The Ourang Medan Mystery (Derelict Ship / Dead Crew)

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Anonymous

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if we're mentioning derelicts how about the Ourang Medan? well spooky
 
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Anonymous

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A Dutch freighter found adrift in the Indian Ocean with a crew of stiffs wearing thoroughly unpleasant facial expressions.
 

soaringspirit

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the Ourang Medan story is pretty fascinating...looked for a link to the story ...most are not in english..this is one that is ..and the author even provides an explanation for the mystery, albiet an unproven one. Should also note that it seems to have been grabbed from FT.

neswa.org.au/Library/Articles/A cargo of death.htm

This link is dead. See later post for updated access to the MIA article.
 
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A

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I suppose the rictus could also be explained by strychnine poisoning? Or even tetanus/lock-jaw perhaps?

Just a thought.
 

hunck

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Some are a bit boring, some are probably rubbish, but some seem interesting. I'm rather interested in the weird balls being dug up, the human figure that seems too old and the ghost ships message. http://www.viralnova.com/weird-history/
The ship one is fictitious as well. There is no record of a ship of that name anywhere.
 
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rynner2

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The ship one is fictitious as well. There is no record of a ship of that name anywhere.
It's all over the internet, even on Wiki! Admittedly most accounts take the story with a pinch of salt.

But this account is interesting, and possibly gathers up a few loose ends:

What really happened to the SS Ourang Medan? Over the decades several marine historians have sought to uncover the truth about the ship’s puzzling fate. Among these, Roy Bainton’s research stands out. He writes:

“Searching the Dutch Shipping records in Amsterdam seemed only to deepen the mystery. There was no mention of the ship at all, and my enquiries to the Maritime Authority in Singapore drew a blank.

“What follows is pure speculation, but there is a tantalising, possible explanation as to her crew's demise and her disappearance from the records. A fellow researcher, Otto Mielke mentions a mixed, lethal cargo on the Ourang Medan 'Zyankali' (potassium cyanide) and nitro-glycerine. How this mixture could have gone unrecorded is a mystery, as the controls on such lethal cargoes, even 50 years ago, would have ensured reams of paperwork.”

Unit 731 was a secret research and development department within the Imperial Japanese Army that was dedicated to biological and chemical warfare. They used human beings as part of their experimentation during the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War II and thus were responsible for some of the most notorious war crimes carried out by Japanese personnel. Unit 731’s research methods were unremittingly appalling. However, after the war ended, Douglas MacArthur (the then the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers) secretly granted immunity to many of Unit 731’s personnel in exchange for providing The United States with their biological warfare research. Shiro Ishii, the department’s head moved to Maryland to work on bio-weapons research. Bainton continues:

“So how was this deadly cargo moved around the South China Sea and through the Straits of Malacca during this troubled period? Not by air; the prospect of a cargo plane crashing with several tons of deadly gas on board was too horrendous to consider. No, you hired an insignificant old tramp steamer, preferably with a low paid foreign crew, stowed the cargo in disguised oil drums and, like all serious smugglers, hoped for the best, and a blind eye from authority. If we accept, due to the nature of her crew's deaths, that she was carrying deadly gas or chemicals and if indeed she was a Dutch vessel had this news broken it would have been a major embarrassment for any government involved, especially in the light of the Geneva Convention. Hence the dead ends faced by any researcher. The story exists because, like the gases, it escaped.”

As with many of these mysteries, it is unlikely that the truth will be uncovered and for now at least, the Ourang Medan remains a dark tale to tell on stormy nights.


http://theunexplainedmysteries.com/SS-Ourang-Medan-Ghost-Ship.html

So it could have been a classic conspiracy to cover up an illegal post-war operation... We may never know.

EDITED to remove superfluous word.
 
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EnolaGaia

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the Ourang Medan story is pretty fascinating...looked for a link to the story ...most are not in english..this is one that is ..and the author even provides an explanation for the mystery, albiet an unproven one. Should also note that it seems to have been grabbed from FT.
neswa.org.au/Library/Articles/A cargo of death.htm

The MIA webpage can be accessed via the Wayback Machine at:

https://web.archive.org/web/20061210153411/http://www.neswa.org.au/Library/Articles/A cargo of death.htm

Here's the introductory section ...
This is from the September 1999 issue of Fortean Times Page 28. Fortean Times is a popular 'slick' in Britain dealing with the odd and unexpected. It contains some new data. (Connection with Unit 731)

CARGO OF DEATH
In 1948, a Dutch freighter was found drifting near Indonesia. Its crew all dead in postures of terror or agony.
Marine historian Roy Bainton investigates, and uncovers hints of the sinister collusion of post--World War II governments.


