracle Babies' Shown to Media





The East African Standard (Nairobi)

August 16, 2004
Posted to the web August 16, 2004

Evelyn Kwamboka
Nairobi

A 56 year-old woman, who claims to have given birth twice a year yesterday on more than one occasion, defended Archbishop Gilbert Deya's "miracle babies" mystery.

Mrs Eddah Odera who has given birth to 13 children in a span of five years, said since the birth of her fourth born, she has been conceiving without any sexual contact with her husband.

The children aged between five and two months old, play together at their house in Nairobi's Komarock estate as they are monitored by two nannies paid by Deya Ministries.

Cuddling her two months old baby, the frail looking woman said she was carrying another one in her womb.

"I had reached menopause when we took one of our relatives to Deya's office to be prayed for. It was then that I told I was carrying a baby in my womb," she said.

The woman, who had a miscarriage 13 years before meeting Mrs Mary Deya, was told that the baby was a live in her womb.

"At my age, I thought this was a joke because a woman in menopause cannot conceive," she added.

Two weeks later, she started feeling movements of a baby in her womb and gave birth to Daniel Wesonga on June 22, 1999.

The following year, she gave birth to three children with the first one being on May 26, September 2 and 23 December.

"I was shocked because after giving birth to John Okoth (second born), I felt some movements in my tummy two weeks later," she added.

When she went to hospital, doctors told her that they could not see anything in the scanning report.

The pattern was the same with the following two children, forcing her to stop sexual contact with her husband, Mr Michael Odera.

However, in January 10, 2001 the woman gave birth to a bouncing baby boy whom he named Simon Siaw.

Seven months later, Rachel Achieng was born, followed by Paul Ochieng on December 20.

In 2002, the Odera's had two more children (baby girls) with one born on March 15 and the other on September 22.

This year, she has given birth to two children and another one is due before the end of the year.

All the children born at Mama Lucy clinics in Nairobi's Eastlands area are said to be having no health complications.

The Odera's were reacting to a story in yesterday's paper on UK police investigating Deya's "miracle babies" saga.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200408160791.html
 

Leaferne

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What is she, a vending machine?!
 

Kondoru

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The sad thing is this cult is offering people exactly what `they` want. Something that would be difficult to get by any other method.

Before we condemn this, we must question the justness of our own adoption system.

Also wasnt the problem of child trafficking covered in the muti murders thread? Arent there a lot of couples who ought to be tested for genetic compatibility with their `offspring`?

If a middle class couple go to a third world country and return with a mysterious baby, I for one wont be too bothered.
 
A

Anonymous

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Police Probe 'Miracle Babies' Pastor

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=583&e=2&u=/nm/20040820/od_nm/crime_kenya_dc

Police Probe 'Miracle Babies' Pastor
Fri, Aug 20, 2004

NAIROBI (Reuters) - Kenyan police are investigating whether a pastor who claims miraculous powers to make infertile women pregnant may be involved in child trafficking.



Gilbert Deya, a Kenyan pastor who heads the British-based Gilbert Deya Ministries, claims to exorcise demons from women who are unable to conceive naturally by praying for them.


The women, some of whom are past menopause, are then brought to Kenya where they supposedly give birth and return to London with babies, police said.


"We believe in God, but we do not think God works that way. These are not miracle babies, they belong somewhere," Criminal Investigations Department spokesman Gideon Kibunja said on Friday.


"We are interviewing the people found with the children ... We suspect it is a child smuggling ring."


Police Tuesday discovered 11 children aged between five months and 12 years living in Nairobi with a 56-year-old woman who said she conceived them without having sex with her husband after Deya's wife prayed for her.


The couple are under arrest and the children have been transferred to a home in the Kenyan capital. Kibunja said police were arranging for DNA tests to be carried out on the children, with the results expected next week.
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Saturday, August 21, 2004



Plot now thickens as ‘miracle’ saga points at scandal

By Douglas Okwatch, Investigative Editor

Detectives were yesterday trying to put together pieces in the jigsaw puzzle that evangelist Gilbert Deya’s ‘miracle babies’ saga has evolved into.

And even as the preacher continued to zealously defend his bizarre claims from London, a police raid in the preacher’s residence in Mountain View Estate yesterday yielded nine infants, further throwing the miracle claim into deeper doubt.

Sources told East African Standard that investigators want to establish if it was a mere coincidence that Miriam Nyeko, a Ugandan, and Edith Unegbu, a Nigerian, both holders of British passports came to Kenya to deliver their babies. Yesterday, detectives working on this lead were of the view that owing to their privileged status, the two could conveniently be used to obtain travel documents for infants back to the UK, where Archbishop Deya of the Gilbert Deya Ministries –a registered charity in England and Wales— is currently facing alleged child trafficking charges. Unegbu has reportedly already fled the country.

Last night, as evidence of what could turn out to be an elaborate child trafficking syndicate continued to emerge, detectives were beginning to cast the drag net far and wide with reports that they would be questioning "in the near future" officers at the Registrar of Births, Immigration Department, Children’s Department, children’s homes and a number of adoption agencies in an attempt to build up a possible child trafficking case.

With this fresh evidence, a pattern also started emerging yesterday where it is apparent that babies are ‘conceived’ in the UK, then weeks after the alleged pregnancies occur, the would-be mothers conveniently claim mistreatment in the hands of British GPs or NHS doctors, use that as an excuse to travel to Nairobi, where they give birth, following pregnancies that would not be confirmed in the UK. The suspects then arrange for passports at the British High Commission – the same institution that blew the whistle on what could turn out to be a huge atrocity — and travel back with the infants.

Incensed by our daily revealing coverage of the so-called ‘miracle babies’, Deya yesterday rang to brand this writer a "servant of Satan who will remain cursed for generations to come."

Renowned Nairobi radiologist J N Ondeko referred to the pregnancies as pseudosysis [false pregnancy] –a medical condition in which the stomach appears bloated. Common in women who have problems with childbirth, the condition mimics pregnancy in all its aspects including labour, and even contractions.

