The R.I.P. Thread

Yithian

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#61
The Yithian said:
No evidence yet but for a man with fire in his blood the ravages of age can be harder than any battles or struggles.
"Being shot out of a cannon is always better than being squeezed through a tube."

- Hunter S. Thompson, Song of the Sausage Creature in Kingdom of Fear.
 

AsamiYamazaki

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#62
Hunter S Thompson was grand. It seemed to me that he could step outside and view America like no one else, which is pretty ironic given his gonzo style.
 

BaronVonHoopla

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#63
Very very sad . . . and what saddens me most is that now the rest of his body of work will be muddied to an extent . . . the same way Hemingway is always clouded by his own end.

Everything written about Abbie Hoffman now seems to smirk about his suicide, I fear this will happen with Hunter as well.

I hope not.

-Fitz
 

lopaka

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#64
Fitz said:
Very very sad . . . and what saddens me most is that now the rest of his body of work will be muddied to an extent . . . the same way Hemingway is always clouded by his own end.

Everything written about Abbie Hoffman now seems to smirk about his suicide, I fear this will happen with Hunter as well.

I hope not.

-Fitz
Even though there are some significant differences between them, Abbie Hoffman is who I thought of as well. :(
 

Thirtysixth_Bee

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#65
My husband and I were also sad to hear about this. Sixty-seven seems too young to go, but I respect Mr. Thompson's choice. :(
 

Rrose_Selavy

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#67
The Yithian said:
sidecar_jon said:
somhow i expected him to go from drugs etc... not this way...maybe he had health issues?
Heckler said:
From his pesudo autobiography Kingdom of Fear he always seemed a man with plenty of friends and pretty much on top of the world. Very very sad. :cry:

I wonder with his propensity for firearms if this might have been an accident?
No evidence yet but for a man with fire in his blood the ravages of age can be harder than any battles or struggles.

Perhaps an ilness came along and he wanted to leave on his own terms. Who knows? Perhaps he wanted an authentic exit to a sculpted life a la Hemmingway. Whatever the case is i lament his passing. I've much of his writing here and it's vivid, sharp and refreshing.
Caught Ralph Steadman on Channel 4 who said Thompson had told him that he would take his own llife as he had had poor health, various operations and was in a wheelchair IIRC.

Never had much interest in him or his work but acknowledge his influence. Steadman made a good definition of "gonzo" journalism - it's when YOU become the story.
 
A

Anonymous

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#68
Hunter s Thompson

Hunter S Thompson died on Sunday from a self inflicted gunshot wound to the head.
I put Fear and loathing in Las Vegas on the DVD and drank lots of whisky to commemorate the passing of a great writer.
What a waste of a brilliant mind. :(
 
A

Anonymous

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#69
Rrose Selavy said:
[quote="Th

Caught Ralph Steadman on Channel 4 who said Thompson had told him that he would take his own llife as he had had poor health, various operations and was in a wheelchair IIRC.

Never had much interest in him or his work but acknowledge his influence. Steadman made a good definition of "gonzo" journalism - it's when YOU become the story.

interesting despite Hunters seemingly bad opinion of Steadman they kept in touch.
 

Anome

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#70
Not sure what his "bad opinion" of Steadman was. They certainly hung out together a lot, and Steadman did the illustrations for most of Thompson's books.

I do recall reading one piece where he explained how Steadman could be embarassing in company because he would draw pictures of people that would be typical Steadman charicatures and piss the subject off.
 
A

Anonymous

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#71
anome said:
Not sure what his "bad opinion" of Steadman was. They certainly hung out together a lot, and Steadman did the illustrations for most of Thompson's books.

I do recall reading one piece where he explained how Steadman could be embarassing in company because he would draw pictures of people that would be typical Steadman charicatures and piss the subject off.

i read a Thompson piece about haveing to work with "this whineing limey"... bu tthat seemed to be the first time they met. Obviosly they went on to become friends, which i didnt know.
 

BaronVonHoopla

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#72
That was just Hunter's schtick . . . he would say the same thing about anyone he liked. If you read his work this is pretty evident, although its sometimes hard to decypher as he talks about most people in the same manner. It's a fine line.

