The Monster Of Florence

river_styx

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This is supposedly the return of an italian serial killer who operated within the city of Florence during a time period of two decades.
Despite the fact that the cheif suspect in that case died before he could face a re-trial and the rest of the suspects would all be in their eighties by now the original Monster of Florence case remains unsolved.

The crimes are detailed here
http://www.crimelibrary.com/serial_killers/predators/monster_florence/index.htm

The one fact about this case that interests me the most is the suspicion that the killings were carried out by a religious cult. All the victims were shot with the same gun and mutilated in the same way. That is until later during the 1980s when for some reason the killer(s) started removing other body parts (Maybe this was a sign that the killer was just becoming more confident?).
The cheif suspect, Pietro Pacciani had stated that he was a member of a satanic cult presided over by a doctor.
This went unproven and there is no mention of a doctor being arrested, although some were possibly questioned and the killer was suspected of having surgical knowledge.

If a doctor was responsible for the killings this might resolve some of the many unanswered questions still remaining.

What do others think?
 

Spookyangel

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If most of the suspects are in their 80s and the killings have started again, I would think this was a copy cat killer instead of the same person.
 

river_styx

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Well from what the first link states no one has actually been killed yet.
It appears that someone is mutilating corpses in the city morgue despite there being a heavy police presence both inside and outside the building.
I thought maybe it's a necrophile or a ghoul. It's truly quite fascinating
 

dot23

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Cult theory in Italy murder probe

From the BBC

Italian police are looking at the theory that Satanists may have been behind a series of gruesome murders.
They believe a cult may have ordered the killing of eight couples between 1968 and 1985 and kept some body parts.

Farm worker Pietro Pacciani, dubbed the Monster of Florence, was convicted of the crimes in 1994 but later released on the basis of flaws in the evidence.

Following new evidence, a pharmacist and three other Florentine professionals are being questioned.

Witness reports of female genitalia and body parts in the fridge of a Tuscan villa linked to a suspected Satanist led police to reopen the case.

The villa had been rented by a doctor thought to have drowned in a lake in Tuscany in 1985 according to Reuters news agency.

Rituals

The man, who police now think was murdered, is suspected of having been part of a Satanic group who ordered Pacciani and two accomplices to carry out the killings.

"The eight double homicides were carried out according to a criminal plan on two levels," a judicial source told Reuters.

"The execution was entrusted to [Pacciani and his friends] but a group of people who celebrated rituals and black magic put the arms in their hands."

Pacciani died in 1998, two years after his release on appeal and while he was facing a retrial, whilst the two other men were convicted of aiding him

The Guardian newspaper says two previous independent investigations suggested an occult link to the murders.

The victims were shot during romantic trysts in the Tuscan countryside and many suffered sexual mutilations.

'Hannibal'

Police investigating the 60-year-old pharmacist seized pornographic material from his home.

His lawyer told the Guardian he did not believe his client had anything to do with the killings.

A dermatologist, a businessman and a lawyer from Florence were also being questioned.

The trial of Pacciani, who was given 16 life sentences, was attended by Silence of the Lambs author Thomas Harris who was fascinated by the case.

The fruits of his research in the Chianti region appear in Hannibal, with references to "Il Mostro".

Pacciani died in 1998 at the age of 73 before a retrial.
 

ginoide

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the whole mostro di firenze (monster of florence) story is very complicated, scary and puzzling

pietro pacciani (the main character in the plot, as far as we know) spent some time in jail for killing a man when he was young; later he was suspected of molesting his daughter (i'm afraid that was more than a suspect, IIRC). he could barely speak italian, he wasn't exactly the refined and subtle type, if you get my drift...
and yet he probably managed to commit the perfect crime(s). they didn't manage to convincingly prove him guilty, and then he died.
the fact that he didn't seem smart enough to commit the perfect crime by himselg is what makes people (and investigators) think that there had to be some kind of bigger plot behind him.
disturbing stuff, anyway. i remember going camping in tuscany in the mid 80's and being given some kind of warning leaflets.
 

river_styx

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It's all spookily similar to the Son of Sam.
The search for the global satanic cult starts here.
 

Mighty_Emperor

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The link to the monster of Florence stuff on that BBC page is broken but I got the report:

The Monster of Florence

Never has a serial killer had a more beautiful and cultured backdrop on which to act out his horrendous fantasies.

The Monster of Florence carried out his grisly murders over a 17-year period in camping grounds and lovers' lanes in the serene Tuscan countryside surrounding Florence, the jewel of the Italian renaissance.

What makes the case of The Monster (Il Mostro) so fascinating are the conspiracy theories involving well-connected and seemingly respectable doctors and artists and the whiff of the occult which persist to this day.

In August 2001 the Florentine authorities reopened the case amid speculation they were investigating a group of up to a dozen wealthy Italians who orchestrated the ritualistic killings by manipulating a trio of voyeuristic peasants.

It is no coincidence the author of Silence of The Lambs, Thomas Harris, chose to set much of the sequel, Hannibal, in Florence. Harris had sat through the trial of Pietro Pacciani - who was convicted of seven of the eight murders but later freed on appeal, only to die mysteriously before he could face a retrial - and kept himself up to date on the twists and turns in the case.