No medical evidence has been produced to prove infertility in the younger women –Unegbu and Nyeko. There has also been no evidence of conception, or even childbirth in recent times in the elderly Mrs Eddah Odera –already in advanced menopause— who together with her husband, Michael are claiming parenthood to an incredible 13 of the alleged miracle babies.

Week-long independent investigations carried out by East African Standard reveal stunning discrepancies in the Unegbu and Nyeko testimonies. While both women claim they were denied medical attention in the UK, Unegbu in particular appears to have subverted attempts to establish whether or not she was pregnant. She would not be accompanied by her husband for what appeared to be an important blood test at an antenatal clinic, and lied about her yellow eyes even when a medical report confirmed she had sickle cell and probably jaundice owing to a liver condition. Unegbu and her husband live in different addresses in the UK. She wouldn’t show us her marriage papers and didn’t say they were separated. Both women almost became delirious during an interview when I put it to them that what they came in search for in Kenya wasn’t medical intervention.

Nyeko, on the other hand, was unable to produce evidence of the five alleged miscarriages she had suffered, had no plausible reason for bringing her children all the way back to Uganda, and was unable to say how British hospitals would deny their own citizens medical care. Nyeko argued, "In the UK you don’t leave children on their own." She wouldn’t say why she couldn’t leave the children with their father, a product designer, according to her, and an employee of a firm in Britain. Neither would she tell whom she left the children with in Uganda.

An ultrasound scan performed by North Middlesex University Hospital failed to confirm that Edith Unegbu, a British national of Nigerian extraction was pregnant. Unegbu, who is married to a John Ezedom of 8 Castleford Close, Haringey London, visited the hospital after being referred to the facility by her GP. Unegbu was patient No. NM 608855, according to records at the referral hospital. The ultrasound report faxed to us by Deya himself from his posh London address reveals that Unegbu’s uterus and ovaries were not seen, partly due to an under full bladder, and partly due to loaded loops of bowel. Comments on the report signed by a North Middlesex University Hospital doctor, also indicate that the Nigerian declined a vaginal scan after the ultrasound failed to confirm the alleged pregnancy. The report is dated November 28, 2003.

Unegbu, her eyes all yellow, denies she could be suffering from a liver condition, possibly jaundice. Last Thursday, during an interview with the East African Standard at I&M building in Nairobi, she blamed fatigue for her yellowing eyes even though the same ultrasound report, which failed to confirm the alleged pregnancy, did reveal that her liver was enlarged.

When she visited North Middlesex University Hospital, Unegbu gave the date of her last monthly period (LMP) as October 1, 2003. This put the gestational age of the alleged foetus growing inside her at eight weeks. Knowingly or otherwise Unegbu had turned up for the ultrasound scan with her bladder almost empty. Then, quite strangely, North Middlesex University Hospital staff went ahead with the ultrasound examination. Yesterday, radiologist Ondeko of Medical Imaging Services in Hurlingham, Nairobi explained that a full bladder is a requirement for ultrasound if the uterus and ovaries are to be seen. Unegbu’s uterus and ovaries, according to the university hospital’s report, were never seen. Then in a curious twist, Unegbu, who it would be presumed desperately wanted to establish she was pregnant, declined the only other procedure that could have confirmed her status –a transvaginal scan lending credence to a possible conspiracy to have the hospital find out the truth. The Deya’s are claiming medical science cannot detect the pregnancies, even though all the babies have allegedly been delivered at a clinic linked to the sect in Nairobi’s Huruma slums.

Unegbu would not return to North Middlesex University Hospital, a NHS Trust hospital, alleging insensitivity on the part of the staff to her plight and their alleged failure to find out if she was pregnant, saying in her heavy West African accent, "They just didn’t want to help me." It remains unclear if Unegbu went to North Middlesex University Hospital to defeat the very reason she was there –rule out her a pregnancy. Then allege science’s inability to detect the so-called miracle.

Nearly three months later on March, 4, 2004, Unegbu turned up at the prestigious Queen Elizabeth Hospital in search of what she late last week, during an acrimonious interview, referred to as a "second opinion". She was seen at the hospital’s antenatal haemoglobinopathy screening clinic alone, again contrary to standard medical practice that requires that both would-be parents be screened for the condition. The report of the blood test, which revealed that she is an active carrier of the sickle cell trait was signed by Salima Ali, the lead midwife. Unegbu went for the screening alone leaving behind her spouse, John Ezedom, who has filed a complaint with the Metropolitan Police over claims that his wife was assaulted by staff of the British High Commission in Nairobi. Interestingly, Unegbu lives on 36 Elndene Road, London SE 18, 64 B.

Archbishop Deya, however, availed no medical records for Miriam Nyeko, 40, who arrived in Nairobi via Kampala on July 15, 2004, slightly over a month ago. Like Unegbu, she also came to Nairobi to have her baby. Nyeko, who holds a British passport, says she joined Gilbert Deya Ministries in 2000, desperate to have someone help her out of an alleged recurrent miscarriage problem, for which she has no documented medical proof, but which she claims had started to threaten not just her marriage with a possible break-up, but also her physical and mental well-being. At the time she met Deya, Nyeko says she already had four children –three girls and a boy.

Then last year in March, three years after a rendezvous with the preacher, she was expecting once again.

The baby, born in a seedy clinic in sprawling Huruma on July 19, 2004, stayed in her mother’s womb for an unbelievable 16 months. In his wake, the infant, weighing 2kg at birth, left behind a rotting placenta having overstayed his welcome in the womb.

Unegbu and Nyeko have gone to great lengths trying to prove maternity. Nyeko has subjected herself to the indignity of giving birth to rolling video cameras.

On her part, Unegbu insisted that staff from British High Commission accompany her to one Mary Lucy’s clinic in Huruma to witness her giving birth. Deputy High Commissioner Ray Kyles says she had to be escorted out of the Embassy and denies anyone assaulted her.

But Unegbu insists that she was assaulted at the Embassy, before finally approaching the Kenya Red Cross to witness the birth. The Red Cross, however, denies any such involvement.

