The R.I.P. Thread

MrRING

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#1
Blacula Dead!

William Marshall, the dignified actor who played Blacula, passed away this weekend. He played the character in both Blacula and Scream Blacula, Scream. He also played the Exorcist in the William Girdler trash epic Abby.

Many younger folks might remember him as one of the Kings of Cartoon on Pee-Wee's Playhouse.

Here's the listing from Yahoo:

Stage, TV and screen actor William Marshal dies at 78

LOS ANGELES - Actor William Marshall, who played a variety of roles, from Shakespeare's "Othello" on stage, to "Blacula" in the camp movie classic, has died. He was 78.

Marshall, who suffered in recent years from Alzheimer's disease, died Wednesday in a Los Angeles rest home.

The actor appeared in several dozen films and in popular television series such as "Star Trek" in the 1960s and "The Jeffersons" in the 1980s. But he was in love with theater and taught acting workshops on college campuses and at the Mufandi Institute in Watts. He was director of the institute in the 1960s.

He also brought a number of prominent African American figures to the stage.

He portrayed singer Paul Robeson and the statesman Frederick Douglass, a role he spent 15 years researching. He eventually played the part of the famed abolitionist on television.

Marshall was born in Gary, Ind., and studied acting at the Actors Studio and the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York City after spending several years as an art student at New York University.

Douglass was not the only role that Marshall reprised. He played the Moorish king in "Othello" in Europe and the United States. The London Sunday Times once hailed him as "the best Othello of our time."

Marshall played a different kind of character in the 1972 movie, "Blacula" and its sequel, "Scream, Blacula, Scream!", but he brought the same dignity to the title role of the African prince.

Originally conceived as a dimwitted count, Marshall modeled the character on the original Count Dracula, the tormented Eastern European royal in Bram Stoker's 19th century novel.

Marshall is survived by three sons and one daughter. His life partner of 42 years, Sylvia Jarrico, said a memorial service will be held this summer.
 
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Anonymous

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#4
Oh Baby (Barry White voice)
love to see that movie,
mbye theyll show on Channel 4 now he's dead.
By Blacula By
 

Timble2

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#5
I saw 'Blacula' as the support to 'Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires (Hammer meets Sir Run Run Shaw: Dracula plus kung-fu vs van Helsing), in dodgy fleapit in Rusholme, Manchester, in the 70s, truly they don't make 'em like that any more (or perhaps they go direct to video).
 

KeyserXSoze

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#7
David Hemmings dies.

Blow-Up
Barbarella
Gladiator
Last Orders
Gangs of New York
Profondo Rosso
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Directed and produced the A-Team, Quantum Leap and Airwolf.

:(
 

Timble2

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#8
Keyser Soze said:
David Hemmings dies...

:(
Also played the leads in a TV film of 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde' (1981), was a guest star in 'Northern Exposure' (now that was a Fortean series) and numerous other films and TV programmes.
 
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Anonymous

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#13
Sad News

I don't know if this is relevent to anyone else here, but Cinescape have just announced the sad news that Richard Biggs (Dr Franklin from Babylon 5) has passed away at the age of 43.

http://www.cinescape.com/0/editoria...tion=page&type_id=&cat_id=272956&obj_id=41603

This is indeed sad news. Especially due to the iminent announcement from Joe about the next B5 project.

Condolancies go out to all of Richards friends and family.

Regards

MF
 

KeyserXSoze

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#14
Quorthon Dies

http://www.roadrunnerrecords.com/blabbermouth.net/news.aspx?mode=Article&newsitemID=23453
Founding BATHORY Member: 'QUORTHON Had Much More To Offer' - June 9, 2004

Legendary video director and founding BATHORY member Jonas Åkerlund has spoken to Sweden's Expressen newspaper about the passing of BATHORY mastermind Thomas "Quorthon" Forsberg from what is believed to be heart failure. Forsberg, who was known to have been battling heart problems for years, was found dead in his apartment in Stockholm, Sweden on Monday (June 7). He was 39 years old.

"It's so sad. He had much more to offer," Åkerlund said.

Jonas, who formed the band with Forsberg in the early '80s, went on to have a successful video-directing career, having worked with the likes of METALLICA, PRODIGY, MADONNA and U2.

