The R.I.P. Thread

Bigphoot2

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Opera legend Pavarotti dies at 71
Italian tenor Luciano Pavarotti has died, his manager has announced.
The singer, who was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year, died at his home in the northern city of Modena, at the age of 71.

He had been admitted to hospital there with a fever on 8 August. He was released two weeks later following diagnostic tests.

Pavarotti had cancer surgery in July 2006 in New York, and had not made any public appearances since then.

He last sang in public in early 2006, when he performed his signature Puccini aria Nessun Dorma at the opening of the Winter Olympics in Turin.

He had undergone five bouts of chemotherapy in the past year.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/6981032.stm
 

rynner2

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Pavarotti stories are all over the net.

But I found it slightly spooky that he died on the 10th anniversary of Princess Di's funeral. He was a great friend of hers, and had been asked to sing at the funeral, but he was 'too upset'.


Luciano Pavarotti is supported by two women. One of whom is his 23 year-old girlfriend Nicoletta. He was asked whether he wanted to sing to Diana's honour. But Pavarotti declined as he couldn't trust his emotions. His pain was so strong.

http://www.princess-diana.com/diana/burial.htm


There are humourous aspects too:

True Story!
PapaGuinea 06 Sep 2007 20:44

It was the day of Princess Di's funeral and one of my friends, together with his family, (mum, dad, aunts, uncles, cousins and elderly granny) were all sat together around the TV watching the solemn procession of guests beginning to arrive for the funeral service. All of a sudden Granny became extremely agitated, crying out and becoming very alarmed. "What's the matter Granny" they all enquired, "what is it that's wrong". Granny shouted the more "It's the murderer, he's coming into the church". No one understood what she meant. "Who" they cried out, "who do you mean, the murderer"? "Look, there he is" said Granny (pointing to the heavyweight Pavarotti arriving) "its Paparazzi, he killed her".

Can you imagine the laughter that followed on the realisation of Granny's mistake?

And...

Out of the mouths etc
Posted by hi mum at 20:15 on 06 Sep 2007

One lad said to me today in school. 'That Pepperami's dead then, Miss'.

Both stories here:
http://my.telegraph.co.uk/hi_mum/septem ... hs_etc.htm
 

JamesWhitehead

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In two months time it will be half a century since the death of Gigli. Google his name today and the first page of results - bar one - is given over to a 2003 movie which is regarded universally as a stinker. Ho hum, you get used to Googling Beethoven minus Dog.

In his day, Beniamino Gigli was celebrated as the most beautiful tenor voice on record and deplored as one of the most vulgar. His ego and appetite were immense but Fat Lucy seemed to trump both.

What is slightly different is that Gigli was one of those artists who drew a vast and democratic audience into his core repetoire. Yes, there were always plenty of Neapolitan songs and kitsch at his recitals and they traditionally began with those dubious Arie Antiche but the bulk of the time was given over to Bellini, Donizetti, Verdi and Puccini. Purple patches, maybe, but they seemed to whet appetites then and the crowds which flocked to see him in Italian amphitheatrical spectacles after the war, were left curious about the complete operas he sang in. He went on too long, gave too many farewells but the affection people felt was for an artist who had opened doors for them.

Fast forward to Fat Lucy and you find his audience consisted increasingly of the kind of people who thought he was fabulous, regardless of how he sang. He was a sort of musical Shirley Bassey. People seemed content to have seen him and heard him, since he so amply rewarded their appetite for celebrity and their own pathetic desires for an "upmarket" experience without too much effort.

Both thick and greedy, Gigli and Pavarotti had God-given voices and the difference in their legacy of fans is probably just a question of culture and generations.

In between there was di Stefano, a voice - if voice in itself was ever enough - that some think the greatest of all. It was horribly misused and only a few discs from the forties suggest his supporters could be right. But the old joke that Bel Canto became Can Belto as he moved into the fifties is horribly accurate.

The next generation had their prize tenor too and you can still be cornered by fans who assure you he was the best. Just a film star, essentially, Mario Lanza caught the imagination of a sort of Pavarotti audience. They saw him star as The Great Caruso in the early fifties and believed the hype. Even HMV put out his records on their expensive red label in the dying days of the 78s. It's still a nightmare for collectors to spot a box of red labels in the saleroom and discover they are all Lanza and Crookes! Could he Belt it? Yes he could! Though he was never on the stage of an opera house and died of obesity-related issues in the same decade he rose to fame.