Writing to no one in particular, a Dr A R Essien of Plumstead Medical Center in the UK confirms seeing Unegbu, whom he has diagnosed with post-traumatic stress as a result of the assault.

"On the 27th of May 2004, she was beaten up in Nairobi-Kenya and dragged on the floor. Her right arm was twisted backwards and consequently she dislocated her wrist. She was pulled on the floor with extreme brutality even though she was pregnant. This act of assault is quite unacceptable by staff of British High Commission," writes Essien, who adds that he has documented the incident in his clinic notes for future reference and litigation. Bizarrely, Dr Essien himself admits that Unegbu’s pregnancy is a mystery to the medical profession.

The irony in this whole saga is that it is science – already roundly dismissed as inconsequential by Archbishop Gilbert Deya, a self-made millionaire living on the fast lane—that will determine his case. If DNA tests prove parentage, the outcome would certainly put to rest the suspicion that the miracle babies phenomenon could in fact be an elaborate plot to conceal a large scale child trafficking syndicate. Yet, if some or all of the DNA tests return negative then detectives will have latched onto perhaps the biggest child trafficking syndicate of our time.
http://www.eastandard.net/headlines/news20080407.htm
 

Mighty_Emperor

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And in an odd twist Archbishop Gilbert Deya goes a bit nuts:

'Miracle Babies': Deya's Bizarre Letter to Kibaki



The East African Standard (Nairobi)

August 24, 2004
Posted to the web August 23, 2004

Gitau Wa Njenga
London

Embattled Archbishop Gilbert Deya yesterday wrote a strong-worded bizarre letter to President Kibaki in which he accused him of child abuse and neglect.

In a five-page letter written in remarkably bad English and made available to the East African Standard in London, Deya claimed that his wife was being held in a filthy room and that the police had attempted to rape her. "These are all satanic regimes corroborated with hell, connected with the BBC radio and some evil politician in the government. Oh wicked generation!

"The hand of the wrath of God of Israel is upon you. You are so merciless to the infant mothers. You have snatched them on the street of Nairobi, you have brought a curse upon the nation."
warned Deya

Apparently infuriated by the arrest of his wife, the archbishop who is being investigated for child trafficking in the UK termed the Kenya police wicked and demonic and accused them of humiliating his wife.

"It is so shameful, I saw my wife and children being humiliated, tortured on the on-line newspaper (sic). The woman who use(d) to pray for Kenyans, highly respected, honoured by fellow Kenyans, is being tortured and humiliated. The wicked police are intending to rape her."

"My wife who is locked at Kileleshwa Police Station is in a very, very bad state. She is in a very filthy room, dirty and stinking. In the night one policeman attempted to rape her," claimed Deya in his letter to the president.

Deya said that because the government had failed to protect Mary Deya "a woman of God" the curse of God would befall the country.

The letter full of invective and cant accused the government of "throwing away the glory that God had planned" for the country. "Your wicked, demonic police, who might have been trained by the devil from hell are attempting to rape the holy Woman of God. Your unfaithful government have taken their evil hand, laid it upon my family and disgraced me and my children, Oh Kenya! You are doomed, you are cursed," warned Deya.

Deya claimed that he was a man of God through whom God worked and through whom Jesus Christ was proven as the saviour of mankind but that the country had rejected him.

"God brought his servant from you and gave you the light of the world, his son Jesus Christ, who died 2,000 years ago and has proved himself in his son, Gilbert Deya, but you have thrown your blessings away."

The archbishop who is at the center of child trafficking allegations charged that Satan had confused Kenya.

"Kenya, Kenya, Kenya. Why has Satan confused you? You throw away in the bin the glory which God had planned for your nation?".

He also claimed that his children had been degraded and forced into a lifestyle that is alien to them.

"My children are in unhealthy childcare. I am suspecting the type of food they are eating now, the type of water they are drinking and whether their lives are the style I have raised them. Be aware that my children are living a life higher than the care they have been taken to. They eat special food. They are used to their driver, Mr Ototo. They are used to their nannies, their toys and all this they are missing which might affect their future growth," he added.

He claimed that most of the children taken are his and that they can be identified by his daughter.

"Among the children taken, including the miracle babies, infant of Mrs Nyieko, Daniel and Joshua of Edith Ezedom, the rest of all those children are mine and they can be identified by my daughter Deborah and Peter Orwa the former Chairman of Africa Boxing Association.

"No stolen children were found in my house. It is a respected house, a holy house."

Deya said Mrs Odera, the woman who claims to have given birth miraculously, is seriously sick and possibly in labour. He asked that the police get his wife and a medical doctor to help Mrs Odera now before they "kill her".

Deya claimed that former President Daniel arap Moi knew him very well for many years and that they had shared meals with him. "Your Excellency, remember that the former President of the Republic of Kenya, Daniel arap Moi, has known me for several years. I sat together with him and had meals with him in the State House you are sitting in now. We met together with the pastors in Kenya in the State House and discussed the problems that were facing Kenya when they were about to become a democracy."

He claimed that he was instrumental in reconciling Jaramogi Oginga Odinga and the former President. This, he said, happened in Agip House when he went to talk to Oginga Odinga.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200408231510.html

The only suprise is that he didn't write in block capitals and threaten spurious legal action.
 

TheOriginalCujo

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I never realised that Beckjord was so religeous.
 

Kondoru

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Looks like the shits hitting the fan....

(I leave you to interpret that howsoever you may please...)
 

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Briton in 'miracle baby' charge
A British woman is among five people to appear in court in Kenya charged with stealing babies, embassy officials say.
Miriam Nyeko and four others were in court as police investigated an alleged child-smuggling network between the UK and Kenya, the British embassy said.

The accused are said to be linked to the controversial UK-based evangelist Gilbert Deya, who has denied involvement in child trafficking.

His wife Mary Juma Deya, Mrs Nyeko and three others all deny the charges.


Protective custody

A British embassy spokesman said on Tuesday he had seen no evidence to support reports another of those accused, Rose Kiseram, is also British.

The case centres on claims by Mr Deya's London-based organisation, the Gilbert Deya Ministries, that previously infertile couples are able to conceive thanks to miracles inspired by prayer.