"[BATHORY came onto the scene] extremely early," Åkerlund said. "People like Marilyn Manson, Billy Corgan and the members of METALLICA have all come up to me and have told me that they listened to BATHORY."

According to Åkerlund, it was Thomas Forsberg's creativity that made the band such an influence on so many younger metal acts.

"[Quorthon] had a high cult status," Jonas said. "He wasn't interested in attention, he just wanted to play his music."
 

MrRING

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#15
Blob Director Dies: Was Making Jordanian Theme Park

'Blob' director, from Malvern, dies in accident
By Lini S. Kadaba

Irvin Shortess "Shorty" Yeaworth Jr., who made more than 400 films on religious and social topics during his career but was perhaps best known for the 1958 sci-fi cult classic The Blob, died Monday in a car accident in Jordan, where he was working on yet another dream. The Malvern resident was 78. Mr. Yeaworth, known to all as Shorty from his middle name, was traveling from Aqaba to Amman when his vehicle went off the road near Petra.

"We think he fell asleep," Jean Bruce Yeaworth, his wife of 59 years, said yesterday about the accident.He was nearing the end of several years of work to build a major entertainment complex in Jordan called Jordanian Experience at the Aqaba Gateway. It was described by his family as a state-of-the-art magic carpet flight through Jordan, featuring a multimedia, multisensory look at the region's history, in the style of Disney World, with artifacts, eateries and even moving seats.

It was to open next month. Jean Yeaworth said the family would complete the project."He felt like he was waiting his whole life for this," his wife said. Deeply religious, Mr. Yeaworth, the son of a Presbyterian pastor, led tours to the Middle East over 25 years, hoping to bring attention to Biblical sites in Jordan, "the other side of the Jordan River," his wife said.

At the same time, he hoped to act as a "go-between" for Arabs and Israelis. "He felt there should be a center where they could get acquainted in a fun way," Jean Yeaworth said. The Jordan Times quoted colleagues at the Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority, where he worked, as saying Mr. Yeaworth may have been an American, "but we all sensed one way or another that a part of him must be Jordanian."

His work in Jordan was surely one legacy. Another, no doubt, was The Blob. He had a love-hate relationship with the horror flick made in his backyard of Chester County. "He was not very proud of it," his wife said. Last week, the BlobFest tribute to the movie was held at the Colonial Theatre in Phoenixville, where the scene of moviegoers screaming and fleeing the oozing, red menace was shot. Jean Yeaworth recalled her husband saying at the time that "The Blob is going to follow me to the grave."

"And it has," she added.

The movie was an experiment for the Good News Productions, which later became Valley Forge Films. Based in Yellow Springs, Chester County, the company focused on religious fare, hoping to make feature films. The studio complex was sold in the 1970s.

"Our goal, of course, was to make serious film for theatrical release," he told the Associated Press in 1995. "We knew we shouldn't make our first theatrical film on a subject that was precious to us, because we weren't that good." So Mr. Yeaworth agreed to direct The Molten Meteor, the working title for The Blob.

The experiment, of course, worked. Fans continue to celebrate the movie with Web sites, festivals and memorabilia. Mr. Yeaworth was born in Berlin, Germany, where his father was studying. He graduated from West Philadelphia High School in 1943 and studied history and education at Franklin & Marshall College, earning a bachelor's degree in 1947. He also studied at Temple University's School of Theology.

"All his life he was interested in entertainment," his wife said. "He really wanted to make films."He got his start in 1949, when he produced Youth on the March for television.

He was also an accomplished musician and composer, and led the choir at the Church of the Saviour in Wayne during the 1970s and 1980s and was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. He also headed the Wayne Concert Series for 22 years.

His deep Christian faith "was very much the lens through which he viewed life," said Pastor Tom Walsh of the Church of the Saviour. Mr. Yeaworth was a member of the Great Valley Presbyterian Church in Malvern and the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by his five children, Katherine Whittle, Irvin S. 3d, David, Deborah Tobin and Jonathan; a brother, David; two sisters, Betty Jean Craig and Margaret Stoll; 11 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Church of the Saviour, 651 N. Wayne Ave., Wayne. Interment is private.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, Samaritan's Purse or other mission organizations.