Also, I don't know if the comparison to Irvine Welsh is fair, they are not comparable at all.

-Fitz
 
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#73
I'd only just started getting into this guy's work after someone I know cited them as a big influence:

Polish Artist Beksinski Found Murdered - Police

Tue Feb 22,11:41 AM ET


WARSAW (Reuters) - Polish contemporary artist Zdzislaw Beksinski, famed for his haunting fantasy paintings, has been found murdered at his home, police said Tuesday.

Police said they found multiple wounds on Beksinski's body, discovered at his flat in a prestigious Warsaw neighborhood.

"His body was found late last night by his family. He had several wounds, some on his chest, which could have been caused by for example a dagger," police spokeswoman Zuzanna Talar said.

The 75-year-old artist became famous around Europe and Japan in the 1970s and 80s for his paintings that depicted disfigured objects or people against a background of hazy romantic light.

"He was one of the best known artists of Poland. He created a language, a climate of horror and secrecy in his paintings. He engaged people's imagination and it was very convincing," said Katarzyna Nowakowska-Sito, curator of modern art at Warsaw's National Museum.

Beksinski, born in the south-east town of Sanok in 1929, was also a photographer and sculptor, and drew pictures often compared to the work of Austrian Ernst Fuchs, founder of a fantastic-realism school.
Source

His homepage if you haven't seen his stuff (requires Flash):

www.beksinski.pl

[edit: Seems the front page has been taken down for the time being for condolences but you can still access the main Flash movie here:

www.beksinski.pl/glowna.swf

given the nature of his work it all seems very haunting and, somehow, fittingly sombre.]
 
A

Anonymous

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#74
I loved Hunter Thompson's coverage of the Watergate story. And, in particular, his coverage of that day when Nixon helicoptered - out, off the Whitehouse lawn. Checking that he had really gone :)

I met Inge Morath. I made the coffee and took notes when my then boss was interviewing her. So I wasn't a big player! She was married to Arthur Miller. She was deeply impressive, intelligent, polite, enthusiastic and kind. He must have been quite a guy to have been married to someone so fantastic and interesting.
 
A

Anonymous

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#76
"She said: "I was on the phone with him, he set the receiver down and did it."

He wanted to leave on top of his game

Anita Thompson, widow

Mrs Thompson said her husband had asked her to come home from a health club so they could work on his weekly column, but instead of saying goodbye, he shot himself."

what sort of action is this?.. conciouse mythmakeing in death? he was mucking about with a gun and made a mistake?... all very odd.
 

Anome

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#77
sidecar_jon said:
"She said: "I was on the phone with him, he set the receiver down and did it."

He wanted to leave on top of his game

Anita Thompson, widow

Mrs Thompson said her husband had asked her to come home from a health club so they could work on his weekly column, but instead of saying goodbye, he shot himself."

what sort of action is this?.. conciouse mythmakeing in death? he was mucking about with a gun and made a mistake?... all very odd.
That or a conspiracy by the establishment to keep him from telling all he knows. It's very weird, but hardly surprising for Thompson.
 
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#79
Emperor said:
quote]Polish Artist Beksinski Found Murdered - Police

Tue Feb 22,11:41 AM ET


WARSAW (Reuters) - Polish contemporary artist Zdzislaw Beksinski, famed for his haunting fantasy paintings, has been found murdered at his home, police said Tuesday.

Police said they found multiple wounds on Beksinski's body, discovered at his flat in a prestigious Warsaw neighborhood.....
Source
[/quote]

And they have arrested a couple of kids - seems so pointless:

Authorities charge two teenagers in death of famous Polish surrealist painter

WARSAW, Poland (AP) - Warsaw authorities charged two teenagers Friday in the stabbing death of surrealist painter Zdzislaw Beksinski. One suspect is the son of a longtime Beksinski friend and aide.

Beksinski, 75, considered one of Poland's leading contemporary artists, was found stabbed to death Monday at his Warsaw home. He was best known for his abstract renditions of skeletons, monster-like creatures and other apocalyptic images evoking death and decay.