Church leaders and medical experts fear the "miracle babies" are simply victims of child trafficking.

The Kenyan authorities have taken 21 children - some only a few weeks old - into protective custody.

Ten were seized from the Nairobi home of the Deyas and 11 from the residence of co-accused Edda and Michael Odera, who on Monday also denied charges of stealing babies.

The BBC's Muchiri Kioi in Nairobi said Mrs Nyeko, a British citizen of Nigerian origin, had cradled one of the so-called miracle babies in her arms as she appeared before magistrates.

DNA tests

Mrs Nyeko, Mrs Deya and Ms Kiseram pleaded not guilty to abducting a baby girl from a hospital in Nairobi in February.

Ms Nyeko claims to have given birth to a boy named Daniel in Kenya last month, thanks to Mr Deya's help.

Her husband, Charles, a product designer who lives in London, said earlier this month it was a "miracle from God" they did not understand but for which they were grateful.

Kenyan authorities have insisted on DNA tests to establish the boy's parentage - and the British embassy has refused to grant him a passport until they happen.

Both the Church of England and the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology urged the Metropolitan Police to investigate claims involving members of the Gilbert Deya Ministries.

The church has 36,000 members in the UK, as well as branches in Europe, Africa and Asia.

All five defendants are due back in court on 3 November.


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/africa/3614162.stm

Published: 2004/08/31 12:04:43 GMT

© BBC MMIV
 

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Kenya seeks 'miracle baby' pastor

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3617252.stm
Kenyan police say they have asked the British government to extradite the UK-based Kenyan evangelist, Gilbert Deya.
The pastor claims infertile UK couples are able to conceive after prayer and denies allegations that the "miracle babies" are stolen from Kenya.

On Monday, five people were charged by Kenyan police with stealing babies, including Mr Deya's wife, Mary.

The court had heard that Mary Deya told the police that she had given birth to nine children in a miraculous way.

DNA tests carried out on the children seized from her Nairobi home, show only one belongs to the Deyas.

The court also heard that another woman, Eddah Odera, claimed to have had 11 babies between 1999 and June of this year.

Eleven children were also seized from her house and DNA tests ruled out any links to her and her husband, Michael.

Hospital

Police say their investigations are now focused on Kenya's largest maternity hospital after 24 couples claimed their babies were stolen from the hospital immediately after birth.

Most say they were informed by the hospital authorities that their child had died shortly after birth.

...Both the Church of England and the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology have urged the Metropolitan Police to investigate claims involving members of the Gilbert Deya Ministries.
 

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Another similar report:

Friday, September 3, 2004

Kenya Has Problem With Stolen Babies

By TOM MALITI
Associated Press Writer



Investigators are focusing on Kenya's main maternity hospital, police said Wednesday, following allegations that some parents were told their newborns had died but the babies were really stolen by an international child trafficking ring.

Five people, including the wife of a London-based Kenyan preacher, were released on bail Wednesday after pleading innocent to charges involving two infants. Self-proclaimed archbishop Gilbert Deya had claimed the two were among children born as the result of miracles he performed on infertile women.

One of the babies was stolen in February from Nairobi's Pumwani Maternity Hospital and "it is the center of our investigations," police spokesman Jaspher Ombati said. No hospital employee has been charged so far.

Since the five suspects were detained last month, many couples have come forward seeking to claim the 20 children found with the suspects, saying their children disappeared from the hospital, Ombati told The Associated Press. DNA tests found that at least 17 of the children were not related to the adults arrested, authorities said.

Deya is a prime suspect in the case, Ombati added, noting the preacher blessed infertile or post-menopausal women and sent them to Kenya purportedly to give birth. The women claimed to have delivered babies in as little as two months and then applied to British authorities to take them back to London, he said.

In London, Deya told AP on Wednesday that all allegations against him were false.

"What is happening is a setup with the Kenyan authorities and the Church of England here in the U.K. ... because they are jealous of what I've done," said Deya, who has a home in Nairobi but has been successfully preaching in Britain since 1996.

A doctor, Katini Nzau-Ombaka, said there had been allegations of babies being stolen from Pumwani hospital for years but past investigations failed to uncover any problems. "I find it absolutely negligent of the medical board for this sort of scandal," he said.

In June, Kenya's Daily Nation ran a series of stories about women who didn't believe that their babies had died at Pumwani as they were told, and the newspaper raised questions about whether the children had been stolen.

The government responded by forming an investigative task force, which reported Aug. 9 it had found loopholes in hospital procedures that could allow babies to be stolen, although it said there was no tangible evidence such things had happened.


Prosecutor Moses Odoyo said the case has led to suspects in Britain, Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda and Kenya.

When police picked up Deya's wife, Mary Juma Deya, on Aug. 20 for questioning, they took nine children from her home and collected blood samples for DNA testing.

"One child was found a possible match. We have no doubt that's her kid," said John Maina, Kenya's head of forensic sciences.

He said the other tests, however, showed she was not the mother of six of the children and tests for the two others were inconclusive. He said police needed blood samples from Gilbert Deya to be sure.

The DNA profiles of two women detained with Mary Juma Deya - Rose Kiserem and Miriam Nyeko - did not match any of the nine children, Maina said.

Deya said in London that the children "are mine and my wife's, and if they say DNA doesn't match, I don't believe them."

On Aug. 17, the police picked up Michael and Eddah Odera and took 11 children that the couple claimed were theirs. Maina said tests showed none belonged to the Oderas.
http://www.timesdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040901/API/409010841
 

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Sat 18 Sep 2004


Coming to Scotland... church at centre of child-smuggling scandal

KAREN MCVEIGH


GILBERT Deya has had a busy week spreading the word. The millionaire African preacher has been in Belfast, then Glasgow, where he plans to set up a branch of his ministry, and is now back at his ramshackle warehouse in south-east London, leading services.

Wherever he goes, he insists that people are meeting the real Archbishop Deya, a God-fearing evangelist who has spent most of his life helping others. He is not a man who trafficks in babies.

