The Human Insect Mind!

Xanatic*

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#31
Plenty of species see in colour. I'd wager there's more species that do than don't. Some of them see a lot more colours than we do.
 
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#32
Most other species on earth don't see in colour, except maybe for Cuttle Fish.
I would disagree with this Jim. It's surprising how many animals have colour vision, even non-mammals, that is in some cases better than humans. A lot of birds for instance rely heavily on colour for display and certain reptiles like geckos and chameleons as well. Insects may be poorer than us at seeing red, but they can see ultra-violet light, which we can't.
 

JimELUCIER

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#33
Thank you Davidplankton, and Xanatic. I forgot to mention the special bandwidth in which we see all colours of the rainbow. If we were to see in Ultraviolet, or see colours at some animals, and Insects might, it would have greatly altered our entire species to a point of being unrecognizable. I mean we use colour modification of hues to judge distance, and all other spatial dimensions. The very narrow colour band that we see through is so perfect that any deviation, no matter how small would have greatly affected our evolution. All this brings up the point, do different colour bands inherited through the generations influence intelligence? If we could see in ultraviolet would that have affected the development of our creations, and tools over the many thousands of years? Is it possible that our specialized eyes that see in a perfect band of brilliant colours be a much more important faculty to our modern "Space Age" then ever thought.?
 

Xanatic*

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#35
Around 8% of men are colour blind. The rest of us barely notice that, it seems to make no difference for their intelligence or tool use. The fact that colour blindness is so common, indicates that which spectrum we see has had little to say regarding our evolution.
 

JimELUCIER

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#37
Yes, Xanatic. I agree. Adding, in theory that I am talking about Genetic inheritance over hundreds of generations. The so called 8% maybe Intelligent Evolutions way of improving our defects into new kinds of Intelligent Evolution. For example, we are the New Intelligent Evolution. For example in a few years, blind people will be able to see through Artificial Technologies. In a decade or more, there will be no such thing as Blindness. You will need to see the latest in technologies to know what I mean, maybe. As many MATRIX MOVIE fans already know, we are the INSECT MIND, becoming digitalized. Within 50 years, we will be walking in simulated realities, Virtual Machines, Computerised Eye Glasses with 4 dimensional affects. In the fictional movies of the Matrix, the human race is overtaken by an Alien Race, because we became to digitalized to know anything of reality, beyond the Synthetic Screen. We blinded ourselves. My whole Insect Human Mind theory is that we are evolving into THEM, The Grey Species, of which there are many different kinds of species. All in theory of course.
 

JimELUCIER

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#38
I would disagree with this Jim. It's surprising how many animals have colour vision, even non-mammals, that is in some cases better than humans. A lot of birds for instance rely heavily on colour for display and certain reptiles like geckos and chameleons as well. Insects may be poorer than us at seeing red, but they can see ultra-violet light, which we can't.
In time, maybe 20, maybe 50 years from now, we will be able to see better than any animal or insect on the earth. We will be using technologies that were founded on the Insect Hive Mind, many decades ago. If you look at the machines of where our computers came from, you can see the mechanics of cocoons, spider webs, and Hives, or Nests.
 

JimELUCIER

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#39
The industrial revolution began with the textile revolution brought about by the Silk Road. Now we, like the Silk Worms, make endless factories of, making endless fabrics, sowing and weaving, just like the Silk Worm, or the Caterpillar. Now we make chrysalis's, and cocoons called mobile devices, and micro computers. All of which were based on wires, threads, endless wires, endless threads.
 

rynner2

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#41
The industrial revolution began with the textile revolution brought about by the Silk Road.
Not so.

The Silk Road out of China started during the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

"The main traders during antiquity were the Chinese, Persians, Greeks, Syrians, Romans, Armenians, Indians, and Bactrians, and from the 5th to the 8th century the Sogdians. During the coming of age of Islam, Arab traders became prominent."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk_Road

The industrial revolution came much later:
"The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840. This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, improved efficiency of water power, the increasing use of steam power, and the development of machine tools. It also included the change from wood and other bio-fuels to coal."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution

Textile manufacture was a major part of the Industrial Revolution, but this started off with cotton from India, and then from America.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution#Textile_manufacture

So the sweeping generalisation you make linking the Silk Road with the Industrial Revolution just weakens whatever argument you were trying to make. As British sea-power grew, most of our goods came in by sea, and the old Silk Road had little relevance to the Industrial Revolution.
 

JimELUCIER

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#44
Not so.

The Silk Road out of China started during the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

"The main traders during antiquity were the Chinese, Persians, Greeks, Syrians, Romans, Armenians, Indians, and Bactrians, and from the 5th to the 8th century the Sogdians. During the coming of age of Islam, Arab traders became prominent."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk_Road

The industrial revolution came much later:
"The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840. This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, improved efficiency of water power, the increasing use of steam power, and the development of machine tools. It also included the change from wood and other bio-fuels to coal."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution

Textile manufacture was a major part of the Industrial Revolution, but this started off with cotton from India, and then from America.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution#Textile_manufacture

So the sweeping generalisation you make linking the Silk Road with the Industrial Revolution just weakens whatever argument you were trying to make. As British sea-power grew, most of our goods came in by sea, and the old Silk Road had little relevance to the Industrial Revolution.
I understand what you saying, some good points, and I agree. What I am trying to say is that the Silk Road, the trade of silks, and new staples to Europe opened the floodgates for trade into Western Europe. Strange how England became such a power house of Weaving, sowing, threading, just as the Spider Mind of our collective being would suggest. The Crop Circles do not show images of animals, but rather, mostly insects, and complex weaving patterns. You speak a lot about supply, and demand. But what I am asking you is, what was the real driving force behind the demand. On the surface the answer is simple, MONEY, JOBS. But those are surface answers to questions that demand far more deeper answers. The Silk Road mentality, and the Industrial Revolution are the exact something. The methods of transfer changed over the centuries, but the CAUSE behind the DEMAND FOR textiles, weaving, sewing machines is the INSECT MIND. Water and Steam Power which ushered in the new machines of factories are were all inventions and creations of world's first food supply, DIATOMS. That is the next thread in my argument, I will post it soon. All insects evolved from simple bacterial organisms. Through evolution, the cog wheel, and computer part mechanics of Diatoms were transferred genetically through hundreds of generations.
 