Pavarotti was a damned good Nemorino once but died as an artist a long, long time ago. RIP. :(
 

rynner2

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Don't be such a sourpuss, James!

I vaguely remember Gigli (and Mario Lanza). They all did their their own thing, in their own times. Let's just take it as it is (or was).

Pavarotti was one of the 'three tenors' (and the others weren't Gigli and Lanza..!)

Today we celebrate the life of one of these three -

Pavarotti, a great entertainer.

Such people are unique, and comparisons with others, past or present, are really meaningless. If he brought joy, and fun, into this dismal world for a few years, we should rejoice that we knew him, even if if it was only at long range, courtesy of modern electronics.
 

Rrose_Selavy

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or "that gorilla" as I think Jonathan Miller once aptly called him.

Opera - the most absurd of the arts -

-
 

rynner2

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Rrose_Selavy said:
Opera - the most absurd of the arts
Todays Matt cartoon shows some toffs leaving the Royal Opera House, and passing a placard announcing Pavarotti's death.

One bejeweled lady says:

"He brought opera to the masses

- I'll never forgive him for that!"


:D :D :D
 

maureenmac1

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Dame Anita Roddick dies aged 64
Founder of the Body Shop Dame Anita Roddick has died at the age of 64.
Her family said in a statement that she suffered "a major brain haemorrhage" at 1830 BST at St Richard's Hospital in Chichester, West Sussex.

Her husband, Gordon, and daughters Sam and Justine were all with her, the statement added.

Dame Anita set up the first Body Shop in Brighton in 1976. In February, she announced she had contracted Hepatitis C from a blood transfusion in 1971.

The family's statement said: "Gordon, Justine and Sam Roddick are very sad to announce that, after suffering a major brain haemorrhage, Anita Roddick died at 6.30pm this evening at the age of 64.

"Anita Roddick was admitted to St Richard's Hospital in Chichester, close to her home, yesterday evening when she collapsed after complaining of a sudden headache.

"Mrs Roddick was admitted to the hospital's intensive care unit and her husband Gordon and two daughters, Sam and Justine, were with her when she died."

'Own mortality'

Dame Anita revealed she was suffering from cirrhosis of the liver after contracting Hepatitis C from blood given during the birth of her youngest daughter, Sam.

She said she had unknowingly lived with the virus for three decades and only found out about it two years ago after a blood test.

"What I can say is that having Hep C means that I live with a sharp sense of my own mortality, which in many ways makes life more vivid and immediate," Dame Anita said.

"It makes me even more determined to just get on with things."

Dame Anita also called for Hepatitis C - sometimes called the "silent killer" - to be taken more seriously as a "public health challenge".

The Body Shop became part of the French company L'Oreal Group in July 2006 but is run independently.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/uk/6988343.stm

Published: 2007/09/10 20:07:33 GMT

© BBC MMVII
 

GNC

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/gla ... 997134.stm

Rally driver feared dead in crash

Former world rally champion Colin McRae is believed to have been killed along with three others in a helicopter crash near his home in Lanarkshire.

The helicopter, which police believe was owned by Mr McRae, 39, came down on Saturday afternoon in Jerviswood, about a mile from Lanark, and caught fire.

Strathclyde Police said Colin McRae, a keen pilot, is thought to have been on board with three others.

However formal identification of those killed still has to be carried out.

Strathclyde Police said the damage to the Squirrel aircraft was so bad it was initially unclear how many people had died.

A police statement said: "Around 1610 BST on Saturday, 15 September 2007, emergency services were called to a helicopter crash in Jerviswood, east of the A73 at Lanark.

"There are no survivors."

The Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) has been informed and will carry out a full inquiry.

Police have been conducting a full scene examination and area search.

The Scottish Ambulance Service confirmed that its own helicopter had been despatched to the scene along with three ambulance crews, and the Strathclyde Fire and Rescue Service was in attendance.

An RAF helicopter was also put on stand-by to assist.