A suspect identified as Robert K., 19, the son of a Beksinski friend and aide, was charged with murder, police said. A 16-year-old relative of the two men, Lukasz K., was charged with accessory to murder.

The 19-year-old confessed to killing the painter, prosecutor Zbigniew Zelaznicki said.

There were no signs of forced entry or robbery at the painter's home.

"We are moved by the senselessness and the ruthlessness of the crime," Ryszard Siewierski, Warsaw's chief inspector, said in announcing the charges.

A motive was not clear, although it appeared the 19-year-old suspect had tried to borrow money from Beksinski, Zelaznicki said.


---------------------
©2005 Associated Press.
Source
 

KeyserXSoze

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#80
http://www.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/Movies/03/07/obit.debra.hill.ap/index.html
'Halloween' writer-producer dead at 54
Debra Hill was pioneering woman producer
Monday, March 7, 2005 Posted: 1:37 PM EST (1837 GMT)

LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Debra Hill, who co-wrote the horror classic "Halloween" and was one of Hollywood's pioneering woman producers, died Monday, according to a family friend. She was 54.

The friend, Barbara Ligeti, said more information would be made available later Monday.

Hill's big break came in horror films when she and director John Carpenter co-wrote the genre's modern classic, "Halloween."

The 1979 film, also directed by Carpenter and produced by Hill, starred a 20-year-old Jamie Lee Curtis as the baby sitter terrorized by a murderous psychopath. Made on a modest $300,000 budget, it grossed $60 million worldwide, a record for an independent movie at the time, and launched a seemingly endless chain of sequels.

Hill, Carpenter and Curtis returned for "Halloween II," and Hill and Carpenter were involved in the writing of several later sequels, including "Halloween: Resurrection," "Halloween 5" and "Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers." A "Halloween 9," also written by Hill and Carpenter, is reported by the Internet Movie Database to be in production.

After her "Halloween" run, Hill joined her friend Lynda Obst in forming an independent production company in 1986 that made "Adventures in Babysitting" and "Heartbreak Hotel," both directed by Chris Columbus, and Terry Gilliam's "The Fisher King" with Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges.

In 1988 she entered a contract with Walt Disney Pictures under which she produced the feature "Gross Anatomy," short films for the Walt Disney theme park and an NBC special for Disneyland's 35th anniversary.

Films she produced included "The Dead Zone," 1983; "Head Office," 1985; and "Clue," 1986.

"Back when I started in 1974, there were very few women in the industry, and everybody called me 'Honey,' " she recalled in 2003. "I was assumed to be the makeup and hair person, or the script person. I was never assumed to be the writer or producer. I took a look around and realized there weren't many women, so I had to carve a niche for myself."

Carpenter praised her as "a real pioneer in this business."

"Unlike many producers, she came from the crew ranks. I think they're the most under-appreciated people, and they work the hardest," he said. "She had experienced the ins and the outs and had a thorough understanding of what it took to make a picture."

Hill began as a production assistant on adventure documentaries, working up to films as a script supervisor, a job that required sitting beside the director and keeping a record of each scene.

From there she landed jobs as assistant director and second-unit director and became associated with Carpenter, who was then a rising young director.

The two also collaborated on 1980's "The Fog" and 1981's "Escape From New York."

When she was honored by Women in Film in 2003, Hill said, "I hope some day there won't be a need for Women in Film. That it will be People in Film. That it will be equal pay, equal rights and equal job opportunities for everybody."

Born in Haddonfield, New Jersey, Hill grew up in Philadelphia.
 

Mighty_Emperor

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#81
I'm informed Bass Wolf, from the band Guitar Wolf (who have been touring recently and famously starred in the awesome "Wild Zero"), has died:

It's with deep saddest and regret that we post this latest Guitar Wolf news. Last night Billy, aka Bass Wolf, passed away, he was only 38 yrs old. The band just returned from their US tour, and fortunately Billy did get to spend time with his wife and children before going into the hospital. He died in his sleep sometime during the night. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family, Seiji and Toru.
No news I can find online yet (and their site seems down).
 

OneWingedBird

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#82
Geff Rushton of Coil passed away on 13 November last year, only just found out. The article from their website isn't too specific, word on the street is that he had a skinful and then fell down the stairs. Silly b*gger.