Deya is the so-called "miracle baby" preacher who claims to bring fruit to the wombs of post-menopausal and infertile women through simple prayer. But authorities in Kenya believe the babies were, in fact, kidnapped from a maternity hospital in Nairobi.

In recent days, the row has deepened amid reports that he was in hiding in Scotland and had found legal representation here to contest arrest warrant moves to have him returned to the African country.

But, back at the headquarters of Gilbert Deya Ministries, one of Britain's fastest-growing evangelical churches, the cleric at the centre of child-trafficking allegations declared he was ready to face his accusers.

To date, the former Pepe jeans salesman has been charged with one offence - stealing a baby from a maternity hospital in Kenya on 5 February this year. In itself, it is serious enough. According to Kenyan police, it is just the tip of the iceberg. They suspect him of being involved in a child-trafficking racket that spans five countries: Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda and Britain.

The clinic at the heart of Deya’s "miracle baby" scheme, the run-down Mama Lucy Maternity Hospital in Kenya where his "mothers-to-be" travel from Britain and elsewhere to give birth, has been shut down. Another, the Pimwani Maternity Hospital, on the outskirts of Nairobi, the biggest and one of the poorest hospitals in East Africa, and the one from where Deya is alleged to have stolen a baby, is also being investigated after claims of corruption, neglect and even murder.

In Britain, Scotland Yard and the Home Office also have the preacher in their sights after allegations about his activities made in a BBC documentary. He also faces an investigation by the Charities Commission. Any day now, Kenya’s attorney-general is expected to sign an international warrant for his arrest, based on the offence for which he has been charged.

But as the day of his arrest approaches, Deya, whose wife, Mary Juma, has also been charged with stealing a child in Kenya, told The Scotsman that he was confident he would be found not guilty of all charges. They were but a distraction from his real work, he said, which was spreading the word of God.

And he rejected reports that he had gone to ground in Scotland. "Why should I run away to Scotland? It is part of Britain," he said. "I am at liberty to go wherever I want, nobody can control what I do."

He said that, in the past few days, he had spent time preaching in "many churches" in Belfast, and also spent some time with his Scottish lawyer, Aamer Anwar, in Glasgow.

Deya, 52, insists he has a cast-iron alibi for the charge against him. He is accused of stealing and harbouring a baby from Ms Elizabeth Njeri at the Pumwani Maternity Hospital. The charge sheet further states that he harboured the child, knowing it had been stolen.

He said that, on that day, he was not in Kenya but in the UK, and would cite immigration records at Jomo Kenyatta and Heathrow airports as evidence of his claim. "I went to Kenya on 6 January and my passport was rubber-stamped. I left on 16 January."

Deya, who said he counted Kenya’s previous president, Daniel arap Moi, among his congregation, said the allegations against him were a plot by the Kenyan authorities to destroy him. "The Kenyan people are jealous and want to do a character assassination on my ministry. I was so close to the previous president, Moi. If you look at my website you will see pictures."

On his website, http://www.deyaministries.com, there are photographs of Deya meeting Mr Moi, as well as him meeting the Queen and Prince Philip in 2002. Buckingham Palace has said it was "unfortunate" if Deya suggested he had any link to the Queen.

Gilbert Deya Ministries has 14 branches in the UK, with five more planned for Edinburgh, Glasgow, Watford, Leicester and Wales. He is a millionaire who has three homes, a private jet and an armour-plated Mercedes. He has just bought the building that houses his London HQ for £1 million.

The two-storey warehouse, sandwiched between a gas works and a railway line, just a stone’s throw from Millwall Football Club, seems an unlikely place for miracles. Yet it is here, in South Bermondsey, that Deya works his magic through the Lord, healing the sick, casting out devils and - most questionably - making infertile or post-menopausal women pregnant.

Deya claimed that the baby he is alleged to have stolen was his own, Naomi Deya, one of twins born to his wife on 20 January this year. "The other twin, Jerimiah, died in July and we buried him in Langata cemetery in Nairobi," he said. When asked why the DNA of the baby did not match that of his wife, he said this was all part of the Kenyan plot to destroy him. "This is propaganda, the government is against me. I cannot trust them. The DNA test ought to be done in London. It needs to be done with my wife, myself and Jerimiah."

He said he was more than willing to take part in DNA tests, as long as they were carried out in Britain. But when asked what would happen if the DNA did not match, he quickly changed his tune. "DNA is what the world, not God, believes in. If it matches or doesn’t match, it’s the same."

In previous conversations, he has said he is not surprised that the DNA of many of the babies don’t match the mothers because they are miracles.

"Let the learned in science and technology investigate," he said. "I’m neither a magician nor a witchdoctor, just a religious man who is very effective."

He uses a similar argument when asked why, before they travel to Kenya, the mothers-to-be fail pregnancy tests and their pregnancies do not show up on scans.

"It is a miracle, and miracles cannot be explained. It is nothing to do with me. I pray and their wombs are coming big and they are pregnant. They can question the Bible that believes in miracles, they can question God who performs them, but don’t question me. To me my work is fulfilling the Bible. The Bible says: ‘Go and cast out devils.’ Mark 15:16, Chapter 10. I cast out devils and, through deliverance, women become pregnant."

Deya claims he is innocent of all allegations and will sue anyone who says otherwise. Furthermore, he says his life would be in danger if he were extradited to Kenya. He alleged that his mother, Monica nono Deya, had gone missing, that his wife was threatened with rape in police custody - all symptomatic of the plot against him, he said.

"I’m more than innocent," he said, "I have only done spiritual work, I would never be involved in anything which is outside the will of God. We are taking the case against them, we are suing the BBC for fabricating lies against my ministry, we will sue the Kenyan agencies, and I will sue you, too, if you print fabrications against me."

He claims that he cannot get a fair trial in Kenya, one of the key points in the case that human rights lawyer Mr Anwar is building against any extradition order.

Mr Anwar pointed to a recent report on Kenya, showing 50 per cent of the judiciary to be corrupt, and to what he said was prejudicial reporting on the case. "In that environment, I don’t think he would receive a fair trial," he said.