A spokesman for the British Airports Authority said the helicopter did not come from Glasgow or Edinburgh Airports, but its flight path is still unknown.

Colin McRae won the World Rally Championship drivers' title in 1995 driving a Subaru, becoming the first Briton to win the title.

He was also runner-up in 1996, 1997 and 2001.

He is married to Alison and has two children, Hollie and Johnny.
A real shame. Helicopters are a lot more dangerous than people think.
 

Ringo

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RIP Colin & Johnny McRae. A friend and another child died too but I don't know their names.
 

Peripart

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So that's the two best British rally drivers of the last 20 years, both dead at a terribly early age. Richard Burns and Colin McRae, although quite different, both gave British fans someone to root for, and brought the sport to a much wider audience.

Whilst TV and radio will always have whole days of breast-beating and false tears over the death of a "hero" like George Best, who was a great talent but a deeply flawed man who pissed his life away, the passing of Colin McRae, who achieved more in his short life than most people could dream of, will be all but forgotten by most in a few days' time. He was a proper hero, a man of action who was prepared, quite literally, to put his life on the line every time he competed.

It's an odd twist of fate to think that, to many, he will be remembered longest because of the computer games that bear his name. Maybe, if just a few people from the Playstation generation pause to think about who the real McRae was and what he achieved, that will be something. He doesn't need false wailing and gnashing of teeth. He wouldn't have wanted the fuss. A great man indeed.
 

escargot

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MArcel Marceau dies

Marcel Marceau has died at the age of 84, the AFP news agency has reported.
The performer was known around the world for his silent portrayal of a white-faced clown with battered hat.

Born in Strasbourg in 1923, Marceau was inspired by silent era actors like Charlie Chaplin, and studied under mime master Etienne Decroux in Paris.

His character Bip, the white-faced clown in striped pullover and hat, made his first appearance in 1947.
*counts down to first appearance of wag doing 'Marcel Marceau in glass-topped coffin' mime*
 

GNC

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[Walks into room as if in a high wind, picks up telephone]

Monstrosa said:
Will there be a minute's yelling at the funeral?
"NON!"
 

WhistlingJack

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Lois Maxwell

Bond star Lois Maxwell dies at 80



Actress Lois Maxwell, who starred as Miss Moneypenny in a string of James Bond movies, has died aged 80.

Maxwell starred alongside Sean Connery in Bond's first movie outing, Dr No, in 1962.

She played the role until 1985's A View To A Kill with Roger Moore, who told the BBC she had been a "great asset" to the early Bond movies.

A spokesperson for Fremantle Hospital, Western Australia, said she died there on Saturday evening.

Maxwell starred in 14 Bond films as the secretary to M, the secret agent's boss and head of the secret service.

She appeared in more movies than any of the actors who played the lead role in the spy series, including Sean Connery and Roger Moore.

"It's rather a shock," Moore, who had known her since they were students at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (Rada) in 1944, told BBC Radio 5 Live.

"She was always fun and she was wonderful to be with."

Born Lois Hooker in Ontario, Canada, in 1927, her acting career started in radio, before she moved to the UK with the Entertainment Corps of the Canadian army at the age of 15.

In the late 1940s, she moved to Hollywood and picked up a best newcomer Golden Globe for her part in Shirley Temple comedy That Hagen Girl.

After a spell working in Italy, she returned to the UK in the mid-1950s.

As well as her 14 outings as Miss Moneypenny, she also appeared in Stanley Kubrick's Lolita and worked on TV shows including The Saint, The Baron, Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), The Persuaders! and Department S.

Her last film role was in the 2001 thriller The Fourth Angel.

Story from BBC NEWS:

Published: 2007/09/30 10:35:03 GMT

© BBC MMVII
 

rynner2

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Entertainer Sherrin dies aged 76

Broadcaster and writer Ned Sherrin has died from throat cancer, aged 76.
Sherrin rose to fame in the early 1960s as the man who devised That Was The Week That Was, the ground-breaking satirical BBC television show.

He went on to write, produce and direct for stage and screen and presented BBC Radio 4's Loose Ends for 20 years.

BBC director general Mark Thompson said Sherrin, who died at home in Chelsea, south-west London, would be remembered with "affection and gratitude".

