The Second World War / World War Two

Yithian

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Ringo and I have made an excellent start on researching his grandfather (mentioned on page 5 of this thread). We've managed to get a few of his movements in Belgium and France in 1939-40 and have turned up a photograph of his whole Royal Engineer Field Company just before the sailed to France. Lots of new leads lined up for the New Year, too. It looks as if he played with and repaired very big machines at home and in Europe and blew stuff up while the BEF was in retreat.
 

George_millett

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Cross posting from the AFV thread as it is also relevant here.
Was just having a poke around some of the channels I subscribed to and it appears that the team behind The Great War have agreed to do something similar for WW2, except that it is going to be something even bigger. Potentially bringing in 8 different You tube channels that cover relevant area like the development of small arms, aircraft and tanks in addition to the standard weekly run through of events that happened that week and biographies of important individuals in the war.
 

maximus otter

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My ...Granddad was drafted into the Bomber squadrons...
My dad's case was different: Being from Ulster, he wasn't liable for conscription, but he and many of his mates volunteered. As a reward for stepping forward they were given the choice of either Home service or overseas service. All of my dad's mates thought they were being clever and getting the best of both worlds when they put their names down for Home service. My dad, being a backstreet boy from Belfast with limited prospects, thought he fancied seeing a bit of the world and put his name down for foreign parts.

He was posted to Transport Command as a WOp/AG (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner or "Wop Ay Gee") and had a lovely war.

His mates were sent to Bomber Command and were cut down like corn before a scythe.

maximus otter
 

Yithian

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George_millett

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Inrange
Has also signed up to help out
PH_O2cCLIGc

To give a more practical idea of how the guns work and how they are used.

C&R Arsenal are also involved doing the more documentary style of program for each of the weapons used similar to what they are doing now for the Great War Channel.
 

Ringo

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Ringo and I have made an excellent start on researching his grandfather (mentioned on page 5 of this thread). We've managed to get a few of his movements in Belgium and France in 1939-40 and have turned up a photograph of his whole Royal Engineer Field Company just before the sailed to France. Lots of new leads lined up for the New Year, too. It looks as if he played with and repaired very big machines at home and in Europe and blew stuff up while the BEF was in retreat.
Yes we have. I have so much to read through now but I have traced two weeks worth of manoeuvres just before the Dunkirk evacuation. They were blowing up bridges in Belgium to slow down the German advance as they retreated towards De Panne. And they also built makeshift piers on the beaches out of abandoned trucks and vehicles, to help the troops evacuate.
 

skinny

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Watched Dunkirk last night. Outstanding work, Mr Nolan. Brings it down to the level of family, which is where war really happens.
 

Yithian

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Yithian

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I've just been reading the War Diaries for 2nd Battalion the Duke of Welligton's Regiment (2nd Dukes) for 1942: their experiences during the Sittang Disaster. It's incredible stuff--utter chaos--and the remnants of the battalion that managed to swim the river under fire, dehydrated after days without food and and then retreat hundreds of miles back to India were then trained as Chindits--a whole new variety of ways to die far from home!

Basics:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Sittang_Bridge

Great supplementary account by one of the men here:
http://www.euxton.com/army-Sergeant-Ginger-Yarnold.htm

Edit: just to say I love the inevitable nickname for this regiment: The Duke of Boots'
 
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Yithian

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The Secret Mosquito Stash
When Airbus tried to demolish a building, it uncovered treasure.
By Rebecca Maksel
AIR & SPACE MAGAZINE | SUBSCRIBE DECEMBER 2017

When Airbus Industries prepared to bulldoze a small World War II-era building at its Broughton, England facility last August, the crew found something astonishing: thousands of forgotten 80-year-old technical drawings for the de Havilland Mosquito, at one time the fastest aircraft in the world. Demolition was halted while Airbus contacted The People’s Mosquito, a U.K. charity hoping to restore and fly a version of the Royal Air Force’s versatile twin-engine bomber, and asked if they’d be interested in the documents.

John Lilley, chairman of The People’s Mosquito, immediately drove to the site. “When he got there,” says Ross Sharp, the charity’s director of engineering and airframe compliance, “he found himself staring at a filing cabinet full of more than 22,000 aperture cards.” (An aperture card is a microfilm image mounted on stiff card stock.) “It was an emergency situation,” Sharp continues, “so they put the cards—all 148 pounds of them—into refuse bags and loaded them into his car.”

Article follows with cool diagrams etc.
https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/secret-mosquito-180967119/#Wqdf7MVikvFvmMsV.01

Top stuff--I love mosquitoes
 

maximus otter

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Top stuff--I love mosquitoes
My dad was RAF aircrew in WW2, and served in Burma long enough to earn the Burma Star. He told me the following story as true. Make of it what you will:

Mosquitoes were largely constructed of wood, hence the aircraft's nickname "The Balsa Bomber". Glues were used in the construction of the airframe.

