The March Of Technology

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
31,398
Reaction score
18,200
Points
309
Far be it from me to stand in the way of technology, but why not save a bit of money and use a paper towel?
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,247
Reaction score
9,098
Points
284
Secrets of the Super Elements

Forget oil, coal and gas - a new set of materials is shaping our world and they're so bizarre they may as well be alien technology. In the first BBC documentary to be filmed entirely on smartphones, material scientist Prof Mark Miodownik reveals the super elements that underpin our high-tech world. We have become utterly dependent on them, but they are rare and they're already running out. The stuff that makes our smartphones work could be gone in a decade and our ability to feed the world depends mostly on a mineral found in just one country. Mark reveals the magical properties of these extraordinary materials and finds out what we can do to save them.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08rv9r6/secrets-of-the-super-elements

Educational and entertaining!
 

hunck

Antediluvian
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
5,626
Reaction score
7,857
Points
284
Location
Hobbs End
World's biggest plane that will carry rockets to edge of SPACE emerges from hangar for the first time

The aircraft, developed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's aerospace firm Stratolaunch Systems , has a wingspan of 385 feet - the longest wingspan of any aircraft ever built.

It measures 238 feet long from nose to tail, stands 50 feet tall from the ground to the top of the vertical tail, and rolls around on 28 wheels.

The Stratolaunch aircraft is powered by six 747 aircraft engines and is designed to act as an airborne rocket launcher, carrying rockets weighing up to 550,000lbs (250,000kg) to an altitude where they can be fired into space.

The rockets attach to the wings of the plane, between the two fuselages. When the plane reaches altitude, it releases the rockets, which then fire their boosters and launch into space from the air.

Launching rockets in this way requires a lot less fuel than launching them from the ground, because at that altitude they only need a small boost to escape the Earth's atmosphere.

Stratolaunch has already signed a deal with aerospace company Orbital ATK to carry its Pegasus XL rockets, which are used to launch small satellites into low Earth orbit.


It's claimed the plane could carry & launch 3 rockets at a time. They'd have to be fairly small - looks like it could break in two fairly easily & must be a bit of nightmare to land.
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
20,251
Reaction score
27,924
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
What happens if the fella on the left hand side turns left at the same time as the fella on the right turns right?
The flight controls are all located on one side ...
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
20,251
Reaction score
27,924
Points
309
Location
Out of Bounds
So the guy on the other side just gets to put his feet up and read the paper? ...
The single flight deck is in the right / starboard fuselage.

The analogous area in the left / port fuselage is used for data systems.

Stratolaunch's own diagram mentions flight crew being housed in the right / starboard fuselage alone.

It's the same general configuration (two fuselages; one flight control cockpit) used on the bizarro dual-bodied warplanes from the 1940's / 1950's.
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,247
Reaction score
9,098
Points
284
Here's another version of Bernard Lovell and the Jodrell Bank radio telescope. I almost didn't bother to watch it, thinking I must have seen it before, but it is new to me, so perhaps to you too:

Timeshift - Series 15: 6. How Britain Won the Space Race: The Story of Bernard Lovell and Jodrell Bank

The unlikely story of how one man with some ex-WWII army equipment eventually turned a muddy field in Cheshire into a key site in the space race. That man was Bernard Lovell, and his telescope at Jodrell Bank would be used at the height of the Cold War by both the Americans and the Russians to track their competing spacecraft. It also put Britain at the forefront of radio astronomy, a new science which transformed our knowledge of space and provided the key to understanding the most mind-bending theory of the beginnings of the universe - the Big Bang.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episod...-the-story-of-bernard-lovell-and-jodrell-bank
I'm rewatching this now on iPlayer, and although the earlier stuff seemed familiar, it became less familiar as the programme went on. But anyway it's well worth watching again. It celebrates a great British achievement and a great scientist. Enjoy!
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,247
Reaction score
9,098
Points
284
Yes, I obviously hadn't seen it all first time around. I wasn't aware that Lovell once considered entering the priesthood, or that his ideas were discussed with Stanley Kubrick before the making of 2001.

