The Mysterious Case Of Elisa Lam

EnolaGaia

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Thanks for the clarification.
 

dream_decoder

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Being a psychic i tune into events and occasionally missing people etc. Last night i had a dream that i think that i received some info relating to this case. It not much but it's something. I found myself in a room alone and heard someone at the door. There had been a parcel put through my door and when i opened the door there were 3 ladies. I knew them but we seemed estranged. The next scene had me standing on some type of platform looking down at water. There was a great sense of fear and it was like i was scared of someone and he was urging me to jump. I did but something else went in with me. Also i saw a hand and it was covered in heavy gold rings. It was quite a big hand and it wasn't white. when i got up this morning i noticed that someone had posted this case. My clues are similar i think and the hand clue is an extra. This is the raw vision.
I'm getting the word...
 

stu neville

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OK- when I ask which colour, I mean specifically which skin tone? "Coloured" is too vague (and in addition no longer considered an acceptable epithet.)
 

Mr. Banooka

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For some reason this story breaks my heart. I find it so sad. I don’t know why it resonates so much. I just wish that people would let the whole paranormal slant go, and treat it as the tragedy it likely was. The most likely thing being the poor girl had a psychotic breakdown of some kind that led to her accidental death.

I first heard about Eliza’s story on The Parapod, where Ian cut Barry short and wouldn’t be drawn in. That prompted me to do some reading about Eliza and ended up in agreement with many, that it was just a tragic accident.

The first season of How To Get Away With Murder has a girl being found in a water tank in much the same way, the difference being the girl was murdered. Whilst I found the show riveting, that bit made me feel extremely uncomfortable.
 

skinny

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https://www.lexico.com/definition/coloured

Meaning of coloured in English:
coloured
(US colored)
Pronunciation /ˈkʌləd/
adjective


  • 1Having a colour or colours, especially as opposed to being black, white, or neutral.
    ‘strings of coloured lights’
  1. 1.1Imbued with an emotive or exaggerated quality
    ‘ highly coloured examples were used by both sides’

    2. (also Coloured)
dated, offensive Wholly or partly of non-white descent.
  • 3. South African Used as an ethnic label for people of mixed ethnic origin, including Khoisan, African, Malay, Chinese, and white.
noun

  • 1
    (also Coloured)
    dated, offensive A person who is wholly or partly of non-white descent.

  • 2South African A person of mixed descent usually speaking Afrikaans or English as their mother tongue.
    ‘the ANC was not making much progress among Indians or mixed-race Coloureds’

  • 3colouredsClothes, sheets, etc. that are any colour but white.
    ‘she wouldn't mix her whites with her coloureds on wash day’
Usage
Coloured referring to skin colour is first recorded in the early 17th century and was adopted in the US by emancipated slaves as a term of racial pride after the end of the American Civil War. In the US and Britain it was the accepted term until the 1960s, when it was superseded by black. The term coloured lost favour among black people during this period and is now widely regarded as offensive except in historical contexts and in particular as part of the name of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). In South Africa the term coloured (also written Coloured) has a different history. It is used to refer to people of mixed-race parentage rather than, as elsewhere, to refer to African peoples and their descendants (i.e. as a synonym for black). Under apartheid it was imposed as an official racial designation. However, in modern use the term is not generally considered offensive or derogatory
 

Sgt Girth

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It can be quite difficult to keep up to date with what terminology is acceptable or considered to be offensive!
 

maximus otter

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It can be quite difficult to keep up to date with what terminology is acceptable or considered to be offensive!
[JOKE]I find that attitude offensive! You need to devote more time to assuaging others' sensibilities![/JOKE]

maximus otter
 

supernova

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For some reason this story breaks my heart. I find it so sad. I don’t know why it resonates so much. I just wish that people would let the whole paranormal slant go, and treat it as the tragedy it likely was. The most likely thing being the poor girl had a psychotic breakdown of some kind that led to her accidental death.

I first heard about Eliza’s story on The Parapod, where Ian cut Barry short and wouldn’t be drawn in. That prompted me to do some reading about Eliza and ended up in agreement with many, that it was just a tragic accident.