TEETH BARED, AND STARING.

This strange yarn began as an obscure, bizarre footnote in nautical history. The story of the Orang Medan was one of those chilling fo'c'sle tales told by old hands over a few beers on long crossings of the Pacific or the Atlantic.
We've all heard the ghostly fable of the Mary Celeste; like many similar stories, a modicum of determined digging can usually strip away the romance and often leave us with the bare, demystified facts.
Not so with the Orang Medan. The more one digs, the more fragments, hints and nuances appear. This is a story with a secret; a secret buried somewhere in the guarded records of maritime officialdom. Turn down the lamp, cue the creepy music...
In February 1948 (or June 1947, depending on which source one consults) a series of distress calls were sent out by the Dutch freighter Orang Medan in the Straits of Malacca between Sumatra and Indonesia.
"All officers including captain dead, lying in chartroom and on bridge, probably whole crew dead... " This chilling message, accompanied by a spate of desperate SOS calls, was followed by indecipherable Morse code... then a final message just two stark words "I die."
Boarding parties found the dead radio operator, his hand on the Morse key, eyes wide open. The entire crew even the ship's dog were discovered in the same terrified posture, all dead.
According to a frequently mentioned document (which I have so far been unable to trace) called The Proceedings of the Merchant Marine Council, the crew were found "teeth bared, with their upturned faces to the sun, staring, as if in fear..."
Following this grim discovery, a fire broke out in the ship's hold.
The boarding parties were forced to abandon her. Shortly after, a violent explosion described in some accounts as so violent the vessel "lifted herself from the water" and she quickly sank.
So, there you have it. It's a great yarn; but is it just an old seadog's tale? Or perhaps, as some have suggested, a 50-year old April Fool joke, composed by some bored tabloid hack? ...
 

EnolaGaia

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The Wikipedia entry on the Ourang Medan story:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ourang_Medan

... provides a basic overview of the story of this story and links to accounts that do little to resolve the mystery within the story or the mystery of the story itself.
 

Spookdaddy

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Has anyone ever ascertained whether the two other ships mentioned in the Wiki entry (the Silver star and the City of Baltimore) actually existed, and, if so, were in the area at the time - and what, if anything, their logs said about the incident?

Expunging one unmanned vessel from the records is a proposition I can just about entertain. Disappearing three, two with full - and live - crews, I find a bit more difficult.

(But, yes - it is a great story.)
 

maximus otter

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What morse operator would send the words “I die”, as he was dying? It’s reminiscent of the scene in Monty Python and the Holy Grail where the agonal Joseph of Arimathea is supposed to have carved Aaaaaargh! into the stone as he croaked.

The Proceedings of the Merchant Marine Council are quoted. As that body still exists - as the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety and Security Council - surely it would be a trivial matter to take a volume from a shelf in their library and either shoot this tale down, or provide invaluable confirmation.

maximus otter
 

marhawkman

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What morse operator would send the words “I die”, as he was dying? It’s reminiscent of the scene in Monty Python and the Holy Grail where the agonal Joseph of Arimathea is supposed to have carved Aaaaaargh! into the stone as he croaked.
I think the idea is that the radioman was signaling to whoever was listening that he'd be unable to reply. It's a super-dramatic way to do it, but given the context isn't completely ridiculous.
The Proceedings of the Merchant Marine Council are quoted. As that body still exists - as the U.S. Coast Guard Marine Safety and Security Council - surely it would be a trivial matter to take a volume from a shelf in their library and either shoot this tale down, or provide invaluable confirmation.

maximus otter
Actually that work is non-authoritative.... all it really does is mention that they'd heard of it.

I like the Skittish library page about it. http://skittishlibrary.co.uk/the-myth-of-the-ourang-medan-ghost-ship-1940/

It's probably fiction sold to newspapers who couldn't fact check it. It's not as obvious when it's a single story, but multiple similar stories with different dates and locations but the same ship named Ourang Medan???

