The Mandela Effect: False Memory

MorningAngel

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We should also remember that the standard TV and theatrical cuts of films may differ. I once read a customer review of the DVD of Repo Man which complained that an important scene was omitted. What the reviewer failed to realize is that the scene was never in the theatrical version, but only the TV cut (as evidenced by the Criterion Collection edition, which includes both versions).
The Muppets Christmas Carol had a beautiful song called ‘The Love is Gone’ sung by Belle. It was there on the VHS but has gone from the DVD and when it’s on on TV. I miss it every time.
 

maximus otter

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The Muppets Christmas Carol had a beautiful song called ‘The Love is Gone’ sung by Belle. It was there on the VHS but has gone from the DVD and when it’s on on TV. I miss it every time.
MGM executives were shown a two-hour rough cut of The Wizard of Oz. They felt that it should be shortened to about 90 minutes. One of the cuts they recommended was to lose one of the songs. Which one? Over the Rainbow...

maximus otter
 

Swifty

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MGM executives were shown a two-hour rough cut of The Wizard of Oz. They felt that it should be shortened to about 90 minutes. One of the cuts they recommended was to lose one of the songs. Which one? Over the Rainbow...

maximus otter
There never has been a song called Over the Rainbow in The Wizard Of Oz?
 

maximus otter

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Swifty

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maximus otter

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sorry Max .. it was an attempt at a Mandala-esque type joke :)
Soz: l thought you were having one of those “Elementary, my dear Watson”/“Play it again, Sam” moments, and had convinced yourself that the title was Somewhere Over the Rainbow.

maximus otter
 

Swifty

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Finally, someone who knows that - despite the misspelling in the name of this thread - it was Nelson Mandala who died in prison and was never President of South Africa. Unless you meant THIS Nelson mandala.
.. with a South African accent, he would have been Mendela I suppose?

It's been decades since this song and I'm still waiting for my free Nelson Mandela

 

escargot

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The famous Effect just happened to me.

On another thread I was about to post about an incident in a book which gave a character his nickname. I looked it up to be sure, and I was right except for the exact location.

Puzzling until I realised that something similar happened to me around the time I read it and I'd mixed up the real and fictional incidents.
 

Tribble

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Quick—what’s the correct spelling, “Georgia O’Keefe” or “Georgia O’Keeffe”? And before you say anything, know this: How you answer may literally depend on which reality you live in.
For the record, the art-historically correct answer is the one with two “F”s. Nevertheless, some people still really, really believe that the famed American painter, pioneer of abstraction, and icon of the Southwest is “Georgia O’Keefe.” And not only that: They believe that the co-existence of the two names is evidence of parallel dimensions, or a sinister conspiracy of mass mind-control. Or something.


https://news.artnet.com/art-world/georgia-okeeffe-mandela-effect-1570156
 

Analogue Boy

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Quick—what’s the correct spelling, “Georgia O’Keefe” or “Georgia O’Keeffe”? And before you say anything, know this: How you answer may literally depend on which reality you live in.
For the record, the art-historically correct answer is the one with two “F”s. Nevertheless, some people still really, really believe that the famed American painter, pioneer of abstraction, and icon of the Southwest is “Georgia O’Keefe.” And not only that: They believe that the co-existence of the two names is evidence of parallel dimensions, or a sinister conspiracy of mass mind-control. Or something.


https://news.artnet.com/art-world/georgia-okeeffe-mandela-effect-1570156
I don’t care either way. Maybe how this is how stuff slips past us.
 

EnolaGaia

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Soz: l thought you were having one of those “Elementary, my dear Watson”/“Play it again, Sam” moments, and had convinced yourself that the title was Somewhere Over the Rainbow. ...
In this case, there are good reasons why people might believe the title includes "Somewhere." Multiple more recent and successful cover versions of the song were released under the title "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" - e.g., the 1993 Israel Kamakawiwoʻole vocal / ukelele medley and the 2017 Ariana Grande single (originally her live performance at the One Love Manchester concert). In the UK, the single's release used this version of the title.
 

Simon

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CALLING ALL AMERICANS!

Another video from All Time Scary. A lot of his content is quite lame - quibbles over spellings and names and the like - and I also find it Amerocentric to the point where, as a Brit, I often have no opinion on what he's talking about. However, I do like the guy's unassuming presentation style for some reason, so find myself dipping in from time to time

This one about New York does seem a bit spooky - particularly on the exact location of the Statue of L:iberty and the Black Tom explosion of 1916 (which was a German terrorist attack on New York that many people claim not to have been aware of).

And this is where we need some American input. Are these things really as puzzling as this guy is making out - or is he just ill-educated?

The background of the clip has reminded me of this:
Which has just led to my own personal Mandela Effect. I could've sworn the music on the LWT ident was this one:
Bizarre!
 