JimELUCIER

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#45
You're just making this up as you go along, aren't you?
No. These topics are listed on my website school. I teach them. Obviously I can not share the whole gamete in a posting because it would take several pages. It is easier to discuss these things in piece meal. My two world wide published Oracles are based on these Teachings, which I again must state are found on my website School. If you would like to learn all the teachings and secrets please go to my website and register. I would be very happy to send you the hundreds of illustration's I have made concerning all these topics, upon receiving payment of Tutorship of course.
 

rynner2

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#46
The methods of transfer changed over the centuries, but the CAUSE behind the DEMAND FOR textiles, weaving, sewing machines is the INSECT MIND. Water and Steam Power which ushered in the new machines of factories are were all inventions and creations of world's first food supply, DIATOMS. That is the next thread in my argument, I will post it soon.
Er, you lost me there! I await your next post with 'bated breath.
 

Swifty

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#49
That's MR ignoramus to you! ;) X ... (what? .... men can occasionally send a kiss to another man .... bloody homophobes ......) ..... but, seriously, brush your teeth rynner ...
 

JimELUCIER

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#50
Er, you lost me there! I await your next post with 'bated breath.
Bees, like many other insect species build, and maintain their own Silk Roads, often travelling several miles to produce a new colony. If they have too, they can build bridges to cross waters. Bees, like wasps, spiders, termites, and thousands of other insect species create hives, or nests, just like we build houses. The WILL for us to build factories, textiles, and so for comes the Alien Design of our Subconscious mind. A template of behavior. If you look inside any insect nest, or hive you will see many levels with doorways, and hallways. You will a factory of a hundreds to tens of thousand of workers working for the prime employer, the Queen.
 

JimELUCIER

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#51
So that's what the smell was? ....:D

The spice trade is the oldest recognised trade unless I'm mistaken Jim? ... it's spice Jim, but not as we know it ..
Agreed, spice, nuts, fruits, silks, textiles, you name it, we trade it. We do so by building networks. Networks is the keyword here. Rome needed to build endless road networks just to keep its empire alive. Bees, like all insects trade their goods with flowers. The kingdoms and flowers and insects is based solely on TRADE.
 

JimELUCIER

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#52
Not so.

The Silk Road out of China started during the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD).

"The main traders during antiquity were the Chinese, Persians, Greeks, Syrians, Romans, Armenians, Indians, and Bactrians, and from the 5th to the 8th century the Sogdians. During the coming of age of Islam, Arab traders became prominent."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silk_Road

The industrial revolution came much later:
"The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes in the period from about 1760 to sometime between 1820 and 1840. This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, improved efficiency of water power, the increasing use of steam power, and the development of machine tools. It also included the change from wood and other bio-fuels to coal."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution

Textile manufacture was a major part of the Industrial Revolution, but this started off with cotton from India, and then from America.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_Revolution#Textile_manufacture

So the sweeping generalisation you make linking the Silk Road with the Industrial Revolution just weakens whatever argument you were trying to make. As British sea-power grew, most of our goods came in by sea, and the old Silk Road had little relevance to the Industrial Revolution.
By the way, African Fire Ants build massive rafts, or ships during floods. And Termite mounds in Africa look like the towers we build in our cities, they even glow at night, with the mounds looking like our city towers at night. Africa, oh ya, isn't that the place where all human beings were said to have their origin? Adding that many African Tribes still believe, as their ancestors did, that we were created by Insect looking Beings from space.
 

Graylien

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#53
Bees, like many other insect species build, and maintain their own Silk Roads, often travelling several miles to produce a new colony. If they have too, they can build bridges to cross waters.
Whoa there. Bees build bridges?

Bees, like wasps, spiders, termites, and thousands of other insect species create hives, or nests, just like we build houses. The WILL for us to build factories, textiles, and so for comes the Alien Design of our Subconscious mind.
But don't pretty much all mammals (and birds) build themselves some kind of nest? This surely isn't just characteristic of insect behaviour?
 

JimELUCIER

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#54
Whoa there. Bees build bridges?


But don't pretty much all mammals (and birds) build themselves some kind of nest? This surely isn't just characteristic of insect behaviour?
Insect nests and hives are like factories, making thousands of their kind, were as animals produce only a very small hand full of eggs.
 
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#59
Insect nests and hives are like factories, making thousands of their kind, were as animals produce only a very small hand full of eggs.
Yet despite existing side by side for billions of years on the planet and producing billions of other insects while animals produced less, insects are not the dominant species.There may be more of them but they have little influence to animal and plant life compared to man.

I'll bet we ape mammal humans have done more to affect the flora and fauna of the planet which derives from our animal instincts: territory, social interaction, community, acceptance.

Your theory claims we've been developing our insect mind over thousands of year. I disagree, I think that avarice, one of the most basic animal instincts, has created the insect world you see and only recently.

We spent quite a lot of time eating insects of each other in a dark cave.

Also birds, rodents and reptiles are quite prolific breeders and there's an insect food source to feed them.
 

Xanatic*

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#60
Much of what you mention, trading networks, housing, clothing, seems to have obvious inherent benefits. I don't see why we need an implanted insect instinct to explain this.
 
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