The images of Jodrell Bank show something that wasn't referred to in the commentary, the fact that a new and more accurate dish was built over the original one. The earlier photos show the original thin dish, while later images show a dish with a much thicker rim.

The same thing happened to the original GPO satellite dish, Arthur, at Goonhilly in Cornwall, where I worked in 1968.
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,247
Reaction score
9,098
Points
284
Now it's being demonised for its particulate emissions, but once it was seen as a brilliant machine:
The engine that powers the world

The surprising story of the hidden powerhouse behind the globalised world, the diesel engine, a 19th-century invention that has become indispensable to the 21st century. It's a turtle-versus-hare tale in which the diesel engine races the petrol engine in a competition to replace ageing steam technology, a race eventually won hands down by diesel.

Splendidly, car enthusiast presenter Mark Evans gets excitedly hands-on with some of the many applications of Mr Diesel's - yes, there was one - original creation, from vintage submarines and tractors to locomotive trains and container ships. You'll never feel the same about that humble old diesel family car again.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06csy8c/timeshift-series-15-3-the-engine-that-powers-the-world
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
42,881
Reaction score
33,611
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
It's being demonised for its NOx emissions rather than particulates. Diesel additive (e.g. Adblue) removes the particulates.
 

hunck

Antediluvian
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
5,626
Reaction score
7,857
Points
284
Location
Hobbs End
Secrets of the Super Elements

Forget oil, coal and gas - a new set of materials is shaping our world and they're so bizarre they may as well be alien technology. In the first BBC documentary to be filmed entirely on smartphones, material scientist Prof Mark Miodownik reveals the super elements that underpin our high-tech world. We have become utterly dependent on them, but they are rare and they're already running out. The stuff that makes our smartphones work could be gone in a decade and our ability to feed the world depends mostly on a mineral found in just one country. Mark reveals the magical properties of these extraordinary materials and finds out what we can do to save them.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08rv9r6/secrets-of-the-super-elements

Educational and entertaining!
That was fascinating & somewhat sobering at the same time when it comes to the rarity of some of these elements, many of which I'd never heard of. It makes it apparent the technology & materials involved in the gadgets which we now take for granted & how scarce some of them are.

The tungsten carbide sphere demonstration where it emerges unscathed from a 20 ton roller is remarkable & the weird properties of supercooled helium just, well, weird. Neodymium magnets in wind turbines, recycling human shite & much more besides. Well worth the watch & thanks for flagging.
 

INT21

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
7,764
Reaction score
6,459
Points
279
..It's being demonised for its NOx emissions rather than particulates. Diesel additive (e.g. Adblue) removes the particulates...

Using a high percentage of biodiesel also drastically reduces these emissions. I use it myself at around 50% when I can be bothered making it. Always just before the MOT test.

INT21
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
42,881
Reaction score
33,611
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
..It's being demonised for its NOx emissions rather than particulates. Diesel additive (e.g. Adblue) removes the particulates...

Using a high percentage of biodiesel also drastically reduces these emissions. I use it myself at around 50% when I can be bothered making it. Always just before the MOT test.

INT21
That's a good idea. I wish I had the space in the garage for doing that myself.
Recycled cooking oil actually smells good, much nicer than diesel exhaust fumes.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
42,881
Reaction score
33,611
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
That is a pretty revolutionary design! I can see that some people are still making innovative designs with clockwork mechanisms.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
42,881
Reaction score
33,611
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Willy Wonka's lift technology is now available!
http://www.wired.co.uk/article/thyssenkrupp-multi-maglev-elevator

The Wonkavator is real! Behold the maglev Multi lift that goes up, down and left to right
The Wonkavator can go sideways, and slantways, and longways, and backways, and square ways, and front ways. More than 45 years later, multinational conglomerate ThyssenKrupp is turning Roald Dahl's fiction into fact.