In the novel he chose to relocate Dr Hannibal Lecter to Florence, where he takes up a job as the custodian of the Capponi Library's priceless collection of renaissance manuscripts and artworks while continuing to harbour and act out his depraved fantasies.
The killings begin

The real killings began one hot night in the summer of 1968 but at the time they appeared to be nothing more than a domestic tragedy. Barbara Locci, from the town of Lastra a Signa, a few miles down the River Arno from Florence, was found shot dead in the Alfa Romeo car in which she had been cavorting with her lover, Antonio Lo Bianco.

Locci, 32, was a notoriously promiscuous housewife, who had taken several lovers and was known locally as The Queen Bee. On the night of 21 August 1968 she had gone to the cinema with Lo Bianco and her young son Natalino. The boy had fallen asleep in the back of the car so Locci and Lo Bianco had driven to a quiet spot to make love.

The killer crept up on them and fired eight shots.

He then picked up the boy - who must have been woken by the gunfire - and carried him to a nearby farm before fleeing into the darkness.

Natalino knocked on the door of the farmhouse and told the farmer: "My mother and my uncle are dead."

The carabinieri immediately suspected Locci's husband, a cuckold called Stefano Mele, and when they arrived at his home they found him with a suitcase already packed as if about to make a quick getaway.

Mele was interviewed and, after initially pointing the finger at one of Locci's numerous lovers, he confessed and incriminated a friend, Salvatore Vinci, claiming he had lent him a gun. Mele later retracted his entire confession and began blaming Vinci's brother, Francesco, who had also been "intimate" with Locci.

His frequent changes of story did not enamour him to the police or the judges and in 1970 he was found guilty and jailed for 14 years, a lenient sentence which was partly due to the belief that he was insane.

Then there was another double killing ...

The killings at Signa had been forgotten by 1974. Then, one moonless night in September teenage lovers Pasquale Gentilcore and Stefania Pettini parked up in their Fiat 127 overlooking the River Sieve in Borgo San Lorenzo, a few miles north of Florence.

They were enjoying a romantic time until someone fired ten shots at them. But on this occasion the murderer went further. He stabbed Gentilcore twice and then lifted Pettini out of the little car and began slashing at her with a knife. All in all she received 96 knife wounds.

This time there were no obvious suspects.

One man had walked into a police station and confessed to the murders but he turned out to be mentally unstable and was unable to describe in detail how the killings had been carried out. The police, unaware of the link with the 1968 murder and unable to find any viable suspects, filed it away unsolved.
The turning point

Seven years later, on another warm summer's night, there was another double slaying. On 6 June 1981 someone fired eight shots into a Fiat Ritmo car containing Giovanni Foggi and his lover, Carmela De Nuccio. Again the killer had the time and the inclination to develop his perversions.
This time the female victim was lifted from the car, laid in a ditch and stabbed in the abdomen and had her genital region completely removed with a degree of surgical deliberation. As in the 1974 murders her purse was emptied onto the ground beside the car.

The similarities with the Gentilcore and Pettini case were glaringly obvious and the carabinieri immediately set about comparing the Winchester bullets found in all four bodies. Sure enough they had been fired from the same .22 Beretta pistol and came from the same batch of ammunition. Florence suddenly had a serial killer on its hands.

But still no-one made the connection with the 1968 crimes.

Police soon honed in on Enzo Spalletti, a peeping tom who had told his wife he had read about the murder of Foggi and De Nuccio in the newspaper, even though they were not reported until the following day. He was arrested and taken into custody pending a trial.
Freeing the scapegoats

Four months later Spalletti was freed from jail when another couple were murdered - a crime he plainly could not have committed.

The victims, Stefano Baldi and Susanna Cambi, had been shot dead at a beauty spot north west of Florence and she had suffered similar indignities as Carmela De Nuccio. The following summer another couple were targeted as they put their clothes back on after having sex in a car parked up in Montespertoli, south west of Florence.

Antonella Migliorini died instantly but Paolo Mainardi, 22, survived the initial burst of gunfire. He turned the Seat car's ignition key, slammed it into reverse but ended up in a ditch. The killer, with the sort of coolness and callousness seen in a thousand Hollywood films, strolled over, shot out the car's headlights, pulled the car keys from Paolo's feeble grasp and threw them into the darkened undergrowth.
The fatally injured young mechanic survived until the next morning but died in hospital and was unable to give the police any vital clues.
Mistaken identity

A few days after the murder of Mainardi and Migliorini, Sergeant Francesco Fiore recalled the murder of Locci and Lo Bianco, committed in 1968 when he was assigned to Signa. Sgt Fiore insisted the shells from The Monster's crimes be compared with the 1968 murders - tests revealed they came from a single box of 50 Winchester bullets and had been fired from the same weapon, a Beretta .22-calibre pistol.

Were the police finally making the right connnections, or would this monster continue his killing spree?

The carabinieri did not immediately free Stefano Mele but assumed he must have had an accomplice, who had continued the murders after his incarceration. They interviewed Mele again but he continued to claim his complete innocence.

In August 1982 police arrested Francesco Vinci, who Mele had first accused 14 years earlier, but events were soon to prove his innocence. When the killer struck again in September 1983 he chose two men although it seems certain he believed one was a woman because of his long hair.

Wilhelm Horst Meyer and his friend Uwe Rusch Sens, both 24, were asleep in a Volkswagen camper van when The Monster paid them a visit. He fired through the window killing the German holidaymakers instantly.