STORY
 

MrRING

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#16
Good-bye Beauty that killed the Beast:

Actress Fay Wray of `King Kong' Fame Dies
By KAREN MATTHEWS, Associated Press Writer

NEW YORK - Fay Wray, who won everlasting fame as the damsel held atop the Empire State Building by the giant ape in the 1933 film classic "King Kong," has died, a close friend said Monday. She was 96. Wray died Sunday at her Manhattan apartment, said Rick McKay, a friend and director of the last film she appeared in. There was no official cause of death.

"She just kind of drifted off quietly as if she was going to sleep," said McKay, director of the documentary Broadway: The Golden Age. "She just kind of gave out."

During a career that started in 1923, Wray appeared with such stars as Ronald Colman, Gary Cooper and Spencer Tracy, but she was destined to be linked with the rampaging Kong in movie fans' minds. "I used to resent `King Kong,'" she remarked in a 1963 interview. "But now I don't fight it anymore. I realize that it is a classic, and I am pleased to be associated with it. Why, only recently an entire issue of a French magazine was devoted to discussing the picture from its artistic, moral and even religious aspects."

She wrote in her 1988 autobiography, "On the Other Hand": "Each time I arrive in New York and see the skyline and the exquisite beauty of the Empire State Building, my heart beats a little faster. I like that feeling. I really like it!"

"King Kong" obscured the other notable films Wray made during the '30s. They included adventures "The Four Feathers" (with Richard Arlen and William Powell) and "Viva Villa" (Wallace Beery), Westerns "The Texan" (Cooper) and "The Conquering Horde" (Arlen), romances "One Sunday Afternoon" (Cooper) and "The Unholy Garden" (Colman) as well as horror films "Dr. X" and "The Mystery of the Wax Museum."

After appearing in Erich von Stroheim's 1928 silent "The Wedding March," playing a poor Viennese girl abandoned by her lover, a playboy prince, Wray became a much-employed leading lady. In 1933, the year of "King Kong," she appeared in 11 films, co-starring with Beery, George Raft, Cooper, Jack Holt and others. In 1980, she told of her dissatisfaction with roles of that period: "In those days, the female characters never knew who their parents were. Leading ladies were not supposed to be funny but were supposed to stand there and look beautiful. That was frustrating as an actress."

In her autobiography, the actress recalled that she had been paid $10,000 for "King Kong" (budget: $680,000), but her 10 weeks' work was stretched over a 10-month period. "Residuals were not even considered, because there were no established unions to protect us," she added.

In "King Kong," she plays an unemployed actress who agrees to take a job with a movie company that is going on location to a mysterious island. Kong is the huge ape that inhabits a part of the island. When the film company discovers him, Kong is attracted to Wray and abducts her. But he is eventually captured and brought to New York and put on display. Kong escapes and finds Wray, with terrifying results, but eventually meets his death on the Empire State Building.

She was proud that "King Kong" had saved RKO studio from bankruptcy. Of Kong she wrote: "He is a very real and individual entity. He has a personality, a character that has been compelling to many different people for many different reasons and viewpoints."

She was the guest of honor in 1991 at a ceremony marking the 60th birthday of the Empire State Building, saying that if she were mayor of New York, "I would want to run the city from this building ... and get up every morning to see the sun rise."

Although Kong appeared huge, the full figure was really only 18 inches tall. Miss Wray knew him by the arm, which was 8 feet long. "I would stand on the floor," she recalled, "and they would bring this arm down and cinch it around my waist, then pull me up in the air. Every time I moved, one of the fingers would loosen, so it would look like I was trying to get away. Actually, I was trying not to slip through his hand."

By the late '30s, the actress was appearing in low-budget films, and she quit working in 1942 to be a wife and mother. Her first husband was John Monk Saunders, who wrote such air films as "Wings" and "The Dawn Patrol." She was 19 and he was 30 when they married. She discovered he was an alcoholic and a drug addict, and the marriage became a nightmare.