The only rub is that Otto Mielke allegedly interviewed the crew of Silver Star to get more information, then published a 32-page book about it. But, I'm not sure if Mr. Mielke's work is fiction or not. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Mielke The German Wikipedia bio indicates most of his work was fiction, and I'm not sure any of it was actually researched even if it wasn't fully fiction.
 

EnolaGaia

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Mielke's account first appeared as an article in the first issue of Seefahrt In Aller Welt - a periodical publishing maritime adventure stories.
Anchor booklets. Seefahrt around the world was a West German magazine novel series , which appeared from 1954 to 1959 in 95 editions in Munich's Arthur Moewig-Verlag . The publisher was the former officer of the Imperial Navy Corvette Captain a. D. Fritz-Otto Busch . Parallel to the series, the series SOS - Fates of German Ships was published by the same publisher from 1953. In contrast to SOS, the anchor issues mostly dealt with dramatic events in Anglo-American maritime history.

Google Translation of the German Wikipedia article:
https://translate.google.com/transl...ker-Hefte._Seefahrt_in_aller_Welt&prev=search

Here's the cover:

https://www.de173.com/timeline/das-totenschiffin-der-sudsee-published/
 

EnolaGaia

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Mielke's source for the story was a February 1948 article in a Dutch East Indies newspaper.

Een Mysterie van de Zee. ( Dutch : A secret of the sea. )

De locomotief: Samarangsch trade-en advertentie-blad of February 3, 1948, a daily newspaper of the Dutch East Indian port city of Semarang

An image of this published article can be accessed at:

https://imageviewer.kb.nl/ImagingService/imagingService?1584099620941&id=ddd:010862872:mpeg21:p003:image

This article states the incident occurred in June 1947 near the Marshall Islands, not the Straits of Malacca. No name is given for the ship that allegedly discovered the Ourang Medan (responding to the SOS or not ... ). No explanation is given for the photographs published with this article, and one of them was pretty obviously copied from an earlier French version of the story.

The February 1948 publication date for this article is almost certainly the origin of later claims the incident occurred in February 1948.
 
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EnolaGaia

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As marhawkman has noted, there are 2 British newspaper sources for this story dating back to 1940.

This earlier date precludes the Silver Star as the vessel responding to the SOS.

This guest post at Bermuda Triangle Central:

http://bermudatrianglecentral.blogspot.com/2013/11/ourang-medan.html

... adds more counter-evidence to the myth. The author located a pair of French newspaper articles that reflect the alternative facts presented in the British articles. These French articles were published later (December 1940; September 1941), and they specify the date of the incident as November 13, 1939.

Yet, through a simple search on eBay, I found a copy of the Vichy French magazine Sept-Jours (#45, September 7, 1941) that had the more or less complete story of the Ourang Medan in it (p. 9, "Après Vingt Mois — Le Mystère de l' 'Ourang-Medan' Est Éclairci," i.e., "After Twenty Months, the Mystery of the Ourang Medan Is Solved"). It predates the earliest commonly known version by eleven years.

This article, in turn, refers to an earlier article on the Ourang Medan in an earlier issue of the same magazine (#13, December 29, 1940). According to Sept-Jours, the Ourang Medan incident took place on November 13, 1939, predating the earliest traditional date for the incident by about eight years. ...

I found me a copy of the December 29, 1940, issue of Sept-Jours with the original account of the Ourang Medan yarn (p. 6, "Le Premier Récit d'un Grand Mystère de la Mer," i.e., "The First Account of a Great Sea Mystery") ...

The French articles seem to locate the incident near the Solomon Islands rather than the Marshalls.

In any case, I think it's safe to conclude:

- Allegations of the incident having occurred after 1940 are bogus.
- The later (1947 and onward ... ) versions of the story are clearly borrowed from an earlier source.
- This earlier source dates back to at least as early as 1940, and the incident itself allegedly dates back to 1939 (at least).
- The basic story may predate even the 1940 British and French articles, for all we know ...
 

marhawkman

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The sale price of Mielke's story was 50 pfennig(half a Deutschmark)? Heh, makes it seem like it was something akin to a comic book.
Mielke's source for the story was a February 1948 article in a Dutch East Indies newspaper.