"I am deeply saddened by the news of the death of Ned Sherrin," Mr Thompson said.

"Through his brilliant early work, Ned was a trailblazer who paved the way for the sophisticated modern comedy satire shows that are so much loved by audiences today.

"His contribution across decades made him one of Britain's best-loved voices."

Mr Thompson added: "The entertainment industry owes Ned Sherrin a huge debt and he will be remembered with enormous affection and gratitude by the BBC and by countless millions of viewers and listeners."

Farming background

Sherrin was born into a farming family in Somerset in 1931 and became involved in the theatre whilst reading law at Oxford University.

He was called to the bar in 1955 but a fortuitous meeting with a floor manager from the TV revue the next day led him to a job at ATV.

Two years later, he moved to the BBC where he directed the Tonight programme and later a range of variety shows, panel games and musicals.

His work in broadcasting, theatre and film, saw him fulfil roles as an actor, producer, director, author and presenter.

He hosted Loose Ends, a weekly show of comedy, talk and music from its beginning in 1986, but was forced to step down in December 2006 after cancer was diagnosed.

Sherrin also presented the music quiz Counterpoint on BBC Radio 4, which he once described as "the most entertaining revision course in popular and classical music that I could imagine".

He was awarded a CBE in the 1997 New Year's Honours list.

His manager Deke Arlon said Sherrin had died with friends and his doctor at his bedside on Monday.

He added that he was "one of the great bon viveurs of the world, with a tremendous ability to enjoy".

Mark Damazer, controller of Radio 4, said: "Ned brought to Radio 4 a fabulous cocktail of wit, zest, curiosity and mischief - all based on an extraordinary knowledge of stage, screen and writing.

"He was an impresario as well as a great raconteur. He was a natural broadcaster - and got the best out of others. He sparkled and made us all smile and laugh.

"And for all his fame - he was considerate and kind. He will be hugely missed."


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7023129.stm
 

Yithian

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I used to listen to him on both Loose Ends & Counterpoint and worried that it was age/health problems that caused several absences is later years. He was a really good speaker, funny but erudite and he'd lighten my mood. The old guard is changing. RIP
 

JamesWhitehead

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A few months back, I heard Sherrin interviewed in the course of a radio documentary - I forget what the subject was. His voice was already so faint that it seemed to come from the other side so the news of his demise was expected, sadly. I had not heard it was throat cancer but that fits. RIP. :(
 

GNC

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7023501.stm

Theme tune writer Hazlehurst dies

Ronnie Hazlehurst, who wrote the theme tunes for television shows such as Blankety Blank and Last of the Summer Wine, has died aged 79.

A former musical director at the BBC, he was closely involved with the Eurovision Song Contest and conducted the UK entry on seven occasions.

He died in hospital in Guernsey after suffering a stroke last week.

Broadcaster Michael Parkinson called the Manchester-born composer "a marvellous and talented musician".

"He was also a funny north country man with a great sense of humour," he said.

"When I was at the BBC, I did a series of specials with him. He was one of the great unsung heroes on the music business - and a great professional."

Hazlehurst's partner Jean Fitzgerald said: "He was just a perfectionist in his profession and a very kind and generous man."
A bit of a TV legend in his modest way. The Are You Being Served theme was way ahead of its time. Yes, he invented rap and sampling!
 

WhistlingJack

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The Are You Being Served? theme is indeed extraordinary, but he was very much a man of his time - infamously, Hazlehurst wrote the original theme for Only Fools and Horses which was so rubbish that John Sullivan himself thought, "I could do better", and he did.
 
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An uncompromising Republican has passed on. At least he put his money where his mouth was :
He refused the state pension because he regarded the Government as fundamentally illegitimate and later refused the €2,500 centenarians award over President Mary McAleese’s increasingly close relations with the British royal family.


Ireland's oldest man dies aged 10503/10/2007 - 11:57:16

One of the last survivors of the War of Independence and Ireland's oldest man has died after a short illness.

Dan Keating, a 105-year-old Kerryman and unrepentant Republican, fell ill last month and was treated in hospital for several weeks but never fully recovered.

He died yesterday in Kerry.

Born in Castlemaine in January 1902, he joined youth movement Na Fianna aged 16 and fought in the War of Independence against the Black and Tans and later against the Free State forces in the Civil War.