Jhonn Balance (aka John Balance and Geff Rushton) died at home on November 13 in a fall, leaving the music world and the wider world of magick without one of its most gifted and vivid voices.

He was born Geoffrey Laurence Burton on 16th February 1962 in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, later adopting the Rushton surname of his stepfather, and was educated at Lord Willliams School. He studied voice and vocal technique with Saral Bohm, wife of the physicist David Bohm. He was a member of 23 Skidoo, Psychic TV, Zos Kia, and Current 93, and in 1983 founded Coil with Throbbing Gristle cofounder Peter Christopherson. They embarked together on one of the most enduring and fruitful art/life partnerships in music.

Balance was a natural occultist from youth -- he has left amusing accounts of his intensive astral experiences while still a public schoolboy. He became a serious student of all occult literature, and drew on this in his music, artfully fusing esoterics with a succession of musical forms and styles over more than two decades. The imagery and symbolism of his lyrics were however entirely his own -- he never resorted to plundering the symbolic language of others, though he enjoyed occasional veiled references. His output is all the more rich for his originality, making him a primary source in his own right, with passionate fans among occultists and pagans of all persuasions. His vocal technique was relentlessly experimental -- where many singers settle on a signature style and vocal range, he continually pushed the limits of expression to find fresh outlets for his visions.

The output of Coil ranges from the avant-garde (including soundtracks for experimental filmmaker Derek Jarman), to acerbic reflections of passing trends in popular music (such as the brilliantly sardonic Love¹s Secret Domain album), to experimental neoclassical and folk (as with the Solstice/Equinox series), to extended excursions into pure electronica (like the recent Musick to Play in the Dark albums). Many bands and composers have cited Coil as an influence. Balance frequently collaborated with others, as guest artist, remixer and producer. Commissioned work by Coil includes a soundtrack for Clive Barker¹s Hellraiser (rejected by the studio as too frightening), and important remixes of Nine Inch Nails (see the title sequence music for the film Seven, and the album Further Down the Spiral).

After an initial appearance in Berlin in 1983, Coil was a studio group until they premiered a sophisticated live show at London¹s Royal Festival Hall in 2000, commencing a highly successful series of tours that tested and proved Balance's abilities as a performer. Balance was a gifted writer whose work remains to be collected and published. A connoisseur of all things strange and beautiful, over the years he and Peter Christopherson built the important Threshold House collection of Austin Osman Spare and Aleister Crowley artworks, often loaning paintings to shows.

Balance struggled all his life with the twin diseases of depression and alcoholism -- the latter contributed to his accidental death -- but he drew on this pain as well as his great joy in living to produce art that was all the more true, immediate and poignantly relevant. An account of his life and work is David Keenan's "England's Hidden Reverse: The Secret History of the Esoteric Underground" (London: SAF Publishing, 2003).

A man of immense talent, learning, charm and generosity, he is survived by his ex-partner and lifelong collaborator Peter Christopherson, and his partner, the artist Ian Johnstone.
 

MrRING

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#84
From todays Sci Fi Wire:

Frank Gorshin, the impressionist best known for his Emmy-nominated role as the Riddler on the Batman TV series, died May 17 at the age of 72, the Associated Press reported.
 
A

Anonymous

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#85
Ed Bishop, who played a Hawaii CapCom space tracker in the 1967 James Bond film "You Only Live Twice" and Klaus Hergersheimer in 1973's "Diamonds Are Forever", died on the morning of Wednesday, June 8th, just three days shy of his 73rd birthday. He is believed to have contracted a fatal virus while undergoing hospital treatment, but the exact cause of death is currently under investigation - reports Fanderson.

Ed Bishop was born George Victor Bishop at the Shore Road Hospital in Brooklyn on June 11th, 1932, the son of a banker who had high hopes that Ed would adopt the same career in later life. In 1939, the family moved from Brooklyn to the small town of Peekskill, 42 miles outside New York, where Ed graduated from Peekskill High School in 1950. He then attended Courtland State Teachers' College in Courtland, New York but was dismissed after just six months for "failing to maintain a proper academic standing".