Een Mysterie van de Zee. ( Dutch : A secret of the sea. )

De locomotief: Samarangsch trade-en advertentie-blad of February 3, 1948, a daily newspaper of the Dutch East Indian port city of Semarang

An image of this published article can be accessed at:

https://imageviewer.kb.nl/ImagingService/imagingService?1584099620941&id=ddd:010862872:mpeg21:p003:image

This article states the incident occurred in June 1947 near the Marshall Islands, not the Straits of Malacca. No name is given for the ship that allegedly discovered the Ourang Medan (responding to the SOS or not ... ). No explanation is given for the photographs published with this article, and one of them was pretty obviously copied from an earlier French version of the story.

The February 1948 publication date for this article is almost certainly the origin of later claims the incident occurred in February 1948.
The angle of the picture suggests to me that it was basically a stock photo. It's a badly listing cargo ship that is nearly unrecognizable.

Interesting: https://www.de173.com/the-ss-ourang-medan/
I found a copy of the Vichy French magazine Sept-Jours (#45, September 7, 1941) that had the more or less complete story of the Ourang Medan in it (p. 9, “Après Vingt Mois — Le Mystère de l’ ‘Ourang-Medan’ Est Éclairci,” i.e., “After Twenty Months, the Mystery of the Ourang Medan Is Solved”). This article, in turn, refers to an earlier article on the Ourang Medan in an earlier issue of the same magazine (#13, December 29, 1940). According to Sept-Jours, the Ourang Medan incident took place on November 13, 1939.” ~ Alexander Butziger
This is the same French publication but on a different website.

It also has a proper bio of the "Silver Star".
The rescue ship the Silver Star is another point where most researchers have said it simply did not exist. However it was originally christened “Santa Cecilia” by the Grace Line (W. R. Grace & Co.), and later renamed the “Silver Star” when the United States Maritime Commission “drafted” it in 1946. In 1947 it had been reacquired by the Grace Line shipping company who renamed the vessel the “Santa Juana” till it was scraped in 1971. So, in reality, it was only named the “Silver Star” for a short period. Repeated attempts by researchers to get details from Grace Lines in New York of the Silver Star crew list and logbook had been met with a strange silence.
This is interesting; the ship did not use the name Silver Star in 1948.
There's even a website listing the company that once owned it. http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/grace.shtml
Santa Cecilia (3) (built)1942 (transferred)1946 to United States Maritime Commission renamed Silver Star, 1947 reverted to Grace Line renamed Santa Juana, 1971 scrapped .
It also has a bit explaining why it's futile to try contacting Grace Lines today.
Things were normal until 1969 when the parent company W.R. Grace decided to go out of the steamship business and concentrate on chemical and other company ventures. Grace Line was sold to Prudential Line, a small line owned by Skouras of 20th Century Fox. At first the line was called Prudential Grace Lines and later the Grace was dropped and it became just Prudential Line. The ships were operated as before with most of the same personnel aboard but in 1970 Prudential decided to suspend the Caribbean service and the Santa Rosa and Santa Paula were laid up, never to sail under the American Flag again. The "M" ships were sailed as freighters until 1972 when three were transferred to the west coast. They were once again returned to passenger ship status. They sailed from San Francisco, north to Tacoma and Vancouver thence through the Panama Canal calling at ports on the east coast of South America then through the Strait of Magellan to call at ports on the west coast of South America and thence return to Los Angeles and San Francisco. This was a 59 day voyage. The Santa Magdalena remained on the east coast until 1974 when she too was transferred to the west coast to sail with the other three.
In 1978 the Prudential Line was taken over by Delta Lines, In 1983 there was a sharp drop in cargo bookings to South America and operations began to wind down. The six "L" class freighters were laid up and finally sold. The four "M" ships continued to run until 1984 when all operation of the former Grace Line Santas ceased.
Not only is the company defunct, but it got sold twice before dying for good. Also the Silver Star/Santa Juana was scrapped in 1971. Maybe there's a storage container somewhere with the old papers in it, but good luck finding it.
 
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marhawkman

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Ok, soo... What factual basis is there for the original version?

I don't have a copy of "Sept-Jours (#45, September 7, 1941)" So I'll have to rely on what
https://bermudatrianglecentral.blogspot.com/2013/11/ourang-medan.html
says about it.

One thing that caught my notice... "Vichy France" This means German occupied France during WW2. If the original story was in a Vichy France newspaper it might have been "fake news" created as a propaganda piece. This might actually explain the name. One thing people have noted is that Orang Medan is grammatically incorrect and Ourang Medan is spelled wrong. Both of which are mistakes that could be made by a person who is using a Malay-French dictionary to make up a ship name.

