The R.I.P. Thread

JamesWhitehead

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Yes, Robert Godridge, who made those videos, seems to have been genuinely startled to find that, as a fellow-enthusiast, he was the beneficiary of Peppiatt's will. The bequest may seem like a collector's dream but the logistics of sorting, moving and sifting such a legacy are considerable. I dare say that many here will never have handled a 78 rpm shellac record: they are seriously heavy and notoriously brittle. Anything less than industrial-strength shelving will not support many of them!

I have retained only 1,000 or so 78s in physical form and rather reluctantly passed on acquiring more, when they are offered. Partly, that is lack of space but they usually turn up after years of being kept in garages and attics. The smell of mildew is ominous, as it can eat into the surface, creating noise that is hard to filter.

Stephen Peppiatt was wise in choosing Mr Godridge to continue his work. He has kept up a steady flow of transfers on his Youtube channel. The records he did not want to keep have been dispached to archive.org in America. Their declared and slightly-Quixotic quest is to digitize the whole of the 78 rpm era. A lot of work has been done but just browsing the stuff that emerges onto Youtube, I am beginning to understand just how quickly gramophone records became an international industry. Every country was churning out material to keep the wheels turning. Our domestic catalogues are just the tip of a very large shellacberg! :actw:
 
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Yithian

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Yes, Robert Godridge, who made those videos, seems to have been genuinely startled to find that, as a fellow-enthusiast, he was the beneficiary of Peppiatt's will. The bequest may seem like a collector's dream but the logistics of sorting, moving and sifting such a legacy are considerable. I dare say that many here will never have handled a 78 rpm shellac record: they are seriously heavy and notoriously brittle. Anything less than industrial-strength shelving will not support many of them!

I have retained only 1,000 or so 78s in physical form and rather reluctantly passed on acquiring more, when they are offered. Partly, that is lack of space but they usually turn up after years of being kept in garages and attics. The smell of mildew is ominous, as it can eat into the surface, creating noise that is hard to filter.

Stephen Peppiatt was wise in choosing Mr Godridge to continue his work. He has kept up a steady flow of transfers on his Youtube channel. The records he did not want to keep have been dispached to archive.org in America. Their declared and slightly-Quixotic quest is to digitize the whole of the 78 rpm era. A lot of work has been done but just browsing the stuff that emerges onto Youtube, I am beginning to understand just how quickly gramophone records became an international industry. Every country was churning out material to keep the wheels turning. Our domestic catalogues are just the tip of a very large shellacberg! :actw:
The hints from Godridge are that while Peppiatt was more than a little eccentric and plenty difficult he was not necessarily the bad 'un that he has been painted as--at least not as bad as that blog-post you linked to after his death.

Anyway, satisfying that a good chunk of it will be digitised.
 

JamesWhitehead

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not as bad as that blog-post you linked to after his death.
The flame-fests and legal battles - or threats of legal battles - have mainly been expunged from the internet. Mainly, I had read Peppiatt's fulminations, which were obsessive enough, though, latterly, somewhat coded. The nasty obitchery linked-to did reveal the true colours of his adversaries, as they shamelessly celebrated his demise.

I think videos stay up on Youtube indefinitely, so the EMG Colonel's work should be preserved. I am curious to know if the videos exist in higher resolution. The posted versions were always highly-condensed for file-size. :thought:
 

Tempest63

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Folk singer Julie Felix dies at the age of 81.
The musician, who moved to the UK from California in 1964, rose to fame as the resident singer on Sir David Frost’s show The Frost Report and also hosted her own programme on the BBC titled Once More With Felix.

she died after a short illnes.
 

gordonrutter

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EnolaGaia

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African jazz great Manu Dibango dies in France of virus

Manu Dibango, who fused African rhythms with funk to become one of the most influential musicians in world dance music, died Tuesday with the coronavirus, according to his music publisher. He was 86.

The Cameroon-born saxophonist, who gained international fame with his 1972 song “Soul Makossa,” died in a hospital in the Paris region, Thierry Durepaire said.

Dibango was hospitalized with an illness “linked to COVID-19,” his official Facebook page said last week.

“Soul Makossa” was one of the earliest hits in the nascent world music scene, including a catchy hook copied by some of the world’s biggest pop stars. ...
FULL STORY: https://apnews.com/b7aca5490656b064bba690eb19a5291e
 

JamesWhitehead

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In the comments underneath the Guardian's obit. of Julie Felix, a poster notes that Tom Lehrer has also died recently.

I have found no confirmation of this online, though Lehrer is in his nineties. He is long-retired but I hope the poster was mistaken. :(
 
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GNC

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Although he hadn't made a proper film for a while, I'm sad to mark the passing of Stuart "Re-Animator" Gordon:
Obit

He had a real knack for making shock tactics funny and even thought-provoking. I wish he had made more films, but Re-Animator is one to be very proud of, I remember the first time I encountered it and had never seen anything like it, funny, disgusting, subversive, a gem. RIP.
 
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An opponent of the mullahs has died.

Yassamine Mather celebrates a brave and outspoken critic of the Islamic regime.

Professor Fariborz Raisdana, who died on March 16 in a Tehran hospital, was a leftwing economist, political activist and author, who lived and worked in Iran. According to relatives, his hospital admission was as a result of showing symptoms of coronavirus. He had a long-standing heart condition.

