The Good Stuff Online Thread

Swifty

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That sounds like Shooting Star's Angelos Epithemiou.
It might be .. from memory there's a few radio clips of Barry out there online. I think he was a real bloke that tormented this radio DJ and reached cult status .. from memory ..
 

Tin

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It might be .. from memory there's a few radio clips of Barry out there online. I think he was a real bloke that tormented this radio DJ and reached cult status .. from memory ..
I think you're right it's a real person, god knows how the DJ kept his cool.
 
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I watched these a few months ago and found them highly entertaining (there are about 7 episodes, I think).

One man walks across Wales in a straight line. He must stick to the line at all costs, although I think he allows himself 10 metres leeway in difficult situations. There are only mountains, rivers, lakes, fences, hedges, forests and farmers in his way.

 

Tin

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I watched these a few months ago and found them highly entertaining (there are about 7 episodes, I think).

One man walks across Wales in a straight line. He must stick to the line at all costs, although I think he allows himself 10 metres leeway in difficult situations. There are only mountains, rivers, lakes, fences, hedges, forests and farmers in his way.

That was a great series, Geowizard is a funny guy.
 

escargot

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I watched these a few months ago and found them highly entertaining (there are about 7 episodes, I think).

One man walks across Wales in a straight line. He must stick to the line at all costs, although I think he allows himself 10 metres leeway in difficult situations. There are only mountains, rivers, lakes, fences, hedges, forests and farmers in his way.

This is what I used to want to do as a kid!
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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I watched these a few months ago and found them highly entertaining (there are about 7 episodes, I think).

One man walks across Wales in a straight line. He must stick to the line at all costs, although I think he allows himself 10 metres leeway in difficult situations. There are only mountains, rivers, lakes, fences, hedges, forests and farmers in his way.

I thought it would be interesting but to be honest I gave up after a few minutes as I couldn't stand the bloke's incessant swearing.
 

Yithian

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Look at this... how exceptionally clear the footage is. Amazing.

(Disclaimer: I watched this with the sound off cos Mr Zebra is watching telly, so I can't vouch for what the music is like).

Fascinating to watch.

And 1901?

A great many of those (roughly) 6-10 year-olds you are watching playing with and for the camera ended up fighting the Great War.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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Fascinating to watch.

And 1901?

A great many of those (roughly) 6-10 year-olds you are watching playing with and for the camera ended up fighting the Great War.

They would indeed.

One of the comments on the video says:
Some of the older people in this clip met individuals who were born in the 1700s when they were younger. Some of the younger ones heard The Beatles
... takes a minute to wrap one's mind around, but it's true. Any 60-odd-year-olds in that video would have been born in the 1840s, say. Their parents would have been born in the 1700s. And some of the younger ones, after fighting in the Great War (if they survived of course) could well have survived into the 1960s.

:wide:
 

Peripart

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One of the comments ... takes a minute to wrap one's mind around, but it's true. Any 60-odd-year-olds in that video would have been born in the 1840s, say. Their parents would have been born in the 1700s. And some of the younger ones, after fighting in the Great War (if they survived of course) could well have survived into the 1960s.

:wide:
It does make you think, doesn't it?

It recalls a fact I read (pretty sure that it was in a very early Guinness Book of Records, but haven't ever been able to find it again*) that the last person with a parent born in the 18th century died in the early 1960s or thereabouts. It sounds impossible, but I don't think it is - men have been known to father children well into their 70s, so a man born in 1799 could have had a son or daughter born in 1870, who then lived into their 90s.


*If any of you enterprising folk can verify this anecdotal factoid, I would be extremely grateful!
 

Tin

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It does make you think, doesn't it?

It recalls a fact I read (pretty sure that it was in a very early Guinness Book of Records, but haven't ever been able to find it again*) that the last person with a parent born in the 18th century died in the early 1960s or thereabouts. It sounds impossible, but I don't think it is - men have been known to father children well into their 70s, so a man born in 1799 could have had a son or daughter born in 1870, who then lived into their 90s.


*If any of you enterprising folk can verify this anecdotal factoid, I would be extremely grateful!
Can't help I'm afraid but I remember reading in an annual when I was young that, if we'd never had the written word, tales of Jesus could have been passed down through the generations and at the minimum the tales would only have to be repeated 25 times. :pop:
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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It does make you think, doesn't it?

It recalls a fact I read (pretty sure that it was in a very early Guinness Book of Records, but haven't ever been able to find it again*) that the last person with a parent born in the 18th century died in the early 1960s or thereabouts. It sounds impossible, but I don't think it is - men have been known to father children well into their 70s, so a man born in 1799 could have had a son or daughter born in 1870, who then lived into their 90s.


*If any of you enterprising folk can verify this anecdotal factoid, I would be extremely grateful!
Frustratingly I cannot source your exact example, but I did come across this lady,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Ann_Neve

whose life spanned three centuries, 1792 to 1903!
 
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