The Start Of The End Is Near

PeteS

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Ah - I had a suspicion that an alter ego was involved. Thankfully poster is not sufficiently enlightened to alter his themes and pattern of posting.
 

Newt

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Well, my next gambit would have been to argue that William III, as a grandson of Charles I, was indeed a legitimate Stuart king.

But I suppose I don't need to bother now.
 

GNC

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I'm afraid the world ended back in the 1970s. We're just running on fumes now.
 

Lizard King

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I often think that when people say the world is now a much more dangerous place, have they forgotten about the Second World War? Not only was there fighting on just about every continent , massacres of civillians,mass rape and genocide but two atomic bombs were dropped!I even think of the cities I have lived in and think they are safer now with the invention of CCTV.Mass media has increased mass hysteria.
 

Cochise

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I often think that when people say the world is now a much more dangerous place, have they forgotten about the Second World War? Not only was there fighting on just about every continent , massacres of civillians,mass rape and genocide but two atomic bombs were dropped!I even think of the cities I have lived in and think they are safer now with the invention of CCTV.Mass media has increased mass hysteria.
I suspect they are old enough to compare to the late 50's when a lot of them grew up. For about 7 or 8 years there the US and UK did have a pretty peaceful time, probably seeming more so after the chaos of WW2. For me in the UK things started to go wrong with the rampant inflation in the 70's.
 

Lizard King

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I suspect they are old enough to compare to the late 50's when a lot of them grew up. For about 7 or 8 years there the US and UK did have a pretty peaceful time, probably seeming more so after the chaos of WW2. For me in the UK things started to go wrong with the rampant inflation in the 70's.
Being born in the 70s, growing up in the 80s I definately think we experienced really tough times.Unemployment, racism, crime{including knife crime which was as much a thing then} sex crimes/murders, mass shootings{Hungerford} Regular IRA bombs {or threats}etc etc I suppose my point is all the stuff we go on about now, has been about since decades but highlighted more with constant media coverage.
 

INT21

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Cochise,

When everything began to become out of the reach of folk with simple low pay jobs.

And the 'buy to rent' racket was just showing signs of starting. It really got under way in the eighties.

Lizard King,

It is definitely more dangerous for the world traveler. No one used to bother someone who was just 'passing through'.
 

Cochise

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Being born in the 70s, growing up in the 80s I definately think we experienced really tough times.Unemployment, racism, crime{including knife crime which was as much a thing then} sex crimes/murders, mass shootings{Hungerford} Regular IRA bombs {or threats}etc etc I suppose my point is all the stuff we go on about now, has been about since decades but highlighted more with constant media coverage.
The other thing I remember reading about with a sinking feeling that everything was going to come apart was the start of the Troubles in NI. I was actually only 12 at the time but I was a precocious (and weird) kid - I'd been reading newspapers since I was 7 or thereabouts. My parents took the Daily Sketch.
 

INT21

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It started to fall apart around here when the council began what was euphemistically called 'slum clearance'.

Basically demolishing was was low grade housing and moving the people to multistory flats.

The communities began to disappear and you didn't know the people around you.
 

Cochise

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I've always hated that. My Grandma and Grandad were kicked out of their (rented) house which had a nice garden and Grandad's shed. They'd been there for something like 15 years and had a good relationship with their landlord. (Mr. Lunny, IIRC) It came up for compulsory purchase due to some effing development scheme and the council 'kindly' offered them a flat on the 12th floor of a tower block.

Not very much different to being put under house arrest.
 

Lizard King

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Cochise,

When everything began to become out of the reach of folk with simple low pay jobs.

And the 'buy to rent' racket was just showing signs of starting. It really got under way in the eighties.

Lizard King,

It is definitely more dangerous for the world traveler. No one used to bother someone who was just 'passing through'.
Yes I agree,travelling much more limited now.
 

INT21

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Cochise,

In the case I mention above, it took another turn.

Last year the council decided that one of their block was going to cost too much to renovate. So they compulsorily moved everyone out into vacant flats in other blocks (there are six blocks). Once everyone was out, A Miracle! A housing developer bought the block (no one says for how much) and converted the flats into luxury apartments for the (relatively) well heeled.

Which was probably the plan all along.

INT21.
 

Cochise

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Cochise,

In the case I mention above, it took another turn.

