The March Of Technology

Mythopoeika

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Mythopoeika,

Agree, that is one way.

But I used to like getting straight to the works via the printer port. Or the serial.

Also you didn't need lots of support programs.

DOS 6.22, GWBASIC along with a printer port break out and your computer was an electronics lab.

Ah, the good old days.

INT21
Yeah, it was great back then.
 

INT21

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I have had a copy of Electronics Today International sat on my desk for months. But (naturally) I can't find it when I need it.

On the front cover it said 'USB. the end of the serial port ?'.

It must have been printed in the very early 80s or late 70s.

And it came to pass.

Little did the people suspect that soon the 'skreeeeee' of the 56K modem would also become a fond memory.

INT21
 

Mythopoeika

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I have had a copy of Electronics Today International sat on my desk for months. But (naturally) I can't find it when I need it.

On the front cover it said 'USB. the end of the serial port ?'.

It must have been printed in the very early 80s or late 70s.

And it came to pass.

Little did the people suspect that soon the 'skreeeeee' of the 56K modem would also become a fond memory.

INT21
USB was designed in 1996.
A time traveller must have written that ETI article. John Titor?
 

INT21

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Mythopoeika,

You are right. How could I have made such an error ? Getting old probably.:(

I have the magazine in front of me.

ETI: ELECTRONICS TODAY INTERNATIONAL.

Vol 26 Issue 7 20 June 1997 £2.50

'The Universal serial bus. A rival for RS232 ?'.

A report by Robin Abbot

I collected most of the ETI issues over the years it was published. Use to really look forward to the next one.

INT21
 

rynner2

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Driverless cars - no halfway house?
Rory Cellan-Jones Technology correspondent

The progress in driverless car technology over recent years has been astounding. A future when you can hop in and have a sleep while an autonomous vehicle takes you to your destination appears to be closer than anyone thought just five years ago.

Getting there, however, will involve quite a few stages, with cars getting more and more autonomous but human drivers still having some role. Or will it?

A report by Bloomberg says Ford is going to skip a step and go straight to fully autonomous driving. The article says that is because engineers who are testing the company's self-driving vehicles are falling asleep at the wheel because there is so little for them to do.

Ford tells me that only part of this story is true: "Reports that Ford engineers were falling asleep while testing autonomous vehicles are inaccurate."
But it goes on to say that "high levels of automation without full autonomy capability could provide a false sense of security".

That means it is difficult for the driver to suddenly take control if there is a situation where the technology is not up to it. And that's why it is going to head straight to what is known as SAE level four - "autonomous capability that will take the driver completely out of the driving process in defined areas".

SAE is a global organisation of automotive engineers that has come up with a definition of six levels of automation, from zero - where the driver is in full control - to five, where the car does everything in all circumstances.

In January, at CES in Las Vegas, Ford's Ken Washington told me confidently that the company would have a fully autonomous car on the road by 2021: "The vehicles we are going to put in our 2021 fully autonomous ride service will not have a steering wheel, they won't have a brake pedal," he explained.

"So this means there's no issue with drivers having to take over control because the vehicle will know how to handle all scenarios."

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39050538
 

INT21

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Driver less cars are both unnecessary and potentially very dangerous. The whole idea should be dropped.

I doubt that they could ever be programmed for every eventuality.

A good example is where a car in front of you indicates to turn right. Moves over toward the centre of the road to initiate the turn, then turns left across the front of you. This happens surprisingly often.

How would the self drive car see the situation ?

Would it, as most drivers do, say to itself 'there is a good chance this idiot will change his/her mind and cut me up' or will it assume the driver will do as he/she indicated ?

Be prepared for your insurance policy to go through the roof.

INT21
 
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Driver less cars are both unnecessary and potentially very dangerous. The whole idea should be dropped.

I doubt that they could ever be programmed for every eventuality.
The real question is "Are they safer than people driving"?

I suspect they very nearly are and if they're not now it won't be long.
 

Vardoger

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Driver less cars are both unnecessary and potentially very dangerous. The whole idea should be dropped.

I doubt that they could ever be programmed for every eventuality.

A good example is where a car in front of you indicates to turn right. Moves over toward the centre of the road to initiate the turn, then turns left across the front of you. This happens surprisingly often.

How would the self drive car see the situation ?

Would it, as most drivers do, say to itself 'there is a good chance this idiot will change his/her mind and cut me up' or will it assume the driver will do as he/she indicated ?

Be prepared for your insurance policy to go through the roof.

INT21
Self driving cars will be equipped with deep learning neural networks which learns how the traffic behaves and take decisions on its own. It will not only be computer programs running If-Then loops.
 
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Self driving cars will be equipped with deep learning neural networks which learns how the traffic behaves and take decisions on its own. It will not only be computer programs running If-Then loops.
...such machines will always keep a safe distance from the car in front, never drive excessively fast and stop as safely and as quickly as is possible. None of those things are done by people for the most part.
 

Heckler

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If it won't decide that it's need to go as fast as possible everywhere, all the time, is better than observing basic road safety and common sense then it will far safer than the majority of drivers currently on the roads.
 

Mythopoeika

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Eventually, when all cars are driverless, the level of safety will be much higher than it is now.
However, there will always be petrolheads who insist on driving themselves...and invariably they will drive in a risky manner. Unless laws are passed to ban such risky behaviour completely.
 
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Unless laws are passed to ban such risky behaviour completely.
Hmm, don't know if that would work. Look at current laws concerning mobile phone use whilst driving.

I've thought about the driverless car thing for a while now and I honestly can't see how it would work...unless all cars were made driverless at the same time.

