The Transdimensional Gas Station

IbisNibs

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I personally suspect that such "glitches in the matrix" happen all the time,
I agree, I just believe that the "matrix" is our brains, not the physical world on a gross scale (as opposed to quantum scale) around us.

As for Google Street View, it is a sad fact that it is updated and is likely to have changed in the last 14 years since the OP.
It may be that the transdimentional gas station is now only visible on a transdimentional Google Street View. :(
 

EnolaGaia

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... As for Google Street View, it is a sad fact that it is updated and is likely to have changed in the last 14 years since the OP.
The OP posted the story circa 12 years after the events described. This extends the timeframe for possible evidence disappearance to over a quarter century.
 

henry

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A story that's rich in detail and so internally consistent but none of the details match up with Real Life is, in my estimation, highly suspect from the beginning
its not the case, that none of the details match current, or subsequent, reality ... rather that no single scenario or route as we now understand it, matches all

and if by fiction you mean a hoax, it wouldve been easy for the hoaxer to provide co ordinates/directions that fit the sequence of events better

the level of external (in-)consistency seems to me to be a function of human recollection, lack of confidence re parameters of the journey at the time, and part of the weirdness, but doesnt prevent it coming from a true account
 

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My saying "none of the details match up with real life" was obviously silly. Of course some of them do. The point is the story doesn't work with the known landscape, no matter what buildings might or might not exist in the area, which should be a big red flag. I'm not saying I think it was a hoax. The story could be largely true, complete with some kind of shift in reality. All in all, though, it sounds more like creepy pasta to me. There is a difference between a hoax and a tall tale, though they share some major features.
 

henry

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story doesn't work with the known landscape, no matter what buildings might or might not exist in the area
it does if you include fallible human experiencers in that landscape ... im undecided one way or another, on this case, but its a classic, and its interesting to have contemporary intel which adds to, not detracts from, the account
 

EnolaGaia

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If by that you mean assuming the people who had the experience were incredibly incompetent, then yes, I agree.
I won't go so far as to ascribe "incredible incompetence", but ...

There's an interpretation of this story that's been percolating in the back of my mind ever since I first read it years ago. This interpretation is admittedly quite speculative, but it's based on my experiences and observations from having emigrated to Sweden and lived there almost 5 years before moving back to the USA (only a month before the TGS incident is related to have occurred).

Here's some background, including some tidbits to which nobody seems to have given much attention ...

The OP / narrator was 18 years old, and would leave town for school following that summer. This pegs him as a recent secondary school graduate who was in his first month* of a summer job (quite possibly his first day job experience). His co-worker is described as a "friend" with no mention of his age or whether he was also a summer employee. I'll admittedly go out on a limb and presume the co-worker / friend was similarly young, and perhaps a recent secondary school graduate himself. My point: The protagonists in the TGS story were probably a pair of teenagers, at least one of whom was fresh out of school.

* Gymnasium graduations (and associated festivities) typically occur in the June run-up to midsommar celebrations (of which graduation parties and escapades play a major role).

The VW Transporter T3 (almost certainly 3rd generation) they were driving was owned by the kommun - i.e., it was a "company car." Vehicle ownership in Sweden at that time was an expensive and hassle-laden affair, the OP mentioned a comm radio installation, and in any case the OP states they switched to his co-worker's vehicle after returning to the kommun's home base. This last bit essentially confirms summer field workers weren't using their private vehicles on the job.

As of 1993 the VW T3 Transporter was available with a diesel engine in the European market(s). My point: Nobody would immediately question dispensing diesel / biodiesel fuel into a Transporter at that time.

The pair had just completed a day of physical work (pruning; mowing). They were undoubtedly tired, and given their apparent age range they were likely to have been thinking more about the upcoming evening than the mechanics of completing their workday. The co-worker / driver didn't even notice they were low on fuel until they'd been on the road for a few kilometers. The OP admitted the van was equipped with a regular (i.e., AM / FM) radio in addition to their comm radio, and I have little doubt they were listening to it if and when reception was feasible. Once the low fuel situation was noticed they made the common teen decision to "don't worry - lets' see how it plays out" instead of turning back to the day's work location, where a normal gas station would certainly have been available. My point: These two guys were going through the motions of another workday with little care or situation awareness - e.g., checking the fuel level in the van before leaving the kommun carpool that day.**

**NOTE: At that time in Sweden, working life was heavily regulated. Equipping employees was the total responsibility of the employer - especially within the public sector. The allegation they'd been sent out on a field assignment in a kommun vehicle with only a small amount (circa 1/4 tank or less) of fuel is something of a red flag or fishy element in this story. It gets even fishier when one notes these guys were allegedly left to their own devices (cash in their pockets) for procuring any fuel while out on assignment.