Ed entered National Service in the United States Army in 1952, serving with the Armed Forces Radio Service at St. John's, Newfoundland, working as an announcer and disc jockey presenting hillbilly and western music on Station VOUS. It was here that Ed had his first acting experience, when he joined the local amateur theatrical company, the St. John's Players. Discharged from the Army in 1954, he went to work for Remington Rand Incorporated in Buffalo, New York, and then attended Boston University to study Business Administration in preparation for a career in banking, but he very quickly realised that he had no interest in pursuing this line of work.

In 1956, against his parents' wishes, he enrolled in a two-year course in drama with the Theatre Division at Boston University, graduating in 1959 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in the Theatre. He then won a United States Fulbright Grant to continue his acting studies at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA) in England. Changing his name to Ed Bishop for professional purposes, he had intended to return to America after his LAMDA training, but found himself being offered so many roles in television and theatre productions that he decided to stay on in London.

Ed's professional career began on April 14th, 1961 when he appeared in an episode of Granada Television's Drama 61, entitled Edge Of Truth. Three months later he landed a part as an American sailor in Look Homeward, Angel at the Pembroke Theatre, Croydon, and from there he went straight into the West End production of Bye Bye Birdie as an understudy to Peter Marshall. At this time, he made his feature film debut with a minor role in Stanley Kubrick's Lolita (1961), closely followed by another small part in Philip Leacock's The War Lover (1962).

More stage work followed: as an American Indian in Little Mary Sunshine and then reprising his role in Look Homeward, Angel in the West End. He returned to America to make his Broadway debut as an Englishman in David Merrick's prestigious production of The Rehearsal with Coral Browne and Alan Badel, and this was followed six months later by a role in Man And Superman, first in Boston and then back in London in 1964.

In the mid-Sixties, Ed decided to pay more attention to his film career, appearing as an astronaut in The Mouse In The Moon (1963), a space tracker in You Only Live Twice (1967), and an army intelligence officer investigating covert Chinese activity in Battle Beneath The Earth (1968). In the spring of 1966, he also appeared in a small role as the Aries-1B pilot in Stanley Kubrick's epic 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), shot at the MGM British Studios. As originally filmed this was a much larger part, but in Kubrick's final edit most of Ed's work ended up on the cutting room floor - in the finished picture he is only seen briefly in a scene with William Sylvester, and has no audible dialogue.

Ed was also appearing regularly on television at this time, making guest appearances in The Saint (four times), The Baron, Court Martial and Man In A Suitcase. In the theatre, he attracted considerable attention from critics for his portrayal of John Kennedy in Joan Littlewood's production of MacBird, and went on to co-star with Shirley Knight in And People All Around at the Bristol Old Vic.

Then, in 1967, Ed first came into contact with Gerry and Sylvia Anderson when he was cast as the voice of Captain Blue in Captain Scarlet And The Mysterons. He was heard in all 32 episodes of the popular Supermarionation series, as well as in a series of original Captain Scarlet stories recorded for release on the Century 21 Records label. The Andersons were keen to work with Bishop again and the following year, they cast him in Doppelgänger (1969) as a late replacement for Peter Dyneley in the role of NASA liaison David Poulson.

An appearance in the BBC's Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, a starring role in an episode of Out Of The Unknown and a guest part in Strange Report followed before the call came from the Andersons inviting him to star as Ed Straker in all 26 episodes of UFO. After filming on UFO was completed, Ed appeared in the James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever (1971), guested in The Adventurer and was then employed by Gerry Anderson for a guest appearance as the deranged Colonel John Hunter in The First Circle, an episode of The Protectors.

In 1972, a short foray to Los Angeles to test the waters on his native soil landed Ed a vocal role in the animated Star Trek series and a major part in the movie Pets (1972), but he soon realised that in America he was regarded as just another American actor, one of thousands all competing for the same roles. He returned to England where he found himself much in demand for guest roles in episodes of series such as Colditz, Orson Welles' Great Mysteries, Warship, Thriller, Oil Strike North, Quiller and The Cedar Tree. He also narrated Jay Williams's The Hawkstone on Jackanory and recorded two vocal roles for Gerry Anderson: as the narrator of The Day After Tomorrow and the voice of one of the puppet characters in Alien Attack, a commercial for Jif Dessert Toppings.

