The R.I.P. Thread

OneWingedBird

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Wasn't Orridge framed by a Channel 4 documentary to look like a paedophile, when the footage they had actually showed him/her with willing participants over the age of consent? That was the reason s/he pissed off out of the country. RIP anyway, a unique individual.
Yes, he was on holiday in (i think) Tibet at the time, UK police wouldn't confirm if he was facing charges if returning to the UK and Gen and then wife Paula were scared that their kids would be taken off of them so they scarpered to the US.

IIRC the police had seized videos from Gen's house showing involvement with ritual scarification and were probably waiting for the Operation Spanner prosecution to see if they could get a result out of it.
 

JamesWhitehead

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French actor/singer Suzy Delair passed on the 15th March at 102.

She may not be a household name in the UK but she sang the songs in the last film of Laurel & Hardy - they are omitted from most English-language prints, alas!

She also featured in films of Clouzot and Visconti. RIP. :clap:
 

OneWingedBird

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I was stuck at Harrow-on-the-Hill some 20 years ago - windy, dark and a single announcement on the PA saying something about a signal failure outside the station. Nothing came or went on any of the six platforms for over an hour, my fellow passengers dissipated and the station Staff vanished. Time slowed down and as I waiting for a Rod Serling voice-over, I fished out a copy of the Daily Telegraph and read it from cover to cover. In the Arts section was a small piece from a Journalist whose brother had gone to the same college as Genesis P Orridge and from him had learnt that Mr Orridge had just sneaked back into the UK from a self-imposed exile abroad (that had been encouraged by MI5 and the Authorities apparently). I recognised the name (and his female partner Cosey Fanni Tutti) from Throbbing Gristle and in the New Musial Express (NME) as discussed in the schoolyard 20 years before then. Until today I thought the one popular ditty I knew from Throbbing Gristle was "I can't come" ("an iconoclastic mantra of amphetamine-induced sexual dysfunction" -Wiki) - but have just learnt this was penned by another popular beat combo at the time -The Snivelling Shits. Leader singer of the Shits was Giovanni Dadomo who died in 1997, about the time I was reading the article on Mr Orridge.
Might it have been 1999? Gen played the Royal Festival Hall on 1st May that year for the 'Time's Up' gig with various acts including Quentin Crisp as master of ceremonies, supposedly by live video link from NY though I think it might just have been prerecorded ;) AFAIK that was the first time he'd officially returned to the UK.

Cracking evening.

 

Krepostnoi

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I also listened to The News Huddlines, but he was incredibly prolific, from drama to comedy, and excellent at it all. He was even in a "stop littering" public information film. And of course an absolute expert on music hall. RIP.
Further to his expertise, I just stumbled across this story on a comedy forum, which would be equally at home here:
Roy Hudd was the subject of one of the best celebrity ghost stories that I know. From childhood he had had a recurring dream about visiting a certain house. He would go through the front door and wander from room to room. Sometimes he would go out into the garden where there were lights and bunting and other signs that a party was to be held. The dream would always end with him going down the steps to the cellar, which was lined with mirrors. He never saw anyone in this dream and nothing ever happened except the route through his house would occasionally change.

Many years later a friend invited him around to see the new house he had just bought. He felt that Hudd, with his interest in the English Music Hall, would be particularly keen to see it as it used to be owned by Dan Leno, the most esteemed Music Hall performer of the last years of the nineteenth century. As Hudd drove to the address, the deja vu began. By the time he pulled up outside he knew it was - literally - the house of his dreams. When his friend opened the door Hudd barged his way in and said, "Right, in this room is..." and he described correctly the general appearance of the room, and all the others in the house.

He didn't know much about Dan Leno at the time but subsequently researched his life deeply. He told the story many times, and was once warned by a medium that he should never visit Dan Leno's grave. Hudd said he scoffed at the advice but nevertheless chose to follow it, just in case
 

Tribble

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Vardoger

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Country legend Kenny Rogers, dies at 81.