Ermintruder

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I could've sworn the music on the LWT ident was this one:
Umm....no. They are exactly correct, as ascribed. And this, despite LWT effectively just being Thames TV's weekend guise (same station, with some slight additional production team input).

I'm now having a think about the American Mandela Effect video.....interesting.
 

Ermintruder

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Zeke Newbold said:
And this is where we need some American input
Indeed we do.

Meantime: Grand Central....Station. Never heard it referred to as anything else.

Ellis Island- yes, I did think that this was where the Statue of Liberty was located. And no.....I'd never heard of Liberty Island.

Black Tom Explosion: I only recently heard about this, via TheHistoryGuy on Youtube, and posted about it, here, within 'Forgotten History'. I expressed my surprise regarding the existence of this incident, citing the Lusitania and the Zimmerman Telegram as being the ONLY commonly-understood (and taught, in UK schools) factors to have brought the US into WW1. Long story short (unless it IS a genuine Mandela Effect)...it is not cited as a terrorist incident, because it's unclear as to whether it was genuinely intentional.

Statue of Liberty torch, getting inside it....I thought it was always a tour option. But I'm unsure as to *why* I think that.....
 

ChasFink

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And this is where we need some American input.]
A reminder that I did give some American input in post #609 of this thread.

Two more reasons why people think - and say - "Grand Central Station":
  1. The subway station under Grand Central Terminal is known as the Grand Central - 42nd St station.
  2. A popular radio show from 1937 to 1954 was called Grand Central Station - and it is still called that in this reality.
 

Ermintruder

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A reminder that I did give some American input in post #609 of this thread.
I missed that, thank you for the link. And Wiki agrees, exactly as you said:

Wiki said:
Grand Central Terminal was named by and for the New York Central Railroad, which built the station and its two precursors on the site. It has "always been more colloquially and affectionately known as Grand Central Station", the name of its immediate precursor that operated from 1900 until 1910 and which also shares its name with the nearby U.S. Post Office station at 450 Lexington Avenue and, colloquially, with the Grand Central–42nd Street station next to the terminal
In a minor semi-Mandela Memory Moment (and by way of a Fortean coincidence) I was recently completely-thrown by a tourist visitor to Glasgow advising me they'd arrived by train at "Grand Central Station". I corrected them, by demoting that place to what I've always known it as, namely, "Glasgow Central Station" (proper Glaswegians need to pitch-in at this point, including @Frideswide)

But: it's not that simple. Because immediately above Glasgow Central railway station is the Grand Hotel...and, 'under' Glasgow Central, is....The Grand Central Rail Company

So come on, now: is Glasgow Central Station actually known as (Glasgow) Grand Central Station?
 

Frideswide

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So come on, now: is Glasgow Central Station actually known as (Glasgow) Grand Central Station?
Never heard it called that. It's always just Central.

Although now I know that (Glasgow) Grand Central Station is an option I shall sit down there and weep!
 

GNC

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The makers of current movie Joker are currently waging a damage limitation war against those who believe their film will incite violence, just like back when The Dark Knight was released and some guy dressed up as The Joker and murdered a bunch of people in a cinema. Remember that? Except you don't, because the film was The Dark Knight Rises, which doesn't feature the Joker character, and the murderer was not dressed up as him either, he was in pseudo-military gear. What is true is that he murdered people.
 

Ringo

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The makers of current movie Joker are currently waging a damage limitation war against those who believe their film will incite violence, just like back when The Dark Knight was released and some guy dressed up as The Joker and murdered a bunch of people in a cinema. Remember that? Except you don't, because the film was The Dark Knight Rises, which doesn't feature the Joker character, and the murderer was not dressed up as him either, he was in pseudo-military gear. What is true is that he murdered people.
I remembered that it was The Dark Kinight Rises and that he was dressed in dark military style clothing. People thought it was something to do with the film at first.
 

Zeke Newbold

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Okay I'm not - necessarily - making a Mandela out of this, but....Lyme disease. Whaaa!?

Apparently it's quite a big problem in the UK right now:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-48606826

Since when has Lyme disease existed in the UK and how come that it is only now starting to filter into my consciousness?

So, apparently, if you get bitten by certaini ticks - mostly found in wooded areas - you can contracxt Lyme disease - and the symptoms can be very debilitating.

Now when I was a lad my grandparents lived near a forested area and my sister, brother and me would spend hour upon hour explroring that environment - even on some occcasions camping out in it*. We were warned about swamps, about wild horses,about treesapassing, about dodgy strangers, - but never was there any concern about, or mention of, Lyme disease and nor had I heard about any one else getting it.

Nowadays forested parks in Europe (and even Russia) feature scary signposts showing dangerous ticks - warning you not to sit down too long in certain areas - and generally to keep an eye out for them - for fear of getting Lyme disease. But this is all new to me!