The first season of How To Get Away With Murder has a girl being found in a water tank in much the same way, the difference being the girl was murdered. Whilst I found the show riveting, that bit made me feel extremely uncomfortable.
You could be very well right in this case being a tragic accident but she was fearful of something.
 

supernova

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I was wondering what people thought how she entered the water. In my vision she jumped in. To me it seems the most logical thing to do. Inching in bit by bit for me wouldn’t be the preferred method.
 

catseye

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I think, whilst having a psychotic break, anything can be scary or seen to be 'carrying messages'. She could have been scared by aircraft, people passing by too close, music, she may even have been 'hearing voices' with frightening messages.

What she was frightened of doesn't have to have been anything in the outside world, or necessarily sinister - except to her.
 

escargot

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I think, whilst having a psychotic break, anything can be scary or seen to be 'carrying messages'. She could have been scared by aircraft, people passing by too close, music, she may even have been 'hearing voices' with frightening messages.

What she was frightened of doesn't have to have been anything in the outside world, or necessarily sinister - except to her.
Exactly what I'd have said, only you put it better.
 

AnonyJoolz

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I used to work in the mental health field, and make no mistake - mental illness kills people.

It's not rare either, some conditions have about 20% or higher fatality rate from suicide, misadventure or premature death from side-effects of the medication or a lifestyle ruled by the illness. That's higher than some cancers, but without the pathos or 'go fund me' pages.

Mental illness killed Elisa Lam far too young and it's desperately sad.

(edited to add context)
 
Last edited:

AnonyJoolz

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Thanks, @AnonyJoolz for saying that. Mental illness is many times more believable than psychic powers conspiracies as an issue that kills people. It's a shame it needs to be said, but there we go.
Thank you for your thank you!

Elisa may have been murdered, as a result of her illness nullifying her judgement regarding other people; or she may have fallen; or jumped into the water tank in a delusional state or any such combination of the above but the plain truth is she would not have died if was not suffering from an obviously distressing mental illness. I find this much more horrifying and disturbing than the 'wooo' factor.
 

catseye

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Thanks, @AnonyJoolz for saying that. Mental illness is many times more believable than psychic powers conspiracies as an issue that kills people. It's a shame it needs to be said, but there we go.
Sometimes those who have not had 'up close and personal' encounters with mental illnesses which cause psychotic breaks, hallucinations and random behaviours, can fail to fully understand the degree with which it can affect someone's thinking processes. I think this is what causes them to believe the 'woo' explanations. I also think it's part of the 'possession' explanation - somehow it's easier to believe that demons have infested a person than to believe that it's their own brain causing behaviours.
 

PeteS

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Sometimes those who have not had 'up close and personal' encounters with mental illnesses which cause psychotic breaks, hallucinations and random behaviours, can fail to fully understand the degree with which it can affect someone's thinking processes. I think this is what causes them to believe the 'woo' explanations. I also think it's part of the 'possession' explanation - somehow it's easier to believe that demons have infested a person than to believe that it's their own brain causing behaviours.
It's not just mental illness either. I've known extremely sensible level headed people have hallucinations and strange behaviours etc under the influence of prescribed medication or infections. Something relatively simple such as a urinary tract infection can cause this apparently.
 

escargot

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It's not just mental illness either. I've known extremely sensible level headed people have hallucinations and strange behaviours etc under the influence of prescribed medication or infections. Something relatively simple such as a urinary tract infection can cause this apparently
True. This can happen with elderly people for various reasons, including not drinking enough clear fluids. This is very bad for the kidneys and urinary tract.

Older people who've had strokes or with mild dementia might lose their thirst, strangely enough. In care homes they are encouraged to drink squash and water on top of the frequent tea and coffee rounds to help with this.

Neither Techy or his elderly mother are thirsty people.
This puzzles me as I'm swigging water, juice, tonic, squash and pop all day and if I don't I soon know about it. :eek:
 

bugmum

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Something relatively simple such as a urinary tract infection can cause this apparently.
Yep, UTIs can definitely induce hallucinations or signs of mental disorder. The In-House GP occasionally comes home and tells me about another elderly patient who is going senile, just needs course of antibiotics.

Speaking from personal experience, UTIs also lead to extreme crankiness!
 

PeteS

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Yep, UTIs can definitely induce hallucinations or signs of mental disorder. The In-House GP occasionally comes home and tells me about another elderly patient who is going senile, just needs course of antibiotics.

Speaking from personal experience, UTIs also lead to extreme crankiness!
IH GP sounds on the ball. Is he any good at psychic diagnosis ? I've got this bad knee you see...….
 
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