Keating, an IRA rifleman, was involved in two major attacks on British auxiliaries, at Castlemaine and Castleisland, where up to twelve Black and Tans troops were killed.

He was interned a number of times in the Curragh Camp in Co Kildare in the 1920s.

He became patron of hard-line movement Republican Sinn Féin in 2002 and party president Ruairi O’Bradaigh described him as an inspiration.

“One of the last, if not the last IRA veteran of the Black and Tan war, he was Patron of Republican Sinn Fein to the very day of his death and an inspiration to all true Republicans,” Mr O’Bradaigh said.

Keating remained steadfast in his hard-line views throughout his life.

He refused the state pension because he regarded the Government as fundamentally illegitimate and later refused the €2,500 centenarians award over President Mary McAleese’s increasingly close relations with the British royal family.

He also refused to watch his beloved Kerry in the All-Ireland final in 2006 after the GAA lifted its controversial Rule 42 and opened Croke Park to soccer and rugby.

Keating was among a 250-strong group of former IRA prisoners who took out a full page newspaper advert in March this year urging people not to vote for Sinn Féin over the party’s support for the Police Service of Northern Ireland.

“Dan Keating was a fine Republican who was an inspiration to many generations of Irish people who long to see a united Ireland,” Mr Long said.

Before his death he gave a moving recollection of the execution of Republican Tony Gibson from Co Laois.

“I was in Portlaoise at the time and was sick in hospital. I was looking out the window when this man was being executed,” Keating said.

“There were five men in the firing squad. He was only wounded and a man went up and fired two shots into his head.”

http://www.breakingnews.ie/print/?jp=mhmhaueyidgb
 

GNC

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7051206.stm

British actress Kerr dies at 86

British actress Deborah Kerr, known to millions for her roles in The King And I, Black Narcissus and From Here To Eternity, has died at the age of 86.

Born in Scotland in 1921, the actress made her name in British films before becoming successful in Hollywood.

Nominated for the best actress Oscar six times, she was given an honorary award by the Academy in 1994.

Kerr, who had suffered from Parkinson's disease for a number of years, died in Suffolk on Tuesday, her agent said.

The actress, who was made a CBE in 1997, had lived in Switzerland but returned to England to be near her family when her illness worsened.

She leaves a husband, the novelist and screenwriter Peter Viertel, two daughters and three grandchildren.

Kerr began her career in regional British theatres and entertained the troops during World War II.

Her first major screen role came in 1941's Major Barbara, while her last came in 1985's The Assam Garden.

Between them she appeared alongside such Hollywood icons as Burt Lancaster, Cary Grant and Robert Mitchum.

Notable British films include The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, in which she played three roles, and Black Narcissus, which saw as a nun in the Himalayas.

She remains best known, however, for her torrid sex scene with Lancaster in From Here to Eternity and for dancing with Yul Brynner in The King and I.

From the late 1960s onwards she concentrated on theatre and television roles.

Kerr always played down her success, attributing it to her having had "an awful lot of luck".

Her honorary Oscar came in recognition of "an artist of impeccable grace and beauty, a dedicated actress whose motion picture career has always stood for perfection, discipline and elegance".

"I must confess, I've had a marvellous time," she said as she collected the statuette.
Sorry to see her go, I always liked her, especially in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.
 

JamesWhitehead

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RIP Deborah Kerr. Her Filmography is here:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000039/

I don't know that many of her films: Love on the Dole, Major Barbara, Blimp, Black Narcissus, Separate Tables. I last saw her a few weeks back in the last.

She played a character called Sybil. That and the small private hotel setting suggests it was the model for Fawlty Towers, though Ms Kerr played a timid and suppressed young woman whose sexual development was prevented by her termagent mother.

Films to see again include The Innocents - available in a fine but pricey bfi DVD.

One curio to try and see: Eye of the Devil, 1966, an oddity whose plot strongly prefigures The Wicker Man. Anyone ever seen this? :?:
 
A

Anonymous

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Yeah. Heard that this morning. Gutted. Him and Linda. The News Quiz is running on empty. I am getting old.

Didn't he ask his agent why his books didn't sell?
 
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