Vinci had been in custody at the time but his lawyer failed to persuade judges to release him on the grounds that he clearly could not have carried out the latest murders. State Prosecutor Mario Rotella continued to work on the basis that the crimes were committed by a gang of Sardinian-born peasants, of which Mele had been a member.

They arrested his brother Giovanni, and Stefano's friend Piero Mucciarini, who remained in custody until a few months after the next murders - of Claudio Stefanacci and Pia Rontini - in July 1984.
Last killing

The Monster of Florence finally ended his killing spree on 8 September 1985. He slashed open a tent on a campsite at San Casciano, south of Florence, and fired several shots into the bodies of French tourists Jean Michel Kraveichvilj and Nadine Mauriot. Kraveichvilj managed to get to his feet and scrambled out of the tent but he was chased and stabbed to death after getting only a few yards.

The killer returned to the tent, dragged out Mauriot's body and began to mutilate her. The following day an envelope arrived at the office of the public prosecutor. Inside was a sheet of paper folded and, and inside that was a small plastic bag containing a cube of flesh from Mauriot's body.

The killer was taunting the police.


Back to square one

In 1986 the authorities finally admitted their strategy of focusing on the "Sardinians" was wrong. They began again from scratch and questioned 100,000 people in an attempt to get to the bottom of the mystery.

By 1991 several leads seemed to point in the direction of Pietro Pacciani, a farm labourer with convictions for murder, wife-beating and sexual molestation.

Anecdotal evidence suggested Pacciani, and another man Mario Vanni, were involved in occult ceremonies at a house in San Casciano, using female body parts and presided over by a mysterious doctor.

Pacciani finally went on trial in November 1994 and Italy was gripped by the televised proceedings. The 69-year-old protested his innocence but he was convicted of 14 murders largely on circumstantial evidence and sentenced to life.

He was dragged from court screaming: "I am as innocent as Christ on the cross".

In February 1996 an appeal court cleared Pacciani but later that year he was ordered to face a retrial.

Meanwhile his friend, Mario Vanni, 70, and another man, Giancarlo Lotti, 54, were arrested and eventually convicted of their involvement in five of the double murders. Vanni was jailed for life, Lotti for 26 years.

But the story was going to take yet another twist ...

On 23 February 1998 the case took a sinister turn when Pacciani, who was awaiting a second trial, was found dead.

He was found face down on the floor of his home with his trousers at his ankles and his shirt up around his neck.

His face was blue and disfigured and police thought Pacciani, who was 71, had died of a heart attack.

But a post-mortem examination showed that a combination of drugs had caused his death. The investigating magistrate, Paolo Canessa, believed Pacciani had been murdered in case he revealed more details about the murderous cult at his retrial.

With Pacciani dead and Vanni and Lotti in jail, the story appeared to be over. So far nothing has come of the new inquiry and the suggestion of a sinister cabal of the great and the good remains simply a conspiracy theory and the case remains officially unsolved.
The victims:

21 Aug 1968: Antonio Lo Bianco and Barbara Locci, 32
15 Sep 1974: Pasquale Gentilcore, 19, and Stefania Pettini, 18
6 Jun 1981: Giovanni Foggi, 30 and Carmela De Nuccio, 21
17 Apr 1977 - Alexander Esau, 20, and Valentina Suriani, 18
23 Oct 1981: Stefano Baldi, 26, and Susanna Cambi, 24
19 Jun 1982: Paolo Mainardi, 22, and Antonella Migliorini, 20
9 Sept 1983: Wilhelm Horst Meyer and Uwe Rusch Sens, both 24
29 Jul 1984: Claudio Stefanacci, 21, and Pia Rontini, 18
8 Sep 1985: Jean Michel Kraveichvilj, 25 and Nadine Mauriot, 36

This profile of Pietro Pacciani was written by BBC News Online's Chris Summers.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/crime/caseclosed/florence1.shtml
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Link was posted in another thread - I like the idea of a "Magic Ritual Men's Club" I assume the Hierophant is a member:

Magic ritual men's club suspected of killing couples

January 24, 2004


In a new twist to a decades-old string of gruesome slayings, prosecutors are investigating whether a secret club of professional men ordered the killings of eight couples who were parked in their cars or camped in the Tuscan countryside to obtain body parts for use in magic rituals.

Some of the women murdered in the slayings - carried out by the so-called "monster of Florence" between 1968 and 1985 - were mutilated with a knife or screwdriver and their body parts, including genitals, were gouged out and taken from the murder scenes.

Four people are now under investigation for allegedly being part of an occult ring that ordered a farmhand and two other local men to carry out the killings, a defence lawyer for one of the suspects said today.

Prosecutors alleged that "the instigators of the killings wanted to collect the body parts" for use in ceremonies and magic rites, said defence attorney Gabriele Zanobini.

Zanobini represents Francesco Calamandrei, a 63-year-old retired pharmacist who prosecutors allege is among those who ordered the slayings.

Calamandrei denies the charges, Zanobini said in a telephone interview from his office in Florence.

In 1994, an Italian court convicted Pietro Pacciani - a farmhand dubbed "the monster of Florence" by the Italian media - of the murder of seven of the couples and sentenced him to life in prison.

An appeals court acquitted him in 1996, and he died in 1998 while waiting for Italy's top criminal court to rule on a further appeal. The same year judges sentenced two other men, Giancarlo Lotti and Mario Vanni, for some of the murders.