After a divorce, she married Robert Riskin, the brilliant writer of "It Happened One Night," "Lost Horizon" and other Frank Capra films. In 1950, he suffered a stroke from which he never recovered. He died five years later. Returning to work in 1953, Wray appeared mostly in motherly roles in youth-oriented films like "Small Town Girl," "Tammy and the Bachelor" and "Summer Love." In 1979 she played opposite Henry Fonda in a TV drama, "Gideon's Trumpet."

She was born Vina Fay Wray on Sept. 15, 1907, near Cardston in rural Alberta, Canada. Her parents moved to the United States when she was 3, first trying farming in Arizona, and eventually returning to Salt Lake City, where Wray's mother was from. Later, they settled in Los Angeles. As a teenager she haunted studio casting offices and won an occasional bit role. Despite her mother's fears that the movie crowd was sinful, Miss Wray was allowed to accept a six-month contract with Hal Roach at $60 a week.

Wray had a daughter, Susan, from her first marriage and a daughter and son, Victoria and Robert Jr., by the second. Sixteen years after Riskin's death, she married his physician, Dr. Sandford Rothenberg.


http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/obit_wray
 
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Anonymous

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#17
Whatever happened to Fay Wray? That delicate, satin-draped f

Fay Wray in 'King Kong' in that clingy satin number, with apparently not a stitch on underneath... drool.

I had a crush on her for years.
 

escargot

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#20
Watched 'King Kong' on TV as a kid with my family, and sat squirming as Fay Wray did nothing but scream.....and scream....and scream...... :rolleyes:

A fine female role model. (Insert extremely sarcastic smiley here.)
 
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Anonymous

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#21
escargot said:
Watched 'King Kong' on TV as a kid with my family, and sat squirming as Fay Wray did nothing but scream.....and scream....and scream...... :rolleyes:

A fine female role model. (Insert extremely sarcastic smiley here.)
she did a bit of acting on the boat over to the island... and a supriseingly sexy dance.... i presume i saw the uncut version (kong chewed up some natives in close up and stomped some too) The dance was probably too sexual for latter audiences.

Not great male rolemodels either...great white hunters or macho shitheads!
 

Tyger_Lily

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#22
Wasn't her whole script: Arggggggghhhhhhggggggggggggg!

And to thrash about in her nightie? Nice job if you can get it!!!
 

Tyger_Lily

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#24
Nope, and if I could make a living screaming and thrashing about in my nightie neither would I!!! :D
 
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Anonymous

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#25
Re: Whatever happened to Fay Wray? That delicate, satin-drap

AndroMan said:
Fay Wray in 'King Kong' in that clingy satin number, with apparently not a stitch on underneath... drool.

I had a crush on her for years.
"Whatever happened to Fay Wray?
That delicate, satin-draped frame

As it clung to her thigh
How I started to cry

Cos I wanted to be dressed just the same......."
 
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Anonymous

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#26
Re: Re: Whatever happened to Fay Wray? That delicate, satin-

Conners said:
Cos I wanted to be dressed just the same......."
You trying to tell us something, Conners?
 

Anome

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#28
Re: Re: Re: Re: Whatever happened to Fay Wray? That delicate

Pete Younger said:
And Anome!:)
Only that The Rocky Horror Show had a strong influence on me as a kid.

Seriously, my mother was obsessed with it, and dragged me at the age of 7 off to see the movie when it came out.

At least she didn't dress me in fetish gear.
 
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Anonymous

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#29
Re: Whatever happened to Fay Wray? That delicate, satin-drap

AndroMan said:
Fay Wray in 'King Kong' in that clingy satin number, with apparently not a stitch on underneath... drool.

I had a crush on her for years.
didn't everyone? :)
 

escargot

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#30
Being female and straight I didn't fancy her. I just found her embarrassing. I mean, when you're about 8-9 and you need to act out last night's fillum on TV next morning in the playground, who's going to want to 'play' Fay Wray?

I'd rather have played the gorilla or even one of the natives. :mad:

Same problem with most of Gerry Anderson's output. It was cool to be an Angel but Lady Penelope, well, all she did that was cool was smoke. :D

This is true: I had a Lady Penelope doll which came with a hole between 2 of her fingers and a cigarette in a long holder to slot into it. :rolleyes:
 
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