But this analysis notes that the original story calls the Ourang Medan infamous, IE it was publicly known for piracy. So it's NOT some ship no one had seen or heard from and even gives it's HISTORY.... none of which can be matched to anything. I mean, allegedly the Ourang Medan was AUSTRALIAN and SOLD to pirates. The explanation is semi-plausible. Non-military ship owned by the govt that is old and a clunker. But why would the AUSTRALIANS name it that?

Then there's this:
The American warship is identified as "torpilleur américain No. 716." That doesn't seem to make sense.
...
What's more, referring to a destroyer only by her number instead of by her name strikes me as rather un-American. It is, however, a typically German thing to do. The Germans never built many destroyers, and those they had often had no names, only numbers, and even those that had names were frequently referred to by their numbers only. This would appear to support my theory below that the hoaxer was a German.
I'd come to the conclusion that the 7 Days version was a propaganda piece BEFORE getting to this. But yeah... it's an interesting tidbit.

In fairness that naming convention did get used with PT boats. But PT boats were tiny things.

The speculation that it might have been Mielke himself who wrote the original is interesting. We was at one time in the German Navy, but in WW2 he was working as a war correspondent. The German Wikipedia lists his birth as 1906, so he'd have been in his 30s. Also the nature of writing is more similar. Both the 1941 version and Mielke's version are short story length treatments. The Locomotive version is a short cliff note version with weird details. Mielke seems to have merged the 7 Days version with the Locomotive version when writing the version published in 1954.

OK, time line time again...

Yorkshire Evening Post, 21st November 1940:
The Daily Mirror, 22nd November 1940:
Both of these are extremely short. The near-simultaneous publishing dates could be the result of the writer selling the story to multiple newspapers at the same time. But this is interesting because it also claims the story came from the Associated Press. Did the writer sell it to the AP then the AP forward it out? Who wrote it? There is one critical detail that differentiates them. The Daily Mirror claims Ourang Medan burst into flames and sank the NEXT DAY. Yorkshire Post doesn't say when it sank, but that's the main difference there. Both talk about multiple small explosions happening while the ship burned.

Sept-Jours publishes articles about it in Dec1940 and Sept1941. (possibly Nazi propaganda, maybe written by Mielke, maybe not)

3Feb1948 De Locomotief publishes a version attributed to "Silvio Scherli" that's longer than the Post and Mirror, but shorter than 7 Days. This version is the one that adds in the details about horrifying death stares and stuff. It apparently uses copies of the pictures in 7 Days.

Proceedings of the Merchant Marine Council, May 9, 1952, pp. 107–110 mentions the story, but doesn't really say much about it.

Dampfer Ourang Medan – Das Totenschiff in der Südsee is published in 1954 by Otto Mielke. This version seems to merge the Locomotive and 7 Days versions, but mangle the details.

Skittish Library adds: "The original narrator Silvio Scherli also apparently wrote a report on it for the Trieste “Export Trade” publication of September 28, 1959."

Ok... so who is the originator? Some people think Scherli is the one who wrote the AP version. The evidence there is that it mentions an origin in Trieste(Italy) which the Locomotive reports as the location Scherli lives. It's not fully compelling but thought provoking.

This is weird... it's like a pre-internet creepy pasta... there's DEFINITELY more than one author, and multiple languages(English, French, Dutch, German) it was written in.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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The letter to the CIA has been made available thanks to the FOI act, but it's unclear whether this was internal CIA correspondence, as this website suggests, or an interested civvie trying to get answers out of the CIA.
The following looks like a follow-up letter, chasing earlier correspondence from 1956. I can find no evidence whether C.H Marck Jr. ever received a response.

cia.png


https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/ghost-ships-spooky-sos-call-14007356
 

marhawkman

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The letter to the CIA has been made available thanks to the FOI act, but it's unclear whether this was internal CIA correspondence, as this website suggests, or an interested civvie trying to get answers out of the CIA.
The following looks like a follow-up letter, chasing earlier correspondence from 1956. I can find no evidence whether C.H Marck Jr. ever received a response.

View attachment 52012

https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/ghost-ships-spooky-sos-call-14007356
While interesting, it's not a source of information. It's apparently nothing more than a guy using official channels to discuss a rumor he heard. :/

The fact it's marked TS ("Top Secret") is interesting though.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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While interesting, it's not a source of information. It's apparently nothing more than a guy using official channels to discuss a rumor he heard. :/

The fact it's marked TS ("Top Secret") is interesting though.