Eventually, when all cars are driverless, the level of safety will be much higher than it is now.
I agree, it would. I just think that the transition period would be a nightmare.
 
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Hmm, don't know if that would work. Look at current laws concerning mobile phone use whilst driving.

I've thought about the driverless car thing for a while now and I honestly can't see how it would work...unless all cars were made driverless at the same time.

I agree, it would. I just think that the transition period would be a nightmare.
I'd speculate an interim period with speed limiters and sensors to ensure space between vehicles would come first, possibly with the faculty to remotely shut down vehicle engines.
 

PeteByrdie

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The way things seem to be going the transition between driver and driverless is being filled with driver-assist. As things stand, a Tesla will probably get you safely to your destination, but you are still expected to be in control of your vehicle, even if that control consists of holding the wheel and paying attention to what the car is doing and what's on the road. I don't think there's any doubt that driverless cars will be the norm in, say, twenty years time, but there are issues, both practical and legal, to be hammered out in the meantime. That process has begun, but I think it will be a long time before you are not still expected to be in control of your vehicle, perhaps except in locations specifically designed as suitable for driverless travel.
 

Heckler

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perhaps except in locations specifically designed as suitable for driverless travel.
And that's how you deal with the petrol head problem. Make three lanes of the motorway for driverless cars, the petrol heads get one, cross into the driverless lane and an ANPR camera by the side of road hits you up for three points and £200.
 
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And that's how you deal with the petrol head problem. Make three lanes of the motorway for driverless cars, the petrol heads get one, cross into the driverless lane and an ANPR camera by the side of road hits you up for three points and £200.
...and turns your engine off, and you have to pay to be towed out.
 

PeteByrdie

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And that's how you deal with the petrol head problem. Make three lanes of the motorway for driverless cars, the petrol heads get one, cross into the driverless lane and an ANPR camera by the side of road hits you up for three points and £200.
:rofl:
I hadn't been thinking of anything quite so draconian. I imagine road layouts and laws will respond to changes when convenient for the most part, and only slightly drive change (while claiming to be driving change to appease green concerns). So, change will be mostly driverless.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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I can't see driverless cars completely taking over for a long time yet. A lot of people (me included) enjoy driving, some even class it as a hobby (I'm not quite at that stage yet).
 

Frasier Buddolph

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If I were a long-haul trucker, I'd be preparing for my next career, because I think that's where we'll see widespread adoption of the technology first. I can foresee gangs of die-hard teamsters sabotaging the first autonomous rigs, but I think the economics of freight shipping make the changeover inevitable.
 

INT21

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Vehicle manufacturers can't even make the computerized engine control systems work with 100% reliability. And they are just dumb computers that take input from sensors and apply it to the engine.

No way are they ever going to have even 99% reliability with AI.

I won't be around when they try to roll it out; or I would be taking bets.

INT21
 

Naughty_Felid

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Driver less cars are both unnecessary and potentially very dangerous. The whole idea should be dropped.

I doubt that they could ever be programmed for every eventuality.

A good example is where a car in front of you indicates to turn right. Moves over toward the centre of the road to initiate the turn, then turns left across the front of you. This happens surprisingly often.

How would the self drive car see the situation ?

Would it, as most drivers do, say to itself 'there is a good chance this idiot will change his/her mind and cut me up' or will it assume the driver will do as he/she indicated ?

Be prepared for your insurance policy to go through the roof.

INT21
Yes because human drivers are so fucking reliable.
 

Heckler

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Yes because human drivers are so fucking reliable.
With human drivers the unreliability isn't the biggest danger, it's a human being's innate ability to willfully disregard common sense and established rules which enforce that common sense because of a hugely inflated sense of their own driving skill that most definitely is.
 

INT21

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NF,

I amazed at how this site allows such expletives to go unchallenged.

However.

In the case of a collision, who will be to blame ?

INT21
 

INT21

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Mythopoeika,

From your link...

....because semiautonomy is showing that computer drivers are likely safer than human ones...

There is a fatal flaw in this reasoning.

There are far, far fewer computerised cars than human driven ones. The accident rate sample is much to small to draw conclusions from. When the ratio reaches, say, 50/50 then it can be better assessed.

INT21
 

rynner2

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Environmentalists who are worried that Luddites have become extinct will be reassured by the responses on this thread! Luddites still want to stand in the way of technological progress...

The Luddites were a group of English textile workers and weavers in the 19th century who destroyed weaving machinery as a form of protest. The group was protesting the use of machinery in a "fraudulent and deceitful manner" to get around standard labour practices.[1] Luddites feared that the time spent learning the skills of their craft would go to waste as machines would replace their role in the industry.[2] It is a misconception that the Luddites protested against the machinery itself in an attempt to halt progress of technology. However, the term has come to mean one opposed to industrialisation, automation, computerisation or new technologies in general.[3] The Luddite movement began in Nottingham and culminated in a region-wide rebellion that lasted from 1811 to 1816. Mill owners took to shooting protesters and eventually the movement was brutally suppressed with military force.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luddite
 

Krepostnoi

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I can't see driverless cars completely taking over for a long time yet. A lot of people (me included) enjoy driving, some even class it as a hobby (I'm not quite at that stage yet).
Track days. The occasions when I have actively enjoyed driving a car comprise a fairly small proportion of the occasions I have driven a car. The smile factor is much bigger when it comes to riding a motorbike, but I have had my share of gritting my teeth through bad weather, or inching along in the heat, humidity and motorbike jams in Ho Chi Minh City rush hour. If I could sit back and get an extra hour's sleep or read a book on my commute, rather than having to pilot my vehicle - yes, please.
 
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