Milan daily Corriere della Sera said they seized pornographic videos as well as books and documents in a search of Calamandrei's home Tuesday, but Zanobini says they found nothing incriminating.

Prosecutors are homing in on links between Calamandrei and Francesco Narducci, a doctor found dead in Lake Trasimeno, 90 kilometres south of Florence, in 1985, Italian media have reported.

Police at first considered Narducci's death an accident, but now suspect he had links to the ring, the Italian news reports said. When they dug up Narducci's body, investigators concluded that he had been strangled, Corriere della Sera said.

Others suspected members of the ring include a 70-year-old university dermatologist who specialises in venereal diseases, an entrepreneur, and a lawyer, the Italian news agency ANSA said.

The case "is still in the investigative stage and we are waiting for some concrete evidence", said Zanobini.

Prosecutors apparently haven't laid out the motive which would have induced the killers to allegedly follow orders.

The slayings attracted heavy coverage at home and abroad. Two of the victims were French and two were German.

Among members of the public who attended some of Pacciani's trial was Thomas Harris, author of Silence of the Lambs. His sequel, Hannibal, is based in Florence.

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/01/24/1074732635133.html
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Good (if lengthy) report:

Murder most foul

June 9, 2004



Eight double murders have been attributed to the "Monster of Florence". But is just one man to blame? Or a satanic sect? Tobias Jones reports on the latest disturbing developments in a 36-year mystery.

The story of the Monster of Florence has gripped and horrified Italy for almost four decades.

It's a chilling tale with an extraordinary cast: wizards, doctors, chemists, thuggish peasants, the secret services.

At every twist, there's evidence of macabre sexual and supernatural practices. In all, there were 16 murders, always of courting couples, always at night, usually in their cars; many more if you count the "satellite murders" and suspicious suicides at the fringes of the case.

Almost a dozen men have been named, by the press and police, as the Monster; several have committed suicide (the most recent in January this year) before being posthumously cleared.

But now, almost 36 years since the first killing, one dogged policeman in Florence believes he's on the brink of solving the case; within months, he says, we may finally know the identity of the Monster of Florence.

The policeman, Michele Giuttari, is a Sicilian who found fame as the chief investigator of the Mafia bombs that ripped through Florence in 1993. Since May 2003, he has headed a 10-man "anti-Monster taskforce".

"These crimes," he says, "are unique throughout the world for their cruelty and ferocity. They are black, brutal crimes."

And they are crimes that speak to a worldwide, and fearful, fascination with the occult: Giuttari has hinted that the murders involved a satanic sect.

"There are certainly," he says cautiously, "ritualistic aspects, which seem to have a relevance: the fact that the same weapon was always used; the fact that the female bodies were never touched by a hand, but only by a blade — even the clothes were cut away with a knife; the fact that the tombs of the victims have frequently been defaced and commemorative crosses vandalised. All these things make an investigator curious."

A satanic sect, the hypothesis runs, commissioned the murders in order to obtain intimate parts of female flesh for use in depraved rituals in the Tuscan countryside; esoteric stone circles (and a curious granite pyramid) found at some of the murder sites hint at black magic.

Giuttari's theory tallies with the thesis developed in a report prepared for the Italian secret services in 1985. Written by Francesco Bruno, the most famous criminologist in Italy, the report was, inexplicably, never passed to the police; Giuttari came upon it only two years ago.

Both men now believe the report may have been buried to protect a Monster who had powerful allies.

Nineteen years on, Bruno stands by his conclusion: the murders had a "mystical, almost religious motivation. The killer acted only on certain days, in certain areas. He was almost a moralist, punishing unmarried couples; he killed before sex began. And he always killed the woman on the ground, sacrificing her to Mother Earth. It was a kind of purification."

Local people are more sceptical. Any new "revelation" is met with understandable suspicion — each previous "breakthrough" has proved embarrassingly inadequate.

In the absence of any convincing narrative to explain the murders, dietrologia (conspiracy theorising) has become the only tool available.

Today, if you walk in the countryside surrounding Florence, the scene is arcadian.

There are olive groves, cypresses and poplars on the gentle hills; you can see and smell the rosemary, laurel and rucola. There is nothing, other than the occasional crucifix on the side of a clearing or footpath, to remind you of the murders.

The story begins (or so everyone thought) in September 1974. A Fiat 127 is parked by the river Sieve, just to the north of Florence.

Like millions of young Italians living at home with their parents, Pasquale Gentilcore and Stefania Pettini are about to make love in a car.

As the couple undress, eight bullets end their lives. Stefania is dragged from the car and stabbed 97 times; 70 of the wounds follow the outline of her vagina, in which the killer places a vine shoot.

When the couple's bodies are found the next day, the only hard evidence is the eight Winchester H-series cartridges at the scene of the crime.

It is a vile murder but, seemingly, an isolated one. But in June 1981, the Monster strikes again, this time to the south-west of the city.

Giovanni Foggi and Carmela de Nuccio have parked under a cypress tree and are undressing. Once again, the couple are shot.

Then the murderer drags Carmela from the car and commits the act that will become his gruesome signature: he removes her labia.

When the bodies are found the following morning, the same Hseries cartridges are there, along with something to which, at the time, no attention is paid: a coloured granite pyramid 15 metres from the scene of the crime.

This time the police appear to make a breakthrough. Before the crime has even been discovered, 40-year-old Vincenzo Spalletti recounts details of the murder to his friends. Such knowledge appears to be explained by only one thing, and Spalletti is arrested on June 17.