In a twist to an already extraordinary story, it has emerged that the chief investigating officer, whom Deya says told him that the charges against him would be dropped, was shot dead at his house last month.

Deya said: "It is very strange that the police officer who investigated the case, and was going to drop the charges, was murdered by thugs."

Back in Kenya, the investigation continues. News filters through of breakthroughs - allegedly linking the babies to couples who have lost their children. One of the children which Mrs Odera claimed to have borne reportedly ran up to his real parents, from Meru, Kenya, after recognising them. The three are now being DNA tested.

In the midst of this, however, Deya remains resolutely defiant.

"My accusers have changed their story," he said. "If I have trafficked babies, where are these babies, where are the people who bought them? Where is the evidence?"

When asked what effect the negative publicity had had on his flock, he laughed, for the first time during the interview. "It has increased my congregation. We have 36,000 members. Even lapsed members have come back. I don’t talk to them about these things, they know I am innocent. God knows the truth."
http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=1095802004
 

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Court to Rule on 'Miracle Babies' Case

Thu Nov 11, 2004 11:59 AM ET


LONDON (Reuters) - A British High Court judge will rule Friday whether a child born after its mother was prayed over by a self-styled bishop of an unregulated church is truly a "miracle baby" or a victim of child trafficking.

The case comes after authorities in Kenya accused the London-based church of being part of an international baby-snatching ring, responsible for abducting more than 20 children and passing them off as the miraculous offspring of infertile women.

Kenyan authorities are seeking the extradition of Gilbert Deya, a Britain-based Kenyan preacher who claims to have used the power of prayer to make infertile women bear "miracle babies."

The allegations have exposed what commentators on religion describe as a murky world of money, politics and the occult that at times has hijacked an evangelical revival among Britain's burgeoning African diaspora.

Deya, now in Scotland, says he is innocent and insists the "miracles" are bona fide. His lawyers are fighting his extradition, saying he could not receive a fair trial in Kenya.

A statement from the High Court said Friday's judgment is concerned with "whether the claim that a child was a miracle baby is true or whether the child concerned has been a victim international child trafficking."

----------------
© Reuters 2004. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=oddlyEnoughNews&storyID=6788402
 

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Update

http://ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGBO6YRLG1E.html
'Miracle Baby' Actually Was Victim of Child Traffickers, British Judge Rules

By Jill Lawless Associated Press Writer
Published: Nov 12, 2004

LONDON (AP) - An infertile Nigerian couple who believed a self-styled preacher's claim that their child was miraculously conceived were really the victim of greedy international child traffickers, a British judge ruled Friday.
Relying on DNA evidence, Judge Ernest Ryder said the couple who claimed to be parents of the 1-year-old boy were victims of "a cruel deception to further the financial ends of those involved."

Ryder said he found that Gilbert Deya, a London-based Kenyan preacher who claims to have helped infertile women conceive "miracle babies" by praying for them, was a "self-serving and superficial" witness.

The judge said the baby's supposed mother, identified only as Mrs. E, "was deceived into thinking that she had given birth. She was seriously assaulted and a live child who had been born to another family was presented to her as her child."

Ryder ruled that the baby, identified only as C, was not the child of Mr. and Mrs. E, who live in Britain, and ordered "an urgent investigation" to find his real parents.

Ryder acknowledged that the couple were "good and loving carers of the child," but said "if C's future care is founded upon a lie, he will likely suffer profound harm."

The judge dismissed Deya's claims that C and several other children were born through divine intervention, saying, "Mr. Deya is economical with the truth."

Mingling with dozens of supporters outside the courtroom, Deya accused Ryder of religious discrimination. He said Kenyan authorities are persecuting him because of his ties to the country's former ruler, Daniel arap Moi.

"This is not my own doing. It is God's doing," Deya said. "As they are judging us, more miracles are happening."

Mrs. E believed 22 "miracle" babies had been born to Deya's followers, and she believes she is pregnant again, Ryder said.

Kenyan officials in early September said they were investigating Nairobi's Pumwani Maternity Hospital following allegations some parents were told their newborns had died, but the babies were stolen. Many couples who say their infants disappeared from the hospital have sought to claim the 20 children found with the suspects.

Deya, the prime suspect in the case, denies the allegations and is fighting extradition to Kenya. His wife has pleaded innocent to charges of stealing two infants. Four other people face similar charges.

Nairobi police spokesman Jaspher Ombati has said the preacher blessed infertile or post-menopausal women and sent them to Kenya, purportedly to give birth. The women claimed to have delivered babies in as little as two months and then applied to British authorities to take them back to London, he said.

Concerns were raised in England after British media reported that babies were being "born" to British women after they had visited backstreet clinics in slums in Nairobi. British authorities took C into care after tests showed his DNA did not match that of his supposed parents.

Unable to conceive, Mr. and Mrs. E had sought help from Gilbert Deya Ministries, "an eclectic mix of traditional African custom and charismatic Christian belief," Ryder said.

Mrs. E soon reported symptoms of pregnancy, although tests at London clinics proved negative. Mrs. E. testified that she then traveled to Kenya, where she gave birth to C and two other children at clinics in Nairobi between September 2003 and June 2004.

Ryder said Mrs. E described receiving injections for presumed labor pains from people she believed to be doctors, who examined her.

He said she did not see the moment of childbirth, but "in each case the child was held up for her to see, was wrapped up, and then removed."

Although Deya did not ask Mr. and Mrs. E for money, the judge said the "miracle births" were a key to Deya's fund-raising through his congregation.

Gilbert Deya Ministries calls itself an international religious ministry that began in Kenya. It operates churches in London, Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool and Nottingham and says it has 34,000 followers in Britain.

In September the Charities Commission, Britain's charity watchdog, froze the bank accounts of Gilbert Deya Ministries while it investigates the group's use of funds, its fund-raising and its publicity.
 

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'Miracle baby' mother 'tortured'

'Miracle baby' mother 'tortured'
A lawyer for the wife of a Kenyan pastor accused of child trafficking has accused police of torturing her.
Mary Deya, 57, was arrested on Saturday after saying she had given birth - claims denied by local doctors.