Country Music Icon Kenny Rogers Dies at 81
By CHRIS MORRIS
Vocalist Kenny Rogers, who dominated the pop and country charts in the 1970s and 1980s with a string of sleekly tailored hits and won three Grammys, has died. He was 81. Rogers “passed away peacefully at home from natural causes under the care of hospice and surrounded by his family,” a representative for the singer said in a statement. Due to the national COVID-19 emergency, the family is planning a small private service at this time with a public memorial planned for a later date.

Rogers had announced a farewell tour in 2015 and was able to keep it going through December 2017. In April 2018, shortly before he was to spend a few months finishing out the tour after a break, he announced that he was having to call off the remaining dates (including a planned appearance at the Stagecoach Festival in California), due to unspecified “health challenges.” “I didn’t want to take forever to retire,” Rogers said his April 2018 statement. “I’ve thoroughly enjoyed this opportunity to say farewell to the fans over the course of the past two years on ‘The Gambler’s Last Deal’ tour. I could never properly thank them for the encouragement and support they’ve given me throughout my career and the happiness I’ve experienced as a result of that.”
https://variety.com/2020/music/obituaries-people-news/kenny-rogers-dead-dies-1203541233/

 

Yithian

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I sing Kenny Rogers songs at work every day. It's amazing how many situations they cover.
Universal advice:

You've got to know when to hold 'em
Know when to fold 'em
Know when to walk away
And know when to run


You never count your money
When you're sittin' at the table
There'll be time enough for countin'
When the dealin's done.
 

escargot

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Universal advice:

You've got to know when to hold 'em
Know when to fold 'em
Know when to walk away
And know when to run


You never count your money
When you're sittin' at the table
There'll be time enough for countin'
When the dealin's done.
If I were at work today, and if there were any punters, I'd've got everyone singing that.
 

escargot

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You sounds like you're living in a musical.
I sing all day at work. It helps move the customers on. ;)

After Victoria Wood's death I held up a copy of the Woman's Weekly and got the ladies singing 'Not weakly! Not meekly! Beat me on the bottom with the Woman's Weekly! Let's do it! Let's do it tonight!'

My singing made someone cry last year. For some reason I walked in doing 'In the Navy' with salutes, hand wave movements etc, and set off a colleague whose best mate had joined up and just that morning set off for Naval training. The stiff upper lip went out of the window.
 

Tigerhawk

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I sing all day at work. It helps move the customers on. ;)

After Victoria Wood's death I held up a copy of the Woman's Weekly and got the ladies singing 'Not weakly! Not meekly! Beat me on the bottom with the Woman's Weekly! Let's do it! Let's do it tonight!'

My singing made someone cry last year. For some reason I walked in doing 'In the Navy' with salutes, hand wave movements etc, and set off a colleague whose best mate had joined up and just that morning set off for Naval training. The stiff upper lip went out of the window.
My singing also makes people cry - which is why I only sing at the deserving! You know who you are!
 
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Veteran radio DJ Pete Mitchell, who championed a generation of indie bands, has died aged 61.The former BBC Radio 2 and 6 Music broadcaster, originally from Crumpsall in Manchester, collapsed while walking near his home in Stockport on Thursday.A statement from family friend Jo Houlcroft confirmed the father-of-two's death. Across a 34-year career, Mitchell championed dozens of acts from his home city, as well as The Charlatans.
This has been driving me up the wall since I heard of Pete Mitchell's death.

I cannot for the life of me remember where, or in what context, I heard the story, but I'm sure that Mitchell and another Piccadilly Radio DJ (this is before he went on to the BBC) got caught up in a haunting at their studios, sometime in the 80's or 90's. The only real detail I remember (there were others, I just don't recall them) is that at one point Mitchell started hearing children's voices over his headset - I think he threatened to walk off air before being persuaded to carry on (in fact I think he might have actually walked out of the studio and had to be wrestled back in before the track being played ended).