What emerges from his interrogation shocks the city: surrounding the couples making love in what Italians call the camporella are, it turns out, hundreds of voyeurs, equipped with microphones and infrared cameras.

Spalletti has clearly seen something; so, possibly, have dozens of others. But no one comes forward with information, and while Spalletti is still in custody, the Monster strikes again.

It is September 1981; at Calenzano, to the north-west of Florence, Stefano Baldi and Susanna Cambi are murdered in their black Golf.

Again, Winchester H-series cartridges are found; again, the woman is mutilated. And now forensic tests show that in each crime the same weapon has been used: a .22 Beretta rifle.

As panic grips the city, hundreds of old scores are settled: exlovers are denounced, anonymous letters reveal sordid sexual secrets. The police are overwhelmed with useless leads.

The Monster strikes again in June 1982. This time, the male driver, initially only wounded, manages to manoeuvre his Seat 147 back on to the main road before he and his companion are killed but, due to the visibility of the location, not mutilated.

Suddenly, a senior policeman recalls an almost identical crime way back in 1968; a couple had been murdered to the west of Florence as they made love in a car.

Forensic tests reveal that H-series Winchester bullets were fired from exactly the same weapon used in the subsequent Monster murders.

The 1968 murder only serves to complicate matters; the murdered woman, Barbara Locci, had indeed been in the car with a lover — one of dozens.

The snag for those investigating the Monster crimes is that her husband, Stefano — like her, and like many of her lovers, a Sardinian — had been convicted of the 1968 murder and had been in prison ever since.

Clearly, he cannot have committed the later crimes; people begin to suspect that he hadn't even committed the original one.

So begins what is called the pista Sarda, the Sardinian line of inquiry. All of Locci's violent and possessive lovers are questioned; one, Francesco Vinci, is arrested and accused of all the killings.

But while he is in custody, the Monster strikes again; in September 1983, at Giogoli, he kills two more people. This time, though, it's a gay couple from Germany in a Volkswagen camper van. (One of the murdered men had long, blond hair; he may have been mistaken for a woman.) Vinci is released.

In July 1984, another couple are murdered, and again the woman is mutilated. The last double murder occurs in September 1985. A French couple are undressing in their tent at San Casciano.

They appear not to have noticed the posters stuck up all over the area. "Watch out, kids," the warning reads in seven languages. "You could be attacked."

Not only is the woman mutilated, but part of her breast is posted to the sole woman on the police team. As in all the other cases, Hseries Winchester cartridges had been fired from a Beretta .22 rifle.

Initially, the evidence against Pietro Pacciani appeared compelling. The subject of an anonymous tip-off to police in 1992, he lived in San Casciano, the hill town outside which the last couple had been murdered.

In the 1950s, he had murdered a man who was wooing his girlfriend (he then forced her to have sex with him next to the man's corpse).

He later married, and was convicted of raping his two daughters. Police bugged his house, then raided his property. They found a German-made notebook, which may have belonged to one of the murdered Germans; and they found, in Pacciani's garden, an H-series cartridge.

Pacciani was brought to trial, and the public was hypnotised by an explosive courtroom performance from a bullish, theatrical peasant.

Equally mesmerised was Thomas Harris, author of the Hannibal Lecter books; after attending the trial, he set his sequel to The Silence of the Lambs in Florence.

In November 1994, Pacciani was sentenced to life for seven of the eight double murders; he was acquitted of the 1968 murder.

But in February 1996, he was cleared on appeal. This was no surprise to many journalists and criminologists: the cartridge found in his garden appeared all too convenient, almost as if it had been placed there; the German notepad contained passages written by Pacciani long before the Germans' murder; there was no trace of the famous murder weapon.

Just days before Pacciani's successful appeal, two of his closest friends were arrested. The trial of Giancarlo Lotti and Mario Vanni was another insight into the sexual underworld of Tuscany.

The two coarse, ageing men would go to the city to visit prostitutes and participate in orgies at the house of a practitioner of black magic called Salvatore Indovino, who died shortly after the last murder.

Indovino, apparently, offered his services as a magician to young couples, assuring them that the surest way to cement their relationship was to make love in public; all they had to do was tell him the time, place and number-plate. Vanni and Lotti, the accusation went, did the rest.

The two received life sentences for the last five murders in March 1998. A month earlier, Pacciani had died, a higher court having overturned his acquittal. His retrial was pending.

It is an outcome many observers find highly unsatisfactory. These critics believe that Pacciani, Lotti and Vanni had played a part in some murders, but not in all of them. Evidence was scant, to say the least.

And there were too many loose ends and too many other inexplicable murders. Francesco Vinci, the former Sardinian suspect, had been murdered along with a friend in 1993, burnt to death in the locked boot of an old Volvo. Pacciani had been in custody at the time.

Two weeks later, a mother and son (the mother was a former lover of Vinci's) were also burnt to death while locked in a car.

In May 1994, another woman, friendly with Vinci's son, was murdered. While in prison, Pacciani alluded to these killings, hinting that the real Monster was still at large, murdering anyone who had any information.

"For any investigator," says Giuttari, "one coincidence is one too many. Here there are dozens."

Now, though, Giuttari says that he's on the verge of a real breakthrough. "What really impeded the investigation for decades," he says, "was the idea that we were looking for a single, isolated serial killer.