In fact I can't think of a time when this ailment has featured in English Literature (which I have studied to higher degree level). You might have thought that a realistic, somewhat gloomy, rural writer like Thomas Hardy would have mentioned Lynme disease somehwere if it had been a reaL problem then (perhaps by another name) - but I can't recall anything like that.

As far as I knew dangerous insect bites were the province of hotter, southerly climes. Of course, one would get bitten by something out in the sticks...but it was an annoyance and never an issue in the UK, or northern Europe.

Which brings me onto my next question: is this spread of Lyme disease related to climate change at all? And if so, why aren't I hearing people say this?

No doubt I'll now be deluged by indignant answers from `Lyme disease survivors` who will tell me to cover myself in cellophane whenver I go to the woods or, I'll be the next victim....

* Then we got the tram home for thruppence and had kippers for supper.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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Okay I'm not - necessarily - making a Mandela out of this, but....Lyme disease. Whaaa!?

Apparently it's quite a big problem in the UK right now:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-48606826

Since when has Lyme disease existed in the UK and how come that it is only now starting to filter into my consciousness?

So, apparently, if you get bitten by certaini ticks - mostly found in wooded areas - you can contracxt Lyme disease - and the symptoms can be very debilitating.

Now when I was a lad my grandparents lived near a forested area and my sister, brother and me would spend hour upon hour explroring that environment - even on some occcasions camping out in it*. We were warned about swamps, about wild horses,about treesapassing, about dodgy strangers, - but never was there any concern about, or mention of, Lyme disease and nor had I heard about any one else getting it.

Nowadays forested parks in Europe (and even Russia) feature scary signposts showing dangerous ticks - warning you not to sit down too long in certain areas - and generally to keep an eye out for them - for fear of getting Lyme disease. But this is all new to me!

In fact I can't think of a time when this ailment has featured in English Literature (which I have studied to higher degree level). You might have thought that a realistic, somewhat gloomy, rural writer like Thomas Hardy would have mentioned Lynme disease somehwere if it had been a reaL problem then (perhaps by another name) - but I can't recall anything like that.

As far as I knew dangerous insect bites were the province of hotter, southerly climes. Of course, one would get bitten by something out in the sticks...but it was an annoyance and never an issue in the UK, or northern Europe.

Which brings me onto my next question: is this spread of Lyme disease related to climate change at all? And if so, why aren't I hearing people say this?

No doubt I'll now be deluged by indignant answers from `Lyme disease survivors` who will tell me to cover myself in cellophane whenver I go to the woods or, I'll be the next victim....

* Then we got the tram home for thruppence and had kippers for supper.
A bunch of us went to a heavily-wooded private island in Poole harbour for a stag weekend about fifteen years ago (Green Island IIRC) and there were warnings there about ticks and Lyme disease.
 

gordonrutter

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A bunch of us went to a heavily-wooded private island in Poole harbour for a stag weekend about fifteen years ago (Green Island IIRC) and there were warnings there about ticks and Lyme disease.
Yeah I used to work for an environmental education charity in the early ‘90’s and we warned people about it then.
 

Vardoger

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Okay I'm not - necessarily - making a Mandela out of this, but....Lyme disease. Whaaa!?

Apparently it's quite a big problem in the UK right now:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-48606826

Since when has Lyme disease existed in the UK and how come that it is only now starting to filter into my consciousness?

So, apparently, if you get bitten by certaini ticks - mostly found in wooded areas - you can contracxt Lyme disease - and the symptoms can be very debilitating.

Now when I was a lad my grandparents lived near a forested area and my sister, brother and me would spend hour upon hour explroring that environment - even on some occcasions camping out in it*. We were warned about swamps, about wild horses,about treesapassing, about dodgy strangers, - but never was there any concern about, or mention of, Lyme disease and nor had I heard about any one else getting it.

Nowadays forested parks in Europe (and even Russia) feature scary signposts showing dangerous ticks - warning you not to sit down too long in certain areas - and generally to keep an eye out for them - for fear of getting Lyme disease. But this is all new to me!

In fact I can't think of a time when this ailment has featured in English Literature (which I have studied to higher degree level). You might have thought that a realistic, somewhat gloomy, rural writer like Thomas Hardy would have mentioned Lynme disease somehwere if it had been a reaL problem then (perhaps by another name) - but I can't recall anything like that.

As far as I knew dangerous insect bites were the province of hotter, southerly climes. Of course, one would get bitten by something out in the sticks...but it was an annoyance and never an issue in the UK, or northern Europe.

Which brings me onto my next question: is this spread of Lyme disease related to climate change at all? And if so, why aren't I hearing people say this?

No doubt I'll now be deluged by indignant answers from `Lyme disease survivors` who will tell me to cover myself in cellophane whenver I go to the woods or, I'll be the next victim....

* Then we got the tram home for thruppence and had kippers for supper.
It has always been a problem in Southern Norway and it has increased in the last years.
 
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