I was reminded of this when, some years back, the Radio 4 comedy programme Down the Line broadcast a genre busting episode, set in a mothballed studio in Maida Vale while renovation work was being done to the regular venue. The episode started off as regular comedy, but the last ten minutes or so shift into a different territory, one which is really actually quite spooky, in a way that - to my mind - only radio can do. Fragmentary and disembodied children's voices heard over the cans were part of the episode, and I've often wondered if that vaguely remembered experience of Mitchell's might have been an inspiration. The BBC's Ghost Story for Christmas: The Dead Room, did a similar thing a couple of years ago.

A quick google doesn't turn up anything online - apart from some references to the better known haunting of Capital Radio's old studios on Euston Road in London.

Edit: Actually, the Capital Radio references are in relation to their later studios in Leicester Square, not the older ones at Euston Tower.
 
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Mythopoeika

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This has been driving me up the wall since I heard of Pete Mitchell's death.

I cannot for the life of me remember where, or in what context, I heard the story, but I'm sure that Mitchell and another Piccadilly Radio DJ (this is before he went on to the BBC) got caught up in a haunting at their studios, sometime in the 80's or 90's. The only real detail I remember (there were others, I just don't recall them) is that at one point Mitchell started hearing children's voices over his headset - I think he threatened to walk off air before being persuaded to carry on (in fact I think he might have actually walked out of the studio and had to be wrestled back in before the track being played ended).

I was reminded of this when, some years back, the Radio 4 comedy programme Down the Line broadcast a genre busting episode, set in a mothballed studio in Maida Vale while renovation work was being done to the regular venue. The episode started off as regular comedy, but the last ten minutes or so shift into a different territory, one which is really actually quite spooky, in a way that - to my mind - only radio can do. Fragmentary and disembodied children's voices heard over the cans were part of the episode, and I've often wondered if that vaguely remembered experience of Mitchell's might have been an inspiration. The BBC's Ghost Story for Christmas: The Dead Room, did a similar thing a couple of years ago.

A quick google doesn't turn up anything online - apart from some references to the better known haunting of Capital Radio's old studios on Euston Road in London.

Edit: Actually, the Capital Radio references are in relation to their later studios in Leicester Square, not the older ones at Euston Tower.
Years ago, I had a friend who was a BBC radio senior studio manager. She told me about one of the radio studios, mentioning that it didn't get used much because it was haunted. I didn't get much detail from her, sorry.
 
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Years ago, I had a friend who was a BBC radio senior studio manager. She told me about one of the radio studios, mentioning that it didn't get used much because it was haunted. I didn't get much detail from her, sorry.
And of course room 333 at the Langham Hotel (owned and used by the BBC between the 60's and 80's) has been referred to as the most haunted room in London - having scared the living daylights out of several TV presenters billeted there during that period, and still putting the wind up guests to this very day, I believe.

But we're getting off thread.
 

Lord Lucan

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Another wonderful actress, Suzy Delair leaves us at age 102.

Suzy Delair, French Star of Movies and Music Halls, Dies at 102

Her career included a long association with the director Henri-Georges Clouzot and a starring role in Laurel and Hardy’s last film.

Suzy Delair, a French film actress and music-hall singer best known for her 1940s thrillers directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot, her starring role in Laurel and Hardy’s last movie and her cheeky screen persona, died on March 15 at a retirement home in Paris. She was 102.

The death was reported by the French magazine Le Point.

To French cineastes, Ms. Delair was most closely identified with “Quai des Orfèvres” (1947), Clouzot’s acclaimed police melodrama about an ambitious and recklessly flirtatious singer, her jealous husband and a murder investigation.

When the film opened in New York in January 1948 as “Jenny Lamour” (the stage name of Ms. Delair’s character), Bosley Crowther praised it in The New York Times and described Ms. Delair’s character as “both vivid and credible, a creature of normal contradictions, pathetic aspirations and deceits.”