There's an alternative explanation for their oddly low fuel level according to the fuel gauge - the gauge was dysfunctional. The OP specifically stated the fuel gauge needle was fixed on its lowest possible position. He did not mention whether the fuel gauge registered an increased fuel load after adding something at the TGS. There's nothing in the OP's story to demonstrate the gauge was working at all.

It might well be that the kommun responsibly sent them on their way with sufficient fuel, but they didn't notice the abnormally low gauge reading until their return trip late in the day. The substantial amount of whatever-the-****-liquid they pumped into the gas tank should have causing the smoking and sputtering much sooner than a few kilometers' driving if the tank had been nearly empty.

The OP explicitly admits that whatever they'd put into the tank by the time they returned the kommun vehicle to home base had caused significant performance problems (and, for that matter, perhaps messed up the injectors or even the engine). The description of the liquid pumped out of the tank is consistent with cross-fuel mixing, water contamination, and even microbial infestation.

The strange little guy is explicitly described as persistently waving both hands as the pair drove away. Both his persistence and the use of both hands makes me wonder whether he was attempting to flag them down or signal a need to come back rather than simply waving goodbye. The alternative interpretation is that it dawned on the strange little guy that something was amiss (e.g., putting unusable fuel into the van's tank), and he was trying to get the boys' attention.

The most solid facts in the story are that two guys set out on a day assignment in a company vehicle and returned with the vehicle acting badly with adulterated fuel in the tank. This would have put the two guys very much on the spot to explain how they'd screwed up the kommun's van. Their explanation was bad gas obtained at a strange little rural garage / station along the way - a place that alleged subsequent investigations allegedly demonstrated didn't exist where they thought it had to be.

During the years this TGS thread has been active it's often been mentioned the two guys may have been mistaken about the location and route that day. That would still be my #1 suspicion if I were to take the story as factual at face value. My point in this post is that over time I've come to wonder whether the story itself is at most semi-factual and derives from an elaborate excuse for how the two guys managed to screw up the kommun's van (i.e., a cover-up) and not be held responsible for it.
 

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I have put in bold the things I've been referring to: The details that make the idea of the boys buying bad fuel (or the wrong fuel) from some place and then being confused about where they got it, well, just plain implausible. Not only would they both have to be morons, but the mechanic would have to be nearly as incompetent.

...

Me and a co-worker had finished work for the day pruning hedges and mowing lawns in a remote community some 10 english miles (15 km) away from our home office, and were on our way back. The road we were driving along (in a Volkswagen mini-bus) went through a quite rural area, fields and scattered bits of pine forest. There were (and still is) only a few, separated farm houses and cottages along the road, which is the only tarmac road in that area – all roads that connects with it along that stretch are either gravel roads or dirt paths. That summer alone, we must have driven along that road at least a hundred times, so we knew it quite well by that time.

After driving approximatively 5-7 kilometres along this road, my co-worker (who was driving) happened to notice that we were running low on gas - in fact, the needle of the gauge didn’t even move from its bottom position. The car was still running smoothly, but we doubted we could run on petrol fumes for another 10 km or so. At this point we had entered one of the few places along the road where it was flanked by woods on both sides (the area is otherwise fairly open, mostly farm land).

...


As I mentioned, we’d both travelled along this road many times, but never noticed this strange-looking gas station before. However, there were no eldritch feeling of strangeness or anything – we simply wrote it off as a trick of the mind that neither of us had seen it before, or had thought about it earlier. After all, sometimes you fail to notice mundane things until you actively search for them. I certainly didn’t reflect much over it at the time, just feeling relieved that we’d be able to get some gas and get home.

...