"The change in our philosophy meant we looked instead for a group, a team of killers. Because it's obvious from the evidence that a different hand committed different crimes.

"The rifle passed from hand to hand. There was an organisation behind these murders in which it appears the executioners were paid."

He cites the fact that Pacciani — a part-time gardener who had served long jail sentences — had two houses, and 50 million lire of savings (around $A45,000), as evidence that someone was paying Pacciani handsomely.

Another turning point in Giuttari's investigations came in 2002. Police tapping the phones of a loan-sharking ring in Umbria heard one borrower being threatened: "If you don't pay up, you'll end up like the doctor on (Lake) Trasimeno" — clearly a reference to Francesco Narducci, a 36-year-old doctor found dead in the lake in 1985.

Witness statements declare that Narducci had a flat outside Florence, that his refrigerator held body parts and that he was a member of an esoteric group named the "Red Rose".

Some police had long suspected a medic's involvement in the Monster killings; Vanni even said that "a doctor had commissioned little jobs".

It was suggested that the organisation behind the murders had disposed of Narducci to prevent him talking.

The police toiled on. Then, at the end of January this year, a well-known doctor from Florence was formally given notice that he was under investigation, as was a retired chemist from San Casciano, whose house was raided by police.

Both men's lawyers deny that their clients had any involvement with the killings.

Gianluca Monastra, the author of an eloquent book on the killings, is convinced by the theory of commissioned murders.

"For years any evidence which didn't fit with the individual serial killer profile was brushed under the carpet.

"I do believe that there were people operating at a higher level who in a sense 'remote-controlled' the murderers. It would be a plausible explanation, even if extreme and extraordinary."

The criminologist, Francesco Bruno, however, remains dismissive of the theory. The problem, according to Bruno, is that Giuttari is having to build his investigation on "erroneous judicial foundations", namely the convictions of Pacciani's friends, Vanni and Lotti. They don't fit Bruno's profile of a single, cold and calculating killer.

"Giuttari is fishing in the right waters," Bruno says, "amongst the strange world of satanism, but he's very far from catching the right person, if he's even still alive.

"Everything so far has been village gossip and building on old material."

Bruno believes the Beretta .22 passed from the Sardinian circle after the 1968 crime and that the following 14 murders were all committed by one, lone killer.

Meanwhile, Giuttari has just published a novel; in an unfortunate coincidence, names of suspects in the Monster case emerged just around publication date.

The "novel" (about a detective called Michele investigating gruesome murders in Tuscany) shot up the bestseller lists. Fact and fiction, fantasy and reality, are becoming blurred — but that, after all, is the Italian way.

Currently free to view but will require registration in the future:

http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/06/08/1086460294732.html?oneclick=true

See also this other thread (although it did get off topic quicky):

http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=4426

Is it a coincidnece that we have another double 'satanic' murder in Italy:

http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=15766

Emps
 

river_styx

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The more you read about these killings the more puzzling the whole thing becomes. You follow one path just to reach a dead end and have to start all over again which I'm sure is incredibly frustrating for the police officers involved.
I'm still of the opinion that there is a satanic sect operating on a global scale. Unfortunately as with all good conspiracies to say so makes one sound ridiculous (not that that's ever stopped me)

But remember that until a few years ago most people were unaware that there was a Europe wide syndicate of peodophiles operating for well over a decade.


I'd forgotten I'd even started this thread..heh.
 

OldTimeRadio

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Cult

The odd chronological progressions of these murders, with numerous fits and starts from 1968 on, coupled with their increasing frequency after 1980, do not strike me as occult murder rituals enacted by a structured group of participants (at least some of them supposedly professional people) but rather as the crimes of a single murderer losing all control as time passes.
 

mrpoultice

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An idle supposition

OK how about a murder as a specific initialisation ritual to gain access to a society or group, the murders increasing as the group gets larger.

The initiate being supplied with the weapon and being told what to do.

Mr P
 

OldTimeRadio

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Re: An idle supposition

mrpoultice said:
"OK how about a murder as a specific initialisation ritual to gain access to a society or group, the murders increasing as the group gets larger. The initiate being supplied with THE weapon and being told what to do."

That's a very good speculation, not merely a idle one. There have been numerous criminal gangs through history in which membership was obtained through precisely this manner, including both White and Black racialist groups right here in the States.

I've not heard of the single weapon approach before, though, but it would certainly throw the cops for a loop, which by this theory would have been the intent.

By the way, isn't a .22 an odd choice for this sort of crime? You'd think that a .38 or a .45 would be much more criminally effective.
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Police name the man behind the Monster

June 06, 2006


ROME: For almost two decades, a serial killer branded the Monster of Florence terrorised the Tuscan countryside, shooting eight courting couples, invariably at full moon, and sexually mutilating their bodies.

The killer's last victims, two French tourists, were slain near the picturesque village of San Casciano in 1985.

Now the murders, which began in 1968, have returned to haunt the tranquil haven. Prosecutors claim they have at last identified the mastermind behind the rampage.

They have accused Francesco Calamandrei, a respected former pharmacist who still lives in San Casciano, of ordering the deaths of the last five slain couples.

Mr Calamandrei, a bespectacled and overweight 65-year-old, was the first to learn of the allegations when the Florentine prosecutors, as they are obliged to do under Italian law, notified him of the outcome of their latest investigation.