Lawyer Cliff Ombeta has filed a legal request for her to be released or brought to court and charged. He says she should be charged within 24 hours.

UK-based televangelist Gilbert Deya says he can make infertile women pregnant through prayer.

Mr Ombeta told the BBC that Mrs Deya had been "tortured" and manhandled by the police.

"What she needs right now is medical attention. The police are not doing that at the moment. They have actually denied her food and water for the last 24 hours."

Ante-natal classes

On her claims to have given birth, he told the Daily Nation newspaper:

"She often dresses in African outfits and I have not been able to figure out if she was pregnant or not."


She arrived at the Nairobi hospital early on Saturday morning with a baby still attached to the placenta, said the hospital's chief executive officer Dr Cleopa Mailu.
She was treated and then transferred to a different hospital, where Mrs Deya said she had been attending ante-natal classes.

Police say she will be charged with child theft and giving false information.

Kenyan police allege the Gilbert Deya Ministries is an international baby-snatching ring and have asked the UK government to extradite Mr Deya.

They say their investigation revolves around the disappearance of babies from Nairobi's Pumwani Maternity Hospital and involves suspects in Britain, Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda and Kenya.

A year ago, they took 20 of Mr Deya's "miracle babies" into care in Nairobi after they were found to have no genetic link to the women claiming to be their mothers.

The pastor denies involvement in child trafficking and his lawyer says his client will not receive a fair trial if he is extradited to Kenya.

Gilbert Deya is now based in Glasgow and is claiming political asylum in Scotland.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/w ... 238746.stm

Published: 2005/09/12 16:25:47 GMT

© BBC MMV
 

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Kenyan cult leader claims Catholic conspiracy

Kenyan cult leader, facing child-trafficking charges, claims a Catholic conspiracy

Nairobi, Sep. 12 (CWNews.com) - A bizarre story involving the alleged sale of newborn babies has re-surfaced in Kenya, with the arrest of a woman who claimed to have miraculously given birth to a baby boy.

Gilbert Deya, a Kenyan preacher now living in England who styles himself as an "archbishop," has long claimed that barren women will conceive children when he prays over them. These claims have met stiff resistance from authorities in Kenya, who believe that Deya is somehow obtaining children from their natural parents, and selling them abroad under the guise of miraculous pregnancies.

On September 10 the preacher's wife, May Deya, drove to a Nairobi hospital with a newborn infant, claiming that she had delivered the child miraculously on her way to the hospital. After examining the baby, doctors determined that Mary Deya, who is 58 years old, could not be the mother. They then called police, who took Mrs. Deya into custody.

This was the Deyas' second direct clash with Kenyan law-enforcement authorities. In 2004, police discovered 21 babies at a home run by the Deya couple. While the Deyas claimed that the babies were miraculously given to them by God, 40 parents came forward to claim the children, saying that their babies had been stolen.

Gilbert Deya, who to date has escaped arrest on child-trafficking charges, claims that he now lives in England because he was forced out of his native Kenya by a Catholic conspiracy, led by Archbishop Raphael Ndingi Mwana'a Nzeki of Nairobi. "I was chased by men with guns," he insists.

http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=39563
 

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Kenyan 'miracle baby' pastor held

Gilbert Deya denies he is involved in child trafficking
A Kenyan evangelist who claimed to have created miraculous pregnancies through the power of prayer has been arrested in London by British police.
A police spokesman said Gilbert Deya had been detained under an arrest warrant issued by Kenyan authorities, who charged him with child trafficking.

In Kenya, 20 babies went into care when DNA tests showed they were not related to women claiming to be their mothers.

A UK court will now have to decide whether Mr Deya can be extradited.

Mr Deya denies accusations that he ran a child-trafficking ring on the pretext of praying for his followers to conceive via miraculous powers.

He runs a number of churches in UK cities.

Kenyan police allege the Gilbert Deya Ministries is an international baby-snatching ring and last year asked the UK government to extradite Mr Deya.

They say their investigation revolves around the disappearance of babies from Nairobi's Pumwani Maternity Hospital and involves suspects in Britain, Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda and Kenya.

His arrest warrant was issued after the arrest of his wife, Mary, in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, last year.

She arrived at a hospital with a newborn baby to which she claimed to have given birth, but doctors who examined Mrs Deya, aged 57 at the time, said her claim of recently having given birth was false.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6176863.stm
 

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Now imagine the fuss if WHITE people were involved in this...
 

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Kenya 'miracle baby' wife jailed

Mrs Deya's husband says he aids infertile couples by prayer
The wife of Kenyan pastor Gilbert Deya accused of child trafficking has been sentenced to two years in jail by a Nairobi court for stealing a child.
Mary Deya claimed that one of her two accomplices had given birth to the child, but the court proved the woman was not the biological mother.

"The actions and claims of miraculous birth deserve no mercy," Magistrate Teresia Ngugi said.

Kenya has requested the extradition of UK-based evangelist Mr Deya.

No amount of the sentence can undo the damage done to the life of the child

Magistrate Teresia Ngugi

He runs a number of churches in UK cities and says he aids infertile couples by prayer.

Kenyan police allege the Gilbert Deya Ministries is an international baby-snatching ring, allegations Mr Deya denies.

Some children were taken into care in Kenya when DNA tests showed they were not related to women claiming to be their mothers.

"No amount of the sentence can undo the damage done to the life of the child who may never know who his biological parents are," said Ms Ngugi is quoted by Kenya's Daily Nation as saying.

Mrs Deya's co-accused - Miriam Nyeko and Rose Kiserem - were also jailed for two years.

The women claimed that Ms Nyeko, who is a British citizen, had given birth to the baby boy.

She was sentenced to another one year in prison - to run concurrently - for obtaining a false birth certificate.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6707107.stm
 

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Well it seems somethings being done.

but they got let off very lightly
 

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'Miracle babies' pastor in UK despite extradition
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/engl ... 598317.stm

By Jon Douglas
Face the Facts, BBC Radio 4

Gilbert Deya

A self-styled archbishop who claimed he could give infertile couples 'miracle babies' is still living and working in the UK despite his extradition to Kenya being ordered three years ago.