When we drove away, I lent forward and looked in the side mirror, seeing him in the distance, still waving and rocking to and fro.
We didn’t really speak a lot on the way home, but there was no feeling that something was amiss or anything. The only strange thing that happened was that the car started to run raggedly just a few kilometres after leaving the gas station, the engine misfiring in the manner it does sometimes when one or more cylinders fail to ignite (anyone who’s owned a Volkswagen will recognise the phenomenon). We commented on it and said that the old guy probably gave us diesel instead of 96-octane petrol. Indeed, the car’s exhaust gradually turned into a thick black smokescreen trailing behind us, like it does when you pour diesel into a petrol car.

By the time we arrived at our home office, the car coughed and spluttered constantly, so we took it to the civic department’s repair shop, by now convinced that we had been sold diesel instead of petrol, and rather pissed because we’d have to empty the gas tank by hand (which is quite messy). A guy at the repair shop helped us out with a hand-pump, emptying the gas tank into a large plastic tub. The stuff we pumped out of the tank was neither pinkish (as petrol) nor clear (like diesel oil), but a milky, opaque orange. It didn’t smell right, either, but almost sweet, like turpentine.

The repair guy (an old fox who probably knew everything there was to know about mechanical stuff) commented that the fluid looked like something called “war-time gasoline”. Apparently, during WWII, petrol was scarce, and an alternative needed. The solution was produced by a crudely refined fuel oil mixed with turpentine (or perhaps ethanol), on which old petrol engines could be run, albeit not very smoothly.

The guy asked us where we’d got the gas, and we told him, chuckling, about the strange gas station, even adding that we’d never noticed it before. Now, I really expected the guy (as he was really familiar with all the strange people of the area) to laugh along with us and tell us all about this strange old guy we’d met. Instead, he looked totally confused and said something like: “What gas station?”, and it was like a bubble had burst.

All of a sudden I was overwhelmed by how strange it was that we’d never seen this gas station before, and I became increasingly certain that, on every previous time we’d driven along that road, it hadn’t been there at all! Glancing at my friend’s face, it was obvious he was thinking the same thing.

We started asking the repair guy if he was really certain about this, and so on, but he maintained that, as far as he was aware, there was no gas station on that stretch of road. He actually began to look quite spooked as my friend and I became more and more agitated.

Eventually we left to change out of our work clothes and decided to take my friends car, drive back the way we came from and see if we could find the gas station. We actually drove the entire way back to the town we´d worked in that day, and back again, without ever coming upon the small open area where the gas station had been. It´s difficult to describe the feeling we had when we returned, we both were spooked, scared and exhilirated (sp?) all at the same time, you know? I sat in the passenger´s seat with the reciept we´d got from the strange old guy, and to me that mundane piece of grubby paper just seemed to emanate an almost palpable strangeness. I had some serious trouble sleeping for several nights after this, spending lots of my waking time going over this in my head...
If you think they were mistaken, then, well, whatever. I just don't see it.
 
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henry

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... whether the story itself is at most semi-factual and derives from an elaborate excuse for how the two guys managed to screw up the kommun's van (i.e., a cover-up) and not be held responsible for it
they put bad fuel in at some "unofficial" gas station, which destroys the motor, invented a fictional location for it when pressed by the super, but then rewrote it as a timeslip a decade later as a hoax ? or over the years the tale grew out its own high strangeness, to which auroborous maintains a genuine commitment ?
 

INT21

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My own experience with my car's fuel guage may feed into this.

The fuel guage has a habit of sticking at the almost empty position.

I am aware of this and allow for it by always putting in the same amount of fuel (10 Litre) then re-setting the mileage trip to zero. I know I can get at least 100 Mile before I really must refuel. I,E ten miles per litre.

Often a passenger has remarked 'you are nearly out of fuel' . I explain why there is no need to worry.

So maybe the VW wasn't in danger of running out.
 

henry

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fuel gauges in my experience are the most prone to error of all the dash cluster gauges, maybe due to voltage regulators to smooth out the reading, unreliability of floats and senders ...

either way, i dont think its especially relevant, they saw the low gauge reading and assumed it was accurate ...
 

EnolaGaia

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they put bad fuel in at some "unofficial" gas station, which destroys the motor, invented a fictional location for it when pressed by the super, but then rewrote it as a timeslip a decade later as a hoax ? or over the years the tale grew out its own high strangeness, to which auroborous maintains a genuine commitment ?
That's pushing things to the more pessimistic / negative limits