Dad assured me that Burmese termites developed a taste for the glue, and that more than one hapless RAF pilot found himself in the open air at 350mph and 10,000 feet, watching two Merlin engines plummeting to earth surrounded by a swarm of wooden components.

maximus otter
 
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My dad was RAF aircrew in WW2, and served in Burma long enough to earn the Burma Star. He told me the following story as true. Make of it what you will:

Mosquitoes were largely constructed of wood, hence the aircraft's nickname "The Balsa Bomber". Glues were used in the construction of the airframe.

Dad assured me that Burmese termites developed a taste for the glue, and that more than one hapless RAF pilot found himself in the open air at 350mph and 10,000 feet, watching two Merlin engines plummeting to earth surrounded by a swarm of wooden components.

maximus otter
...AKA 'the Wooden Wonder'!

According to a DVD I watched recently the adhesives were based on Casein, so probably very edible :dinner:
 

FrKadash

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'Hitler bell' to remain in German church as a memorial
27 February 2018

A village in Germany has voted to keep a controversial church bell embossed with a swastika and the words "All for the Fatherland - Adolf Hitler".

The parish council of Herxheim argued that the Nazi-era bronze bell acted as a reminder for the nation's dark past.
The 10-3 vote on Monday rejected an offer to remove and replace the bell by the Protestant Church of St James.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-43210993?SThisFB
 

Yithian

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I'm doing some of the dull--wish it could be automated--aspect of my research, building a list of cross-references for soldiers' names, gallantry awards and the codes for the files in which their citations can be found--it makes you go cross-eyed scanning thousands of pages.

This Military Medal citation one from a member of my grandfather's battalion stood out as epic in the telling:

Screen Shot 2018-03-04 at 00.06.31.png

One wonders what 'encouragement' he was shouting to his section while firing the Thompson.
 

Yithian

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Incidentally, Djebel Garci, where the action took place, is six miles to the west of Enfidaville in Tunisia. The reason why the men were obliged to fire from the standing position was primarily that they were fighting on the slopes of a 1000ft mountain.
 

Yithian

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Dan Snow recently posted this letter from a bereaved father to his son's C.O. In daily life I am not an overly lacrymose chap, but the fact that a man who had seen friends shot down at his side in the Great War had to endure the loss of a son in the next war made me cry.

The son appears to be Sergeant SMITH, JOHN GEORGE Service Number 1810132, who died on 23/11/1943 aged 20. He served with 630 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve and was the son of John Henry and Ada Marie Smith, of Woolwich, London--may they all rest in peace.

DYbXMK7X4AEMd80.jpg DYbXMLDW4AgQKgS.jpg DYbXMK8WAAEV5MI.jpg
 

gerhard1

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Couldn't find a specific World War Two and I don't think this belongs in the forgotten history thread either so here's to a new thread.

Good interview with Galland and the troubles he had with Goering and Hitler. Interestingly after the war he lectured British Pilots on tactics some of them he'd fought against. Also friends with Barder.

http://www.historynet.com/interview...waffe-general-and-ace-pilot-adolf-galland.htm


This article was written by Colin D. Heaton and originally appeared in the January 1997 issue of World War II.
FWIW, I just ordered the blu-ray discs of the 1970's documentary series on WWII, produced by the people at Thames, called The World at War, the first 26 episodes narrated by Sir Laurence Olivier, and the supplementary episodes by Reic Porter, after Sir Laurence died. I am also grateful to note that they are also listed as having English SDH subtitles, which, due to my hearing is a great thing to have.

I am really looking forward to getting the discs.

Is anyone here familiar with this excellent series?
 

gerhard1

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Fair and noble Yith, I tried numerous times to like your post, but so far, no joy. Please take this post as a 'like'.
 

Yithian

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FWIW, I just ordered the blu-ray discs of the 1970's documentary series on WWII, produced by the people at Thames, called The World at War, the first 26 episodes narrated by Sir Laurence Olivier, and the supplementary episodes by Reic Porter, after Sir Laurence died. I am also grateful to note that they are also listed as having English SDH subtitles, which, due to my hearing is a great thing to have.

I am really looking forward to getting the discs.

Is anyone here familiar with this excellent series?
I've only watched it about 500 times. It is one of the greatest television series ever produced.
 

Mythopoeika

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FWIW, I just ordered the blu-ray discs of the 1970's documentary series on WWII, produced by the people at Thames, called The World at War, the first 26 episodes narrated by Sir Laurence Olivier, and the supplementary episodes by Reic Porter, after Sir Laurence died. I am also grateful to note that they are also listed as having English SDH subtitles, which, due to my hearing is a great thing to have.

I am really looking forward to getting the discs.

Is anyone here familiar with this excellent series?
I remember watching it many years ago.
 

Swifty

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Same as Mytho .. I remember watching it as a nipper and being impressed, that's going to be one epic viewing binge gerhard1 ..
 

Swifty

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