Over the last 25 years, Ed had continued to work extensively in film, television, radio and theatre. He appeared in the feature films Brass Target (1978), SOS Titanic (1979), Saturn 3 (1980), Silver Dream Racer (1980) and The Lords Of Discipline (1983), and was seen on television in instalments of 1990, It Ain't Half Hot Mum, Breakaway, The Professionals (twice), Wilde Alliance, Dick Turpin, The Mad Death, Chocky's Children, The Two Ronnies, French & Saunders and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles. He also appeared as astronaut Jim Lovell in Houston, We've Got A Problem, one of the dramatised reconstructions of real-life events in the BBC's Life At Stake series, and as the motor-mouth TV anchorman Jay Garrick in all six episodes of the cult LWT sitcom Whoops Apocalypse!

Among many other single dramas for BBC Radio 4, Ed starred as Detective Elijah Bailey in an adaptation of Isaac Asimov's The Caves Of Steel, portrayed Philip Marlowe in a series of six adaptations of Raymond Chandler's classic detective novels, and had a recurring role as American tourist Al Clancy in The Archers. His distinctive voice was also heard regularly on commercial television extolling the virtues of products such as Nescafé coffee, Cadbury's Wispa chocolate, Clearasil cleansing lotion and Labatt's lager, while his stage appearances included productions of Deathtrap, Feiffer's America, Waiting For Lefty, Imagine Drowning, Fool For Love and the UK premieres of Arthur Miller's The Archbishop's Ceiling, The Man Who Had All The Luck and Broken Glass.

More recently, he co-starred with Angela Lansbury in the television pilot film The Unexpected Mrs. Pollifax, guested in episodes of Highlander and The Demon Headmaster, and appeared as an FBI agent in an episode of the BBC's Waking The Dead. He also co-starred in Big Finish's Doctor Who Unbound audio drama Full Fathom Five, playing the ruthless (and monstrous) General Flint.

Ed Bishop died on the morning of Wednesday, June 8th, 2005, aged 72. He leaves his wife Jane and three daughters - Georgina, Jessica and Serina - by his first wife, Hillary Preen. His son Daniel predeceased him.



http://www.mi6.co.uk/news/index.php?itemid=2490&catid=3
 

stu neville

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#87
This is a bit sad :(.
World's oldest married man dies

The world's oldest married man has died at the age of 105.
Percy Arrowsmith and his wife Florence, 100, made it into the Guinness Book of Records after celebrating their 80th wedding anniversary on 1 June.

The couple, from Hereford, also held the record for being the oldest married couple in the world.

Mr Arrowsmith died peacefully at his home on Wednesday morning. The Bishop of Hereford expressed his sorrow at the news and paid tribute to Mr Arrowsmith.

The Rt Revd Anthony Priddis, who visited the couple on their anniversary, said: "Percy and Flo were very happy when I saw them on their anniversary.

"They were still very much in love with each other. They have been churchgoers all their life and I am sure the family will find comfort in their Christian faith."

He added: "We will all be praying for Flo and the family in their grief."

When interviewed earlier this month, Mrs Arrowsmith said she felt very lucky that she and her husband were still together.
source
 

lopaka

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#88
Wrong thread to ask, but anybody here seen Zombies on Broadway? Emps, your Revenant chums. perhaps?

1950s cult film actor Robert Clarke dies

Friday, June 17, 2005

By The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Robert I. Clarke, an actor best known for his roles in 1950s cult films such as "The Man from Planet X" and "The Astounding She-Monster," died Saturday at his Valley Village home, the Los Angeles Times reported. He was 85.

While best known for his roles in horror and monster films, Mr. Clarke also appeared in dozens of television programs, including "The King Family Show." Mr. Clarke also appeared in more than 85 movies, including "The Incredible Petrified World" and "Sun Demon," the last of which he wrote and produced.

Born June 1, 1920, in Oklahoma City, Mr. Clarke planned a career in the military until asthma kept him out of World War II. He attended the University of Oklahoma and then the University of Wisconsin, where he began acting.