It was her third film with Clouzot, after “Le Dernier de Six” (“The Last of Six,” 1941) and “L’Assassin Habite … sur 21” (“The Murderer Lives at No. 21,” 1942), both made in Paris during the German Occupation.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/20/movies/suzy-delair-dead.html
 

Yithian

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I have often posted links to Youtube videos by "EMG Colonel"

There are thousands of them.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCya7WTG2pJSM1x78atI8GXQ


They are not visually splendid. The Colonel remains out-of-sight and introduces them with a ritual greeting:

"Good-day to you, viewers! The Colonel speaking to you live from the preceptory [always pronounced Pryceptory] of British Imperial Youtube BroadCAsting . . ."

Most follow a simple routine, which includes the record-of-the-day being shown to the camera, though details are seldom legible. Some eccentricities are fixtures, such as using the germanic orkester in place of orchestra. He routinely draws a spiral of wax on the surface of the record before playing the side through on the EMG machine, with its vast papier-maché horn, which gives him his assumed identity.

The persona adopted is of an eccentric enthusiast, living in an inherited stately pile with endless time to devote to collecting old gramophones and hundreds of thousands of records. From time to time, the Colonel gives us glimpses of his vast but chaotic library and there is talk of endless work being necessary to make the mansion habitable. Mainly we see the unchanging clutter of his listening-room. In a few of the later videos, he refers to his work for the Civil Service, hinting that the Ministry is hush-hush and his own rôle important.

His taste in music was highly unusual. He could, on occasion, dig out a complete pre-First-War Pathé set of Romeo et Juliet and wade through its many sides in successive videos. He would tantalize us with his 1924 Gerontius - almost complete but he played only a brief excerpt. In the main, he steered away from the classics, preferring to focus on ancient ballads, songs and sketches, novelty numbers, oddities and the whole chaotic Babel of gramophone cast-offs. Here were polkas, vocal gems and recitations. Here were Celeste Octets and ragtime played on bells. It was stuff that a studious child might play once out of curiosity and break out of spite.

He had no time for discographic niceties, such as matrix numbers or exact time and place of recording. He was, however, unfailingly respectful of the record, maintaining silence while it plays and quickly signing off with another ritual form-of-words.

"Hopefully, you enjoyed that. I certainly did! Thank you and goodbye!"

Tea for Two by the Comedien Harmonists
was played on an HMV gramophone and he posted it on the 25th of January this year.


The automatic brake takes a moment to work at the end. It is the end, as the Colonel, otherwise known as Stephen Peppiatt, died five days later. He was just 47.

I was fully aware of another side to Peppiatt, which was hard to reconcile with the constructed persona. He was a good hater. His UK Gramophone-Collecting Forum contains a section with the following subheading


"CLPGS Watch or Society News
Keeping an Eye on the Gramophone "Ring" Members, , Perverts (Names removed) , Foot fetishists, Bankrupt EMG Graverobbers, Cancer sufferer Killers & Spivs. Suicide risk, Adulterer, Girl Buggering TMF Admins, Gay Club visitors, Crapophone Makers & Vendors, Multi - Name Ebay Vendors, Bogus Legal Complainants, Roger Thorne Estate Looters, Matrix Number Bores, Convicted Drug Dealers & Cannabis Growers & users of the "Learned Society" AKA "XXXXXXX XXXXXXX's Magical gramophone Music Tour & "Those boring Old Men with their Wind Up machines " AKA in the Gay World "The Wrinkle room" "

CLPGS is the City of London Phonograph & Gramophone Society on which Pepiatt had declared war. Much of the detail is obscured by the way online accusations were posted and then taken down for legal reasons. By the time his forum moved to its new server, Pepiatt was reduced to cryptic fulminations, some of which remain on the forum.

Now his enemies rejoice and give a very different picture of The Colonel, though it hard to imagine the videos were taken in his room in his mother's council house. It is not the obituary he would have wanted, for sure. Meanwhile, the Youtube legacy of 8,706 videos must be his monument.

We do, finally, get to see The Colonel on this cached page.


RIP. :salute:
 
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