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The Mandela Effect: False Memory

catseye

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As a child when I read these books the spelling 'Mallory' seemed more apt because the shape of the word suggested to me the structure of the school building itself.
I imagined it like a small castle with the M representing the facade and the repeated 'l' the two towers that could be seen from the front.
Being from a young age fascinated by the Tower of London, I probably slipped that into the mix somewhere.

Not as farfetched as it sounds: a suggested logo for Wembley Stadium years ago constituted a capital W that incorporated images of the building's two towers.
I've always thought that the spelling ought to be 'Mallory' because 'Malory' implies something bad, because of the 'mal' bit, which is obfuscated by the second L.
 

escargot

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I've always thought that the spelling ought to be 'Mallory' because 'Malory' implies something bad, because of the 'mal' bit, which is obfuscated by the second L.
How our little minds worked! :)
 

Tunn11

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I would have said they were Mallory as well - never read 'em but working in a library, you'd have thought I'd have got it right!

Next you'll be telling me it's Bigles and Wiliam Brown!

I read somewhere about some experiment where they'd given people a pack of cards with the colours of the suits reversed, i.e black hearts and diamonds and red spades and clubs and that it disturbed people to the extent that they felt ill, as they knew something was wrong but couldn't quickly see what.
 

escargot

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I would have said they were Mallory as well - never read 'em but working in a library, you'd have thought I'd have got it right!

Next you'll be telling me it's Bigles and Wiliam Brown!

I read somewhere about some experiment where they'd given people a pack of cards with the colours of the suits reversed, i.e black hearts and diamonds and red spades and clubs and that it disturbed people to the extent that they felt ill, as they knew something was wrong but couldn't quickly see what.
Psychologists can play all sorts of tricks with the cards because people think they know them so well. There's a brilliant one on YouTube where cards appear and disappear and it's set up so you can guess which ones have gone or where the Devil is or summat. :omg:
 

EnolaGaia

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... I read somewhere about some experiment where they'd given people a pack of cards with the colours of the suits reversed, i.e black hearts and diamonds and red spades and clubs and that it disturbed people to the extent that they felt ill, as they knew something was wrong but couldn't quickly see what.

That would be the classic Bruner / Postman experiment concerning incongruity clashing with expectations in perceptual tasks.

On the Perception of Incongruity: A Paradigm
Jerome S. Bruner and Leo Postman (1949)
Journal of Personality, 18, 206-223.

https://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Bruner/Cards/
https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.550.3911&rep=rep1&type=pdf

See Also:

https://bornintocolour.wordpress.com/basics-of-culture/perception/playing-cards/

... which mentions Thomas Kuhn claiming Postman found the incongruous cards "acutely uncomfortable".
 

uair01

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So today I was in this boardgames shop (I'm not a gamer) and I bought this dodecahedron dice, because I was totally sure that it was featured on "Melancholia" by Albrecht Dürer. So I was totally surprised when I looked up the woodcut, and discovered that there was no dodecahedron at all. Also in my memory the geometric object was in the foreground and in the woodcut it;s in the background.

20220318_201941.jpg
1647631799288.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melencolia_I
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truncated_triangular_trapezohedron#Dürer's_solid
 

escargot

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So today I was in this boardgames shop (I'm not a gamer) and I bought this dodecahedron dice, because I was totally sure that it was featured on "Melancholia" by Albrecht Dürer. So I was totally surprised when I looked up the woodcut, and discovered that there was no dodecahedron at all. Also in my memory the geometric object was in the foreground and in the woodcut it;s in the background.

View attachment 53217 View attachment 53218
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melencolia_I
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truncated_triangular_trapezohedron#Dürer's_solid

I too love Dürer. :)

Leonardo da Vinci's geometric sketches include the Dodecahedron. Perhaps you're seen that and mixed them up? Just a thought.
 

escargot

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Not sure if this is a Mandela job or not.

For some reason, although I was good at geography as a child and loved looking at maps and atlases, I mixed up Cape Horn and the Horn of Africa.

I was astounded to discover via a TV documentary recently that the Horn of Africa is the big pointy bit on the right, not the general area at the bottom that leads to the pointy bit. That's Cape Horn, which is not actually, as I long believed, where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet.

They'll be telling me next that Cape Town is not stuck on the southernmost tip of Cape Horn. I'm going back to bed.
 

Analogue Boy

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Re the thread title. ‘False Memory’ is an explanation and a possibility but the thrust of The Mandela Effect is that things have somehow changed and some common knowledge we believed to be true is no longer the case.
 

EnolaGaia

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Not sure if this is a Mandela job or not. ...
I was astounded to discover via a TV documentary recently that the Horn of Africa is the big pointy bit on the right, not the general area at the bottom that leads to the pointy bit. That's Cape Horn, which is not actually, as I long believed, where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet.
They'll be telling me next that Cape Town is not stuck on the southernmost tip of Cape Horn. I'm going back to bed.

