The Optical Illusions Thread

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You are probably all aware that the band OK GO like elaborate music videos. Check out the one called The Writing's On The Wall for some optical trickery.
 
It starts to fade very quickly but then the colours intensify if anything. Tried with each eye and both eyes.

Aaaarghhh! I must have Non Troxler's fading :pop: :willy:
Yes, this works very quickly and effectively, but you've got to avoid the eye twitching bit to keep the effect alive. o_O
 
Aaaaarghhhh! I've got uncontrolable eye twitching. :willy: :pop::crazy::worry:
 
There's a Wikipedia entry with an example and that works for me but this one doesn't. The colours are slightly different so perhaps that has some bearing on whether you see the effect or not.
 
There's a Wikipedia entry with an example and that works for me but this one doesn't. The colours are slightly different so perhaps that has some bearing on whether you see the effect or not.
Whew! That one works. :)
 
Perhaps it is not having the central cross to focus on so my gaze starts to wander?
 
There's a Wikipedia entry with an example and that works for me but this one doesn't. The colours are slightly different so perhaps that has some bearing on whether you see the effect or not.
Thanks for that idea. The Wiki one works for me and the one posted here doesn't. I got the same effect of the colours, esp. yellow becoming brighter as mentioned by @Tunn11. The one here started to look like an image of two people side by side.
 
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The Stefaneschi Triptych, painted by Giotto in the early 14th century, is thought to be the earliest example of the Droste effect.

At first glance, it seems like a fairly standard medieval Triptych, designed to stand on a church altar:

tryp1.png


But look closely at the kneeling figure, offering something to St Peter.
He is offering the very Triptych on which he is painted!
On it there can (just) be seen a tiny representation of the figure offering the Triptych, on which.....

tryp2.png


I do like a nice Droste effect (named after a Dutch brand of cocoa from 1904) and it's amazing to think of Giotto having fun with such mind-bending recursive imagery some 700 years ago.

droste.png
 
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