Raisdana faced many restrictions imposed by the Islamic Republic, yet never missed an opportunity to express openly his support for socialism, and the class struggles of the Iranian working class. An economist by training, he had a degree and a PhD from the London School of Economics. But he was much more than a university lecturer. An activist and a member of Iran’s writers association, he was an outspoken critic of the Islamic Republic and often one of the first at political protests, including student and workers’ gatherings, in the last two decades.

During and after the episode known as ‘serial political murders’, when a number of dissident intellectuals critical of the Islamic Republic system were murdered or disappeared (1988-98), Raisdana was one of the few intellectuals who bravely took every opportunity to protest. He attended the funerals of leftwing writers killed during this period and was often the spokesperson for their families.

https://weeklyworker.co.uk/worker/1291/death-of-a-radical-intellectual/
 

Tigerhawk

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JamesWhitehead

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maximus otter

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FAREWELL TO SPECIAL-EFFECTS MODEL MAKER BILL PEARSON

WE ARE VERY sad to learn of the death of professional model maker Bill Pearson.


Mat Irvine: “A special-effects model maker extraordinaire, Bill Pearson is probably best known for being a model-shop supervisor for such movie classics as Alien(1979), Flash Gordon (1980), and Outland (1981).

Bill was a member of the BBC Visual Effects Department for two years or so in the early 1980s, which is when I got to know him. While he was at BBC VFX he worked on a variety of programmes, including The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Doctor Who, and Blake’s 7.

Later, Bill worked on Gerry Anderson’s Space Precinct (1994), The James Bond movie Die Another Day (2002), Gravity (2013), Duncan Jones’ Moon (2009), and the Red Dwarf series.”

http://www.scalemodelnews.com/2020/03/farewell-to-special-effects-model-maker.html#more

maximus otter
 

JamesWhitehead

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Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki has died at the age of 86.

You may think you don't know his works but his expressionist choral music has been incorporated into film-music's clichés, thanks to the use of his works in The Shining and The Exorcist etc.

As he aged, his music lost its exploratory edge. A long illness preceded his death, so there had been no new works for over ten years, I gather.

He was not a victim of the corona virus, though his carer had recently tested positive. RIP.

Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima, 1960.

There is a useful video, linked there, which explains the composer's unusual notation. It may also be worth pointing-out that the emotive title was given to the work after its composition; it was originally called simply 8'37" in tribute to John Cage's 4'33"!
 
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GNC

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I was just about to post that about Krzysztof. I'm no expert in classical, avant garde especially, but his stuff worked like a dream (or a nightmare) in a some significant movies and TV. Last heard in Twin Peaks' return (the truly nutzoid black and white episode). RIP.
 

Yithian

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Former anti-Nazi Greek resistance fighter and MEP Manolis Glezos dies aged 97

Tributes poured in Monday as word spread that the indefatigable Greek leftist, who as a teenager tore down the Nazi swastika flag from the Acropolis and more than seven decades later was elected as an MEP for the radical Syriza party, had died of heart failure at the age of 97.

“For all eternity he will remain the symbol of a fighter,” Alexis Tsipras, the party leader and former prime minister, said. “The left, all of us today, feel like orphans but also so lucky to have walked with him.”

Sentenced to death multiple times, confined to a prison cell for sixteen years and awarded the Lenin peace prize, Glezos took as much pride in his writing and political activism as he did his heroic wartime antics.

When, at the age of 92, he was elected to the European parliament, his enduring popularity saw him win more votes than any other Greek MEP, but it was his courage as a young man ripping down the swastika from the Acropolis, within days of Nazi forces overrunning Greece, for which he is most famous.

Then 18, the young Glezos had scaled the walls of the ancient citadel with a comrade in the dead of night on 30 May 1941 on a mission to remove the hated symbol. The first act of defiance under German occupation was credited with boosting morale and spurring the country’s resistance movement.

Glezos was subsequently arrested and tortured.


More on his life:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...e-fighter-and-mep-manolis-glezos-dies-aged-98
 

Naughty_Felid

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View attachment 24801
Former anti-Nazi Greek resistance fighter and MEP Manolis Glezos dies aged 97

Tributes poured in Monday as word spread that the indefatigable Greek leftist, who as a teenager tore down the Nazi swastika flag from the Acropolis and more than seven decades later was elected as an MEP for the radical Syriza party, had died of heart failure at the age of 97.

“For all eternity he will remain the symbol of a fighter,” Alexis Tsipras, the party leader and former prime minister, said. “The left, all of us today, feel like orphans but also so lucky to have walked with him.”

Sentenced to death multiple times, confined to a prison cell for sixteen years and awarded the Lenin peace prize, Glezos took as much pride in his writing and political activism as he did his heroic wartime antics.

When, at the age of 92, he was elected to the European parliament, his enduring popularity saw him win more votes than any other Greek MEP, but it was his courage as a young man ripping down the swastika from the Acropolis, within days of Nazi forces overrunning Greece, for which he is most famous.

Then 18, the young Glezos had scaled the walls of the ancient citadel with a comrade in the dead of night on 30 May 1941 on a mission to remove the hated symbol. The first act of defiance under German occupation was credited with boosting morale and spurring the country’s resistance movement.

Glezos was subsequently arrested and tortured.

More on his life:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...e-fighter-and-mep-manolis-glezos-dies-aged-98
It was a tricky time to stay alive during WW2 with so many parties trying to take over the country. Even fighting the Nazi's various freedom fighters couldn't agree on much. It's a tribute this guy managed to stay alive whatever you think of his politics.
 
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