He moved to Hollywood in 1942 and landed a contract with RKO. By 1950 he had done small roles in about 40 motion pictures, including his first horror films, "The Body Snatcher," starring Boris Karloff, and "Zombies on Broadway," starring Bela Lugosi.

© 2005 Associated Press
http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown ... 716nd5.htm
 

MrRING

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#89
I've only seen it referenced in books.... and trusty IMDB. I was reading about it last night in a strange coincidence and apparently it was made due to the popularity of I Walked With A Zombie, and it featured some of the same zombie cast.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0038270/
 

lopaka

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#90
Nothing so strange about two men in their 80's dying... but both of these items are on CNN's front page this morning:

Voice of Winnie the Pooh's Tigger dies

Monday, June 27, 2005; Posted: 10:06 a.m. EDT (14:06 GMT)

LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Paul Winchell, a ventriloquist, inventor and children's TV show host best known for creating the lispy voice of Winnie the Pooh's animated friend Tigger, has died. He was 82.

Winchell died Friday morning in his sleep at his Moorpark home, Burt Du Brow, a television producer and close family friend, told the Los Angeles Times.

Over six decades, Winchell was a master ventriloquist -- bringing dummies Jerry Mahoney and Knucklehead Smiff to life on television -- and an inventor who held 30 patents, including one for an early artificial heart he built in 1963.

But he was perhaps best known for his work as the voice of the lovable tiger in animated versions of A.A. Milne's "Winnie the Pooh" -- with his trademark "T-I-double grrrr-R."

Winchell first voiced Tigger in 1968 for Disney's "Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day," which won an Academy Award for best animated short film, and continued to do so through 1999's "Winnie the Pooh: Seasons of Giving."


Winchell voiced memorable characters in numerous animated features over the years for Disney and Hanna Barbera. He was Gargamel in "The Smurfs," and Boomer in "The Fox and the Hound."

Winchell said he always tried to look for characteristics and idiosyncrasies in the voices he created. For Tigger, he created a slight lisp and a laugh. He credited his wife, who is British, for giving him the inspiration for Tigger's signature phrase: TTFN. TA-TA for now.

In 1974, he earned a Grammy for best children's recording with "The Most Wonderful Things About Tiggers" from the feature "Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too."

Winchell was born in New York City on December 21, 1922. He contracted polio at age six and overcame speech impediments as he learned to throw his own voice.

Winchell attended Columbia University and also studied and practiced acupuncture and hypnosis and became a prolific inventor.

He donated his early artificial heart to the University of Utah for research. Dr. Robert Jarvik and other researchers at the university went on to build an artificial heart, dubbed the Jarvik-7, which was implanted into patients after 1982.

Among Winchell's other patents: a disposable razor, a flameless cigarette lighter and an invisible garter belt.

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/Movies/ ... index.html

John Fiedler, voice of Piglet, dies

Monday, June 27, 2005; Posted: 8:02 a.m. EDT (12:02 GMT)

NEW YORK (AP) -- John Fiedler, a stage actor who won fame as the voice of Piglet in Walt Disney's Winnie-the-Pooh films, died Saturday, The New York Times reported in Monday editions. He was 80.

Fiedler served in the Navy during World War II before beginning a stage career in New York. He performed in supporting roles alongside Sidney Poitier on Broadway, John Wayne in Hollywood and Bob Newhart on television.

With Newhart, on "The Bob Newhart Show," he was Mr. Peterson, the meek patient who was often a target for Jack Riley's sarcastic Mr. Carlin.

Fiedler also appeared in the films "12 Angry Men," "The Odd Couple," "True Grit," "The Fortune" and "Sharky's Machine," and was a cast member on the TV show "Buffalo Bill."

But he was best known for the squeaky voice of the ever-worrying Piglet that he landed when someone noticed his naturally high-pitched voice.

"Walt Disney heard it on a program and said, 'That's Piglet,' " his brother James Fiedler told The Times.

In addition to his brother, Fiedler is survived by a sister, Mary Dean, The Times reported. The newspaper did not report the cause or location of his death.

Copyright 2005 The Associated Press.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/TV/06/2 ... index.html
 
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