In Rottweil, 100 kilometres south-east of Stuttgart, stands the Tower of Light – a 246-metre concrete tower that houses a €4,000-a-day conference room, a 360-degree viewing platform (Europe’s highest), and a series of 12 shafts built specifically for testing elevators.

The £43 million tower was designed by architects Helmut Jahn and Werner Sobek. Due to be completed in July, the final step is to put an elegant corkscrew sheath of nearly indestructible, translucent material that changes colour as the sun moves across the sky.
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
31,398
Reaction score
18,200
Points
309
Best start work on that anti-Vermicious Knid technology now.
 

rynner2

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Aug 7, 2001
Messages
55,247
Reaction score
9,098
Points
284
More retro-technology examined:
Secret of how Roman concrete survived tidal battering for 2,000 years revealed
Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
3 July 2017 • 6:00pm

It is a mystery that continues to baffle modern engineers. Why do 2,000-year-old Roman piers survive to this day, yet modern concrete seawalls embedded with steel crumble within decades?
Even Pliny the Elder, writing in Naturalis Historia in 79AD, noted that concrete structures in ancient harbours, ‘become a single stone mass, impregnable to the waves, and every day stronger,’ despite being constantly battered by seawater.

Now scientists in the US think they have found the answer, and it could finally lead to modern sea defences which withstand time and tide.
They discovered that when saltwater mixes with the volcanic ash and lime used by Roman builders, it leads to the growth of interlocking minerals, which bring a virtually impenetrable cohesion to concrete.

"We're looking at a system that's contrary to everything one would want in cement-based concrete," said Prof Marie Jackson, a geology and geophysics research professor at the University of Utah who led the study.
"We're looking at a system that thrives in open chemical exchange with seawater."

Roman engineers made concrete by mixing volcanic ash with lime and seawater to make a mortar, and then added chunks of volcanic rock. The combination of ash, water, and lime produces what is called a pozzolanic reaction, named after the city of Pozzuoli in the Bay of Naples, triggering the formation of crystals in the gaps of the mixture as it sets.

etc...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...survived-tidal-battering-2000-years-revealed/
 

INT21

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jul 18, 2016
Messages
7,764
Reaction score
6,459
Points
279
I don't know the Swedish for 'Vorsprung Durch Teknich' but it probably applies to Volvo's announcement that they are switching to all electric and hybrid cars in two years.

And Hanoi to ban motorcycles by 2030.

It's all change folks. will be interesting to see what happens to the cost of electricity in various parts of the world when all this kicks in.
Also some countries already have power supply problems as it is.

Question.

A tower block has, say 100 families. Each has a car.

How do they recharge the batteries ?

INT21
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
42,881
Reaction score
33,611
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Question.

A tower block has, say 100 families. Each has a car.

How do they recharge the batteries ?
They don't.
The whole idea of a complete switch-over to electric cars is just not going to work.
This could be 'bye-bye Volvo' as well.
 

Anonymous-50446

Gone But Not Forgotten
(ACCOUNT RETIRED)
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
8,859
Reaction score
10,884
Points
279
They don't.
The whole idea of a complete switch-over to electric cars is just not going to work.
This could be 'bye-bye Volvo' as well.
A million electric cars is very roughly a whole power station's output.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
42,881
Reaction score
33,611
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
A million electric cars is very roughly a whole power station's output.
Yes. And we're not building power stations very fast. Also, forget solar panels - not enough output to run a charger. Also...don't work at night.
 

Analogue Boy

Bar 6
Joined
Aug 10, 2005
Messages
11,183
Reaction score
10,727
Points
309
I don't know the Swedish for 'Vorsprung Durch Teknich' but it probably applies to Volvo's announcement that they are switching to all electric and hybrid cars in two years.

And Hanoi to ban motorcycles by 2030.

It's all change folks. will be interesting to see what happens to the cost of electricity in various parts of the world when all this kicks in.
Also some countries already have power supply problems as it is.

Question.

A tower block has, say 100 families. Each has a car.

How do they recharge the batteries ?

INT21
Where they park them. Provision for charging should now be a consideration in town planning.
 
Top