The Power Of Swearing

Lb8535

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And then there's that horrible moment when you wonder whether you actually vocalised it externally... :D
When I was young and lived in California I took my used Pinto to a firm to have a popup sunroof installed (which they did using a paper pattern and a circular saw - another story.) I had to learn very quickly to stop yelling at the other drivers, because now there was a good chance they were hearing me.
 
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escargot

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We went to watch the Tour de France go through our town - didn't take long, the whole lot were gone and out of sight in about 90 seconds - and my strongest impression was of the riders' colourful language.

As they sped through the bottleneck we heard 'Get outta the way!' 'Fuck off!' 'Piss off yer cunt!' 'Fucking shift!' 'Oi get to fuck!' Fucking wanker!' etc.

Techy says it was banter, just normal sledging, but I dunno. Funny though.
 

EnolaGaia

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The BBC has conducted a survey on swearing behavior and perceived limits to its proliferation - especially with regard to minors.
More swearing but parents want children protected

People are increasingly likely to use strong swearing in their everyday life, says research from the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC).

The body, which gives age ratings to films, says about a third of people in the UK are more likely to use strong swear words than five years ago.

But the research found parents did not want age restrictions weakened for swearing in movies and DVDs. ...

The report on swearing habits, based on research with 1,000 people, found about six in 10 people saw strong swearing, such as the F-word, as part of everyday life. ...

A third were more likely to swear than five years ago, but there was a significant "generational divide", with 18 to 34 year olds most likely to swear and to be "desensitised" to its impact.

Among older people, strong swear words still remained a taboo - with 75% of those over 65 saying they would not use strong swearing in public, according to research which included focus groups and in-depth interviews. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.bbc.com/news/education-57419263
 

Spookdaddy

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My experience in workshops and on worksites convinces me that the exclamation OOYABASTAD (abbrev: OOYABAS) is not only one of the most common words in the English language but also clearly contains powerful analgesic properties. These properties are so significant that not only can they be applied to self-administered mishaps (splinters; a misplaced hammer blow; heavy weights falling just the wrong side of steel toe cap etc) but they can also be deployed against injuries in others: It is common to find a sharp intake of breath followed by an OOYABAS(TAD) applied where an individual witnesses injury to other people - and can, in fact, be effective even in response to descriptions of said mishaps by third parties.
 
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