The prosecutors allege Mr Calamandrei gave his orders to the three men convicted of carrying out the murders - Pietro Pacciani, Mario Vanni and Giancarlo Lotti - and paid Pacciani, a semi-literate farmer, for pieces of the female victims' bodies.

Pacciani's 1994 trial in Florence was attended by Thomas Harris, author of The Silence of the Lambs, who set part of his sequel, Hannibal, in the Italian Renaissance city.

After he was sentenced, Pacciani shouted in court that he was "as innocent as Christ on the cross".

And in his last interview before his death in 1998, Pacciani said: "The real monster must be a person of the highest intelligence, not a poor ignorant soul like me."

Investigators now allege Pacciani and the other two convicted of the murders were merely pawns in the hands of Mr Calamandrei.

In one search warrant, prosecutors wrote that "a group of people who celebrated black masses and magical rites put the weapons in their hands". A lawyer, a businessman, an artist and a former university medical professor were all suspects for a time.

But only Mr Calamandrei remains accused.

Among his victims, the magistrates claim, were Stefano Baldi and Susanna Campi, killed at a beauty spot northwest of Florence in September 1981.

Another couple, German tourists Horst Meyer and Uwe Rusch Sens, were slain as they slept in a campervan in September 1983.

The magistrates allege Mr Calamandrei not only ordered the murders but also was present at the last of the ritual slayings, the killing of French tourists Nadine Mauriot and her husband, Jean-Michel Kraveicvili.

The following day, a small plastic bag containing a cube of flesh from Mauriot's left breast arrived at the office of the public prosecutor.

Michele Giuttari, the former head of a Florence police squad who has investigated the murders for more than 10 years, has argued that the masterminds behind the Monster killings were "respectable citizens above suspicion" who formed a "satanic sect".

Vine branches were inserted in the sexual organs of the female victims. A French private detective brought in to investigate the deaths of the last victims found they had travelled to Italy to take part in satanic rituals.

Mr Calamandrei was initially linked to the Monster of Florence killings when his divorced first wife came forward to accuse him. Her testimony prompted magistrates to reopen their inquiries in early 2004. In April that year, police raided his home and seized 10 boxes of pornographic videos.

Mr Calamandrei has consistently denied any wrongdoing.

In a separate investigation in the city of Perugia, a prosecutor has accused Mr Calamandrei of ordering another murder, that of Francesco Narducci, a doctor whose body was found floating in Lake Trasimeno in 1985 after he had been strangled.

Mr Calamandrei allegedly commissioned two Sicilian brothers to carry out the killing because Narducci knew too much about the Monster crimes.

In San Casciano, the retired chemist is now shunned by most. He has dedicated himself to painting since his retirement seven years ago.

According to the local priest, Father Renzo Polidori, Mr Calamandrei's works are "strange, dark drawings, full of suffering".


-----------
The Sunday Times

www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,2 ... 03,00.html
 

Mighty_Emperor

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This article is brodering on the loony and I can't see the Litvinenko link. Tony Blair being involved i juts obvious though ;)

Alexander Litvinenko and Satanic Society Ritual Murders

By T Stokes

The police in Italy are still charging people from the "Monster of Florence" killings, which occurred between 1974 and 1985, when seven courting couples were murdered.

The attacks were always in Florence, on moonless Saturday nights, in places where the couples would gather, the couples were always shot while making love, stabbed, then mutilated by the expert removal of the vagina with a knife. 100,000 people were interviewed during the 20 years since the awful attacks took place.

In 1994, 69 year old Pietro Pacciani, an illiterate alcoholic farm labourer, with a record of rape and violence was charged and on the very flimsy evidence that he was seen near the crime scenes, was sentenced to life imprisonment.

On appeal he was released in 1996 and died conveniently before a retrial could take place. In the same year two other men known to Pacciani were also imprisoned for involvement in the murders. A moonless Saturday night, is interesting as it shows that Saturn the greater malefic is the god of choice, and as the Moon is associated with women, its reflector and protector, it had to be absent. A woman's power over men is mainly in her body, and the taking of the vagina, is symbolically and psychologically the confiscation of the nucleus of those psychic energies, into an area ruled by Saturn.

Commisario Michelle Giuttari, now head of the regional crime squad, announced that findings from a prosecutor investigating the suspicious death of a local doctor, showed ritual activity in Perugia and Florence, with new leads that suggest a satanic sect. Giuttari claimed statements of a highly respectable group of "above reproach" type citizens including magistrates, doctors, academics and the aristocracy, attended these ceremonies where women's genitalia was used. The significance and coincidence of this with the Jack the ripper killings in Victorian London, is not lost to parnormalists who often assist and advise in police investigations of this sort, with its occult genesis in the sorcerers of the Old Testament.

A new suspect has now been charged with being the "Monster of Florence" And that is Francesco Calemandrei, a wealthy pharmacist, who is said to have implicated Satanists from the very top of society, including those close to Silvio Berlusconi, the intimate circle of Tony Blair and even an ex US President, I must not say more at this time.

Strangely the little forensic evidence there was in the case, was lost, police bungling reached new heights, and articles found at the scene went missing, and anyone asking questions was hassled and held on mocked up charges. A book has been published which gives most of the story, "Sweet Hills of Blood" and this does not make for good bedtime reading. - But I would recommend it, particularly as the author when asking questions was arrested by police, who searchedhis home for seven hours and took away the black stone doorstep, this is a sign of someone with occult knowledge, and has its ancient psychological origin in "crossing the threshold".