You've experienced at least a double Mandela effect ... Maybe even a Mandela trifecta ...

Cape Horn is at the southern tip of South America (Tierra del Fuego). It's that continent's southernmost headland.

The cape in southern Africa - south of Cape Town, and mistakenly cited as the place where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet - is the Cape of Good Hope. The Cape of Good Hope isn't the southernmost tip of Africa. That's Cape Agulhas, circa 150 km farther southeast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_of_Good_Hope
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Horn
 

escargot

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You've experienced at least a double Mandela effect ... Maybe even a Mandela trifecta ...

Cape Horn is at the southern tip of South America (Tierra del Fuego). It's that continent's southernmost headland.

The cape in southern Africa - south of Cape Town, and mistakenly cited as the place where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet - is the Cape of Good Hope. The Cape of Good Hope isn't the southernmost tip of Africa. That's Cape Agulhas, circa 150 km farther southeast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_of_Good_Hope
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Horn
Haha, I give up. :rollingw:

The Horn of Africa bit though, there's summat I've learned. :)
 

catseye

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You've experienced at least a double Mandela effect ... Maybe even a Mandela trifecta ...

Cape Horn is at the southern tip of South America (Tierra del Fuego). It's that continent's southernmost headland.

The cape in southern Africa - south of Cape Town, and mistakenly cited as the place where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet - is the Cape of Good Hope. The Cape of Good Hope isn't the southernmost tip of Africa. That's Cape Agulhas, circa 150 km farther southeast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_of_Good_Hope
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_Horn
More capes than Batman's wardrobe.
 

Mythopoeika

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OK... here's an odd one.

Recent news has mentioned that plants have been grown for the first time in regolith from the Moon.
I'm pretty sure I remember NASA doing this back in the 1970s and finding that the plants grew really well. Anybody else remember this?

Anton Petrov discusses the plant growth here:
 

eburacum

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OK... here's an odd one.
Recent news has mentioned that plants have been grown for the first time in regolith from the Moon.
I'm pretty sure I remember NASA doing this back in the 1970s and finding that the plants grew really well. Anybody else remember this?
I'm reasonably sure that the earlier experiments were carried out in replicated regolith, that is to say, soil containing the same minerals and elements in the same proportions. Real lunar soil is prohibitively expensive for obvious reasons.

But actual regolith would probably have some minor differences from simulated regolith, since it was formed in a vacuum and been exposed to extreme conditions for billions of years, so simulated regolith would not be sufficiently accurate to demonstrate that it could support plant growth.
 

Mythopoeika

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I'm reasonably sure that the earlier experiments were carried out in replicated regolith, that is to say, soil containing the same minerals and elements in the same proportions. Real lunar soil is prohibitively expensive for obvious reasons.

But actual regolith would probably have some minor differences from simulated regolith, since it was formed in a vacuum and been exposed to extreme conditions for billions of years, so simulated regolith would not be sufficiently accurate to demonstrate that it could support plant growth.
Odd that they would use simulated regolith at that time, when so much of the real stuff had been brought back. Hang the expense!
 

eburacum

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There really isn't that much lunar soil on Earth, 382 kilograms in total from Apollo. Most of the material was needed for geological assaying, to find out how the Moon was formed and whether there are commercially-valuable minerals on the surface. Once this had been done, the regolith could be simulated relatively cheaply.
 

Floyd1

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I was certain that British one penny coins said ONE PENCE on them, not ONE PENNY.

I thought it was NEW PENCE from 1971-1982 and then ONE PENCE from 1982 onwards.
 

eziofan

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I was certain that British one penny coins said ONE PENCE on them, not ONE PENNY.

I thought it was NEW PENCE from 1971-1982 and then ONE PENCE from 1982 onwards.
No it was always one penny as pence is the plural so only anything over one penny will be pence
 

Floyd1

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Trying to find a short story by (I thought) Stephen King that involves a guy selling his house to a man who he recognises to be a Viet Cong officer who tortured him when he was a prisoner of war. When the officer leaves the house after viewing it, the owner then sees a small door that he hasn't noticed before. It turns out that it leads down to a cellar that is hell and he sends the officer down there on his next visit to view the property.

I'd have sworn it was in King's short story collection 'Night Shift' but apparently not. Did I make this story up?
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Trying to find a short story by (I thought) Stephen King that involves a guy selling his house to a man who he recognises to be a Viet Cong officer who tortured him when he was a prisoner of war. When the officer leaves the house after viewing it, the owner then sees a small door that he hasn't noticed before. It turns out that it leads down to a cellar that is hell and he sends the officer down there on his next visit to view the property.

I'd have sworn it was in King's short story collection 'Night Shift' but apparently not. Did I make this story up?

If Stephen King didn't write it, given his reputation for blatant plagiarism, he probably will now.
 
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