The Good Stuff Online Thread

Yithian

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In 1949, Tom Riley is arrested for the murder of PC George Dixon. As he awaits interrogation at the station, he is mysteriously transported into an episode of The Filth - a 1988 police series where the hard men rule. Starring Sean Chapman, Ian Brimble, Karl Johnson as PC Taffy Hughes, John Woodvine and Kenneth Cranham. Directed by Guy Slater.

 

escargot

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In 1949, Tom Riley is arrested for the murder of PC George Dixon. As he awaits interrogation at the station, he is mysteriously transported into an episode of The Filth - a 1988 police series where the hard men rule. Starring Sean Chapman, Ian Brimble, Karl Johnson as PC Taffy Hughes, John Woodvine and Kenneth Cranham. Directed by Guy Slater.

We saw that on its first broadcast.
 

Yithian

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Margaret Rutherford’s true life story is in fact much more eccentric than the most famous fictional role she ever played: Miss Jane Marple – Agatha Christie’s amateur sleuth. Rutherford’s version was the very first appearance of Miss Marple on the big screen and it was far removed though from the petite, upper middle-class lady in the detective novels. Rutherford’s Marple was the personification of an English spinster, a bumbling hobby snooper, a know-it-all with an imposing jaunty stature. Margaret Rutherford made her grand stage debut at 33. But it was in the role of Miss Prism in Oscar Wilde’s camp social commentary “The Importance Of Being Earnest“ that Rutherford was taken seriously by the critics. Her first cinema success was in “Blithe Spirit“ in 1945, where she plays Madame Arcati, an eccentric medium. In 1963 she won an Oscar and a Golden Globe for her role in “The V.I.P.s” – one of the best ever performances by Margaret Rutherford. In more than 40 films and over 100 stage plays, Margaret Rutherford’s magic lay in her incredible talent for perfect comic timing together with her completely idiosyncratic and unique looks. Today the Miss Marple films are constantly repeated on television worldwide seems to make clear that there is still a huge interest in this eccentric character actress. Margaret Rutherford’s private life and family history is even more colourful, tragic and stranger than any filmwriter could possibly imagine. It is almost identical to an Agatha Christie crime novel with a murder, suicide, madness, changes of identity, dark hidden secrets and fraud. The films follows clues and unearth new evidence in not only London but in Chalfont St. Peter, Denham and Amersham in Buckinghamshire – sleepy villages where there is plenty to hide. Interview partners are Andy Merriman, biographer, 95 year old Gwen Robyns, ghost-writer of Margaret’s autobiography (1972), Tony Benn, her cousin and left-wing Labour politician, actress and comedian June Whitfield, painter Michael Noakes, famous for his royal portraits and character actress and best friend, Damaris Hayman.

 

escargot

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A famous outtake from the original The Blue Lamp series.

A character keeps trying to say 'Dock Green nick' and comes up with Dock Green Dick and Dick Green Dock. Deserves an Oscar for keeping a straight face.

Edit: I actually laughed till I cried just now at this, first time I'd seen it.
 
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Ogdred Weary

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Kaiju-esque music video, the song is OK, can't say I'd be bothered without the visuals. Impressive on what I assume was a very low budget.

 

Timble2

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In 1949, Tom Riley is arrested for the murder of PC George Dixon. As he awaits interrogation at the station, he is mysteriously transported into an episode of The Filth - a 1988 police series where the hard men rule. Starring Sean Chapman, Ian Brimble, Karl Johnson as PC Taffy Hughes, John Woodvine and Kenneth Cranham. Directed by Guy Slater.

Since George Dixon died in 1950, in 'The Blue Lamp', should the entire series of 'Dixon of Dock Green' (1955 to 1976) be regarded as a prequel to "Life on Mars" and "Ashes to Ashes"

Which is set in a sort of limbo for police officers who've died before their time and still have unresolved issues. George Dixon signs off the final episode.
 

Mythopoeika

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I remember reading that Jack Warner, in his dotage, took to camping around in his unauthorized police uniform and clipping the ears of any young scamps who crossed his path! :pipe:
Those were the days, when fake policemen were better than the real police of today...
 

JamesWhitehead

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I think that's also the solution in the early Cliff Richard pic, Serious Charge. Or maybe the Bobby just delivers the perp. to his dad for the thrashing. :bhave:
 

Spudrick68

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For a long time I have been looking for a copy of The Whisperer In Darkness film made in 2011. I came across a site called HDBest which had a copy of it for watching. I haven't watched it yet, but the credits at the end mentions that amongst the characters is Charles Fort.

I hope to watch this tomorrow.
 

hunck

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An interesting vid from Nottingham Uni about Plutonium.

It's mainly about extracting the Plutonium from spent reactor fuel for re-use. Ends up with a good story of a scientist working with entire stock of British Plutonium during WWll, which amounted to 10mg at the time, being so tired he spilled it all on a table, & his method of recovery.

 

Mythopoeika

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JamesWhitehead

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We don't appear to have a thread on the horrid subject of Premature Burial, though I think the matter was much discussed on threads about vampires etc.

Here is a grimly-entertaining page which views the subject through some morbid postcards, which now require explaining.

I was investigating the old and politically-incorrect music-hall song, "I wouldn't leave my little wooden hut for you!" Illustrators seized on the chance to give the title, really about cannibals, a Poe-like twist or two. It is interesting to see Harry Clarke's distortion of the coffin shape inspiring much later film posters.

I also like the meat-canning twist, though "wooden" does not fit the tin very well! Upton Sinclair was raising a stink about the meat-packing industry in 1906, by which time the song was already ten years old.

All this in the context of a blog mainly about Anton Walbrook. :)
 
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