He was told he himself would be charged with the murders and 17 other crimes. Similar crimes to this have been reported not by the British mainstream media, but by the underground press.

Such groups as this have always existed, with tentacles into the higher reaches of politics, the church and Britain's WWII war effort. In 1996 a case was broken open at Tilbury docks, and bush meat parts from an Africa war zone were intercepted en route, these included parts of women's sexual anatomy. This particular ceremony is demonic, and demands a particular mindframe that is not normal.

Many rough sleepers and children who went missing in the past, have ended their days with groups such as this, the recent Dutch paedophile case where two children were said to be used for the cream of society in their debauchery, has similarities here. Witness evidence, victims and survivor statements also tell of similar groups who often use the occult as a cover for plain criminality.

http://newsblaze.com/story/200701010712 ... nions.html
 

LaurenChurchill

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Not to cheapen the tragedy but does anyone else think that Stefano Mele looks eerily like Dr Spock?
 

OldTimeRadio

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"The Monster of Florence" has such a mediaeval sound to it.

"During the exceptionally bitter winter of 1338-1339 AD, Northern Italy experienced...."
 

OldTimeRadio

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LaurenChurchill said:
Not to cheapen the tragedy but does anyone else think that Stefano Mele looks eerily like Dr Spock?

A little bit. But he also looks a little like the pre-presidential (beardless) Abraham Lincoln.

Forgive me, Abe.
 

EnolaGaia

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The source link to The Telegraph is dead, and the content hasn't been archived at the Wayback Machine.

Here's the salvaged text of the second cited webpage ...

The "Monster of Florence": Italy's Unsolved Serial Murders
by David Lohr

The Mystery Begins
The mystery of the “Monster of Florence” began in August 1968 with the murder of Barbara Locci, a 32-year-old married woman from Lastra a Signa, and her lover Antonio Lo Bianco. Even though Barbara was married and had a child, she was known around town as a promiscuous woman, and had previously earned the nickname "Queen Bee".

On the evening of Aug. 21, 1968, Barbara, her young son, and Antonio were returning from a movie theater when Antonio suggested that they stop at a nearby cemetery for a quick sexual liaison. Since her son was fast asleep in the backseat, Barbara agreed without hesitation. Their fun was short lived. As Antonio began removing Barbara’s clothes, a dark figure appeared out of the dark and shot them both dead. Following the double murder, the killer grabbed Barbara’s son out of the car and carried him away.

Sometime later that night, a local farmer was awakened by a knock on his front door. When the man opened the door, the young boy was standing there with tears running down his face. "My mother and my ‘uncle’ are dead," the child told the man. Apparently not wanting to harm the young boy, the killer had left him on the farmer’s front steps. The farmer immediately notified the police.

As investigators went over the cemetery crime scene, they discovered eight .22-caliber shell casings by the vehicle. The car was a white Alfa Romeo "Giulietta" with license plates from the Province of Arezzo. A check of the vehicle’s registration revealed that it belonged to Antonio Lo Bianco. Investigators were initially stumped. Who had committed this heinous crime and why?

Stefano Mele

Between six and seven in the morning, a police patrol car reached the home of Stefano Mele, Barbara's husband. As investigators made their way to Mele’s front door, it abruptly opened, and he stepped out with a suitcase, appearing to be in a hurry. When he had little reaction to the news of his wife’s murder, investigators’ suspicions increased. Mele hesitantly agreed to talk with investigators and accompanied them to police headquarters.

At the stationhouse, Mele told investigators that he had not felt well since the afternoon of the previous day, and had stayed at home, during which time two people had come to visit him, Carmelo Cutrona and Antonio Lo Bianco, both of whom had been his wife's lovers. During the questioning, Mele also mentioned Francesco Vinci, another lover of his wife. Vinci had been arrested in November 1967 following an accusation of adultery by his own wife. As soon as Vinci was released from prison, he resumed the relationship with his lover. Barbara had been the lover of all three Vinci brothers -- Giovanni, Salvatore and Francesco. Investigators decided to investigate some of Mele allegations, and he was asked to return the following day.

SALVAGED FROM: https://web.archive.org/web/2002100..._killers/predators/monster_florence/index.htm

index.php

 

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I would highly recommend Preston and Spezi's The Monster of Florence - which I referenced way back on the Meredith Kercher thread here.

Mignini, the prosecutor involved in both cases, is an absolute peach.

To quote myself:

..a manipulative, egoistic, conspiracy obsessed idiot who has been under indictment himself on several counts, and has a history of bullying and intimidating witnesses, journalists and anyone else who criticises his conduct, as well as burying evidence that doesn't suit his theories. (Mignini hid a witness statment which indicated that a 'murder' which was an essential part of one of his grand conspiracy theories was not in fact a murder at all, but either suicide or accident.) With regards to his handling of the Monster of Florence case the Florentine public minister said Mignini had "fallen prey to a kind of delerium" and would go to "any extreme in defending himself from those who would criticize his investigation"...

When Mario Spezi questioned his handling of MOF related investigations, Mignini had him arrested for obstruction - and ultimately accused him of being actively involved in the killings.

It would have been a complex and intriguing case in anyone's book - however, the story also serves to illustrate how a single uncontrolled ego (certainly in a legal system where prosecutors are embedded within the investigation process) can royally fuck things up for the victims and their families.
 
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