The Home Office has said it is still considering representations from Gilbert Deya's solicitors that sending him to Kenya would breach his human rights.

His appeal against extradition failed in October 2008 and he was refused leave to appeal to the House of Lords.

Mr Deya is wanted on child abduction charges in Kenya where the government alleges he stole five children between 1999 and 2004.

And it was in 2004 that BBC Radio 4's investigative programme, Face the Facts, first looked into Gilbert Deya and the so-called miracle babies.

The programme heard how women attending Gilbert Deya's church services in Peckham, South London were told they would be having babies even though, in some cases, doctors had told them they were not pregnant or they were infertile.

'Beyond human imagination'

The babies were always delivered in Kenya, in backstreet clinics away from prying eyes where poor local mothers were sometimes willing to give up a child they could not afford to feed.

Interviewed for Face the Facts in 2004 and asked how he explained the births of children with DNA different to that of their alleged parents, Gilbert Deya said: "The miracle babies which are happening in our ministry are beyond human imagination".

"It is not something I can say I can explain because they are of God and things of God can not be explained by a human being".

Today Mr Deya is not so keen to speak to the BBC.

A call to his offices in London resulted in him telling us the BBC was "evil" for what had been broadcast about him previously. He told us never to call him again.

He's not always media shy, happy to appear on his own TV channel, Deya Broadcasting Network, which screens his church services and phone-ins via satellite TV across Africa and Europe.

I really am shocked and deeply concerned that he has not yet made his way to Kenya
Tottenham MP David Lammy

Music videos of Archbishop Gilbert Deya dancing and singing can also be found on You Tube.

Financial accounts for his charity, Gilbert Deya Ministries, have not been filed with the Charity Commission and are overdue.

But those for the year ending December 2007 show an income of over £1.1m, almost all of it through donations.

Gilbert Deya's wife Mary has served a jail sentence for child abduction in Kenya. She's now facing fresh charges.

But almost a year and a half after her husband's appeal against extradition to Kenya failed, he's still on UK soil, much to the dismay of the Tottenham MP, David Lammy, whose constituents were caught up in the 'miracle baby' case.

"I really am shocked and deeply concerned that he has not yet made his way to Kenya.

"I don't know why he is still here," he said.

Mr Lammy added: "It is my understanding that there have been successive legal attempts to avoid that extradition but I will be writing again to the home secretary about this case because it is important many years later that justice is delivered for these young children who should not have been taken from their natural families".

The Home Office told us "the Secretary of State has a duty to ensure that extradition does not breach the European Convention on Human Rights" and representations from Mr Deya's lawyers "are being considered."

You can hear more on this story on You & Yours on BBC Radio 4 live from 12pm today (Thursday 1st April 2010) or later via BBC iPlayer.
 

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'Miracle babies' pastor to be extradited to Kenya
By Jon Douglas
You and Yours, BBC Radio 4

An evangelist who claimed to have created miraculous pregnancies through prayer is to be sent back to Kenya to face child abduction charges.
Gilbert Deya has fought a legal battle to stay in the UK since 2007, arguing anything else would breach his human rights.
Now the home secretary Theresa May has decided his extradition should go ahead.
The Kenyan government alleges he stole five children between 1999 and 2004.

Concerns were first aired about Mr Deya's conduct on the BBC Radio 4 investigative programme, Face the Facts in 2004.
Infertile or post-menopausal women who attended his church in Peckham, South London were told they would be having "miracle" babies.
But the babies were always "delivered" in backstreet clinics in Nairobi.

The Tottenham MP, David Lammy, had a husband and wife turn up at his constituency surgery who had been through it.
"The couple went to Africa, came back into the country with a child that the authorities found out was not theirs through a DNA test.

"What unravelled was clearly a child trafficking situation, that didn't just involve my constituents, but involved a number of women making their way to Kenya and then arriving back into our country apparently thinking these children were theirs but they clearly were not," he said.

Gilbert Deya was interviewed on Face the Facts in 2004.
When asked how he explained the births of children with DNA different to that of their alleged parents, he said: "The miracle babies which are happening in our ministry are beyond human imagination.
"It is not something I can say I can explain because they are of God and things of God cannot be explained by a human being."

In 2007, the then home secretary, Jacqui Smith decided Mr Deya should be extradited to Kenya.
His appeal against that decision at the High Court failed and he was refused permission to take his case to the House of Lords.
And while the legal wranglings have continued Gilbert Deya has remained in the UK running what appears to be a successful charity, and broadcasting to Africa and Europe on his satellite TV channel, Deya Broadcasting Network.

The latest available accounts for his charity, Gilbert Deya Ministries, date back to 2009 and show an income from voluntary donations of more than £1.2m. :shock:
The charity's stated purpose is to "advance the Christian religion". On its website it claims to have 34,000 followers with churches in Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham, Leicester and London.

Mr Deya's wife, Mary, has already been jailed in Kenya for child abduction.
In a statement the Home Office said: "He has exhausted all avenues of appeal against extradition under the Extradition Act."

You can hear more on You & Yours on BBC Radio 4 from 12:00 Wednesday 21st September 2011 or catch up via BBC iPlayer.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14992891
 

ramonmercado

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A self-proclaimed "Archbishop" is selling olive oil from Aldi as a miracle cure for cancer and HIV, it has been claimed.

Gilbert Deya, 63, a Kenyan preacher who calls himself the Archbishop of Peckham, is selling the £1.99 750ml budget supermarket product in his church shop in south London for £5, according to The Sun.

He claims to have "anointed" the oil and suggests that if used on food, it can make cancer "disappear"

Deya, who runs Gilbert Deya Ministries- which is said to have a UK membership of 36,000 - also claims that he can give infertile couples "miracle babies".

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/new...ng-Aldi-olive-oil-as-miracle-cancer-cure.html
 

rynner2

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Gilbert Deya obviously took "Fools and Horses" as Gospel! :p

Remember the Peckham Spring Water affair? :D

Or the mass production of pre-blessed communion wine! :evil:
 
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