The Strange Death of Netta Fornario

Naughty_Felid

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#1
I can't find anything about this on the MB.


Occasionally, we hear about a story that intrigues us to the point that we want to pass it on. The occult case of the Netta Fornario death in Iona, Scotland is just that kind of story. Although the details surrounding her death are unsubstantiated and cannot be verified due to lack of information, it makes for a fascinating story, nonetheless.

https://www.historicmysteries.com/netta-fornario/

 
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#2
It says the doctor examining her couldn't tell how she died but isn't that a job for the police or a coroner? I think the cross cut into the turf was part of a ritual she was performing when her mystery assailant discovered her.
There must have been some resentment towards her from some of the islanders. She was an independent woman for a start, a southerner travelling alone on a Scottish island. And she was into occult practices...

My theory is that a misogynistic local with deep-rooted Christian beliefs caught her in mid ceremony and killed her in a fit of rage. Being on an island meant that the local doctor had to perform multiple duties, including that of coroner and that he missed or deliberately concealed the actual cause of her death. For that, I would guess strangulation or bludgeoning.

^^ ^^
Purely speculation of course!

EDIT: Or the doctor did it.
 

Naughty_Felid

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#3
It says the doctor examining her couldn't tell how she died but isn't that a job for the police or a coroner? I think the cross cut into the turf was part of a ritual she was performing when her mystery assailant discovered her.
There must have been some resentment towards her from some of the islanders. She was an independent woman for a start, a southerner travelling alone on a Scottish island. And she was into occult practices...

My theory is that a misogynistic local with deep-rooted Christian beliefs caught her in mid ceremony and killed her in a fit of rage. Being on an island meant that the local doctor had to perform multiple duties, including that of coroner and that he missed or deliberately concealed the actual cause of her death. For that, I would guess strangulation or bludgeoning.

^^ ^^
Purely speculation of course!

EDIT: Or the doctor did it.
Plankton Holmes you done it again! rushes off to grab Casebook...
 
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Carse

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#7
I have a book which features this case - "Scotland's Unsolved Mysteries" by Richard Wilson (though presumably not that Richard Wilson). He interviewed the son of the family that Fornario stayed with on Iona, who described how she behaved while she was there. The 'cross' cut into the ground was apparently the invention of a journalist from The Scotsman, though she had apparently dug a small shallow hole in the ground next to where her body lay, and the silver knife she was alleged to have had with her was just an ordinary dinner knife. He reckoned she was mentally ill and died of hypothermia rather than any sinister occult influence.
 

MrRING

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#8
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maximus otter

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#10
"Woman with apparent mental issues dies of hypothermia in mid-November in northern Scotland."

Not much of a headline, unless a penny-a-word hack gets a picture of a photogenic young woman and decides to insert a little spice: Naked. Black magic. Crowley...

Terminal burrowing and paradoxical undressing are well-known effects/symptoms of severe hypothermia.

Also, there is something about parts of the rugged, beautiful northern Highlands of Scotland that induces people of a certain disposition to believe that it is a liminal zone between reality and the woo-woo lands. I lived for a couple of years on the Isle of Skye, and can attest that it attracts a Stonehenge/Glastonbury/Avebury crowd.

A lesser-known attraction on Skye is the Fairy Glen, which has at its heart Castle Ewen, a rock promontory shaped like a submarine's conning tower:



The views from the top are spectacular, including the mystical spirals etc. that Sixties throwbacks and the unconventionally-medicated have laid out at its base. I have my own photos of it, but they're hidden on a PC drive somewhere. These will give you the idea:





Movie buffs among you will recognise the area from the film Stardust which was filmed in the Fairy Glen while I lived on Skye.

maximus otter
 
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FrKadash

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#12
The photo is of Moina Mathers, wife of M, acgregor Mathews. I have been unable to source a photo of Netta Fornario.
Yeah I just found this thread for the first time and was about to say the same thing. Seems a bit sloppy that the author of the article didn't do their homework on the photo. I've never seen a photo of Fornario either. Dion Fortune who was friends with Fornario wrote about the case in her 1930 book Psychic Self-Defense.
 
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Tempest63

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#13
Dion Fortune who was friends with Fornario wrote about the case in her 1930 book Psychic Self-Defense.
I must admit it is probably 20 years or more since I last read Psychic Self-Defenceand I didn’t recall the story from there when I heard it on a podcast recently.

I believe it was on the Thinking Sideways Podcast.
 
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