Last year the council decided that one of their block was going to cost too much to renovate. So they compulsorily moved everyone out into vacant flats in other blocks (there are six blocks). Once everyone was out, A Miracle! A housing developer bought the block (no one says for how much) and converted the flats into luxury apartments for the (relatively) well heeled.

Which was probably the plan all along.

INT21.
We don't have an 'angry' reply like Facebook but assume I just clicked an 'angry'
 

Lizard King

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Not to get too off the thread theme...but I have a friend who took part in strikes in the Eighties, due to working conditions. He reckoned the guys who crossed the picket lines were the guys with the newly bought council house they once rented.The same guys who just got the new accessible credit card and the holiday to Majorca. He said watching those guys cross the line, he realised the country would never be the same again. He reckons those guys are still regarded as scabs 30 +years later.Well done Maggie.
 

INT21

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You got it :)

I don't know if it is the same where you are, but around here we have a couple of larger housing developers who build lots of 'new builds'. And they are quite nice.

Then they sell them to housing associations who immediately fill them with the problem families that have been moved out of other areas for bad behaviour. And, lots of people with East European accents. Russian is becoming a second language in places.

There is a saying,'don't apply for a house in an area until you have visited it in the evening'. They look ok in the daytime. but when the sun goes down it is very different.

A bit like Beirut on a Saturday night.
 

Mythopoeika

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There is a saying,'don't apply for a house in an area until you have visited it in the evening'. They look ok in the daytime. but when the sun goes down it is very different.
Yes... I made that mistake with the first house I bought.
Won't happen again.
 

INT21

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Lizard King,

Re 292 above.

Rather political. Best avoided.

I will only say I disagree.

INT21 :)
 

Lizard King

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Lizard King,

Re 292 above.

Rather political. Best avoided.

I will only say I disagree.

INT21 :)
I get what you are saying, but this is just me relaying my friend's story. He didn't refer to these people as scabs, it was just his observation of when he noticed a major shift in the society he lived in. I would have been 11 or 12 at the time so wasn't really aware. I have come to understand since and can see both points of view.But yes best avoided!
 

INT21

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Thanks for your understanding.

INT21 :)
 

PeteS

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I suspect they are old enough to compare to the late 50's when a lot of them grew up. For about 7 or 8 years there the US and UK did have a pretty peaceful time, probably seeming more so after the chaos of WW2. For me in the UK things started to go wrong with the rampant inflation in the 70's.
I feel extremely privileged to have been born in the 50's. Escaped ww2 rationing and conscription, born to middle class parents stay at home mother and father who worked for the same bank for 45 years. We weren't rich but free schooling and University and plenty of jobs to come out to. House prices very affordable( First house cost £4k) and money washing about in the 80's. Totally immune from industrial and worldwide unrest as well. Of course all started to fall apart a bit in the mid 90's but 40 good years. Yes very privileged indeed, and I don't forget it.
 

Comfortably Numb

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...feel extremely privileged to have been born in the 50's.

...Yes very privileged indeed, and I don't forget it.
Reading your post and reminiscences of a similar path!

Yea, great shout, likewise a 50s child and we were never rich, yet never poor.

Poignant, as I've been spellbound looking at some intrinsic photos from my contemporary upbringing in Glasgow.

Gladly share aforesaid thanksgiving and can only ponder... such as...

2019626_85836202_compress84.jpg
 

Floyd1

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You got it :)

I don't know if it is the same where you are, but around here we have a couple of larger housing developers who build lots of 'new builds'. And they are quite nice.

Then they sell them to housing associations who immediately fill them with the problem families that have been moved out of other areas for bad behaviour. And, lots of people with East European accents. Russian is becoming a second language in places.

There is a saying,'don't apply for a house in an area until you have visited it in the evening'. They look ok in the daytime. but when the sun goes down it is very different.

A bit like Beirut on a Saturday night.
You are very right. Even reasonably pleasant places in the day can be terrible at night (in Britain) and yes it's the same where I live concerning the new-builds as well, or certainly some of them.
On the Beirut point though, I have never been to Lebanon (well, my right hand has), but I have walked around the slums of Cairo at night and it's so safe it's unbelievable. The people who have nothing, even the street kids sleeping under bridges, always have a smile and just want to say 'Hello'. I imagine India is similar. Whether it's religion that makes those people that way, or just the way that they're brought up to be respectful-probably both. It always depressed me to come back to Britain with all the scowling,hard faces after a while in the Middle East.
 
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