Indeed and whilst I tend to go along with the FT's debunking of the incident, the fact that the CIA saw fit to classify the correspondence is interesting.
 

marhawkman

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Indeed and whilst I tend to go along with the FT's debunking of the incident, the fact that the CIA saw fit to classify the correspondence is interesting.
The question is "why"? Legend has it that a lot of stuff is classified for no reason other than whoever wrote it doesn't wanna talk about it later.
 

maximus otter

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The American warship is identified as "torpilleur américain No. 716." That doesn't seem to make sense.
...
What's more, referring to a destroyer only by her number instead of by her name strikes me as rather un-American.

Quite the opposite: "torpilleur américain" translates as "American torpedo boat". There was just such a vessel: Motor Torpedo Boat PT-716.

It had zero career in the US Navy, having been completed less than a week before WWII ended. It was sold to Cuba sometime after July 1946. Its ultimate fate is unknown.

Here's what it would have looked like:

iu


Technical specs.

maximus otter

 

marhawkman

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Quite the opposite: "torpilleur américain" translates as "American torpedo boat". There was just such a vessel: Motor Torpedo Boat PT-716.

It had zero career in the US Navy, having been completed less than a week before WWII ended. It was sold to Cuba sometime after July 1946. Its ultimate fate is unknown.

Here's what it would have looked like:

iu


Technical specs.

maximus otter
>_<' You're quoting the source I was discussing... and not what I said.... Yes, that's a PT boat(or the British equivalent anyways)... which I was discussing in the post.

Here's the rest of the part that I omitted with "...":
The American warship is identified as "torpilleur américain No. 716." That doesn't seem to make sense. The US Navy never had so many torpedo boats that one would be numbered 716. The destroyer DD-716, the USS Wiltsie, wasn't laid down before 1945. The USS Balduck was briefly classified as DE-716, but even she wasn't laid down before 1944. There was a submarine chaser USS SC-716, but the boats of her class were built between 1941 and 1944, again far too late to be afloat and cruising in 1939. Unless there's another Navy numbering scheme I'm unaware of, this ship appears to be pure fiction.
While I can't verify this, if true it means the 716 hull number is impossible. Also noteworthy, this story went around in the early 40s. This is the time period BEFORE PT boats were mass-produced. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PT_boat

So... what was that source even talking about? Yeah... the phrase "torpilleur américain No. 716." makes sense as an alternate way to say "PT-716".... but not in 1939 or 1940. Also, that link you provided is a Vosper 70... that's a British Royal Navy craft. OOH this is useful! Check out the production dates on this page: https://www.uboat.net/allies/warships/types.html?type=Motor+torpedo+boat
It lists the various models/numbers of PT boats and when they were built. It's not that PT boats didn't exist... it's that the number of them in 1940.... was 2 digits. The hull number 716 makes no sense. Yes, as you noted there WAS a PT-716. But what you didn't notice:
Laid down 6 June 1945 by Annapolis Yacht Yard, Inc., Annapolis, MD
  • Launched 17 July 1945
  • Completed 2 August 1945
It wasn't even built until years later. But that quote about "torpilleur américain No. 716." that source(29dec1940) claims the incident was 17nov1939. The dates just don't line up. Whatever that Sept-Jours article was talking about, it couldn't have been a PT boat.
 

maximus otter

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The Kriegsmarine apparently tended to name large vessels and number smaller ones. They had a Z16, the Friedrich Eckoldt. She entered service in August 1938, and was in the Mediterranean in May 1939, then the Baltic immediately after WWII broke out.

She was sunk with all hands by HMS Sheffield on 31.12.42 in the Barents Sea, north of Norway.

maximus otter
 

SimonBurchell

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I just dug out Lost at Sea: Ghost Ships and Other Mysteries by Michael Goss and George Behe, I was surprised to find that the Ourang Medan doesn't even get a mention.
 
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marhawkman

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I just dug out Lost at Sea: Ghost Ships and Other Mysteries by Michael Goss and George Behe, I was surprise to find that the Ourang Medan doesn't even get a mention.
Honestly? other than that one serious mention in 1952? I don't think the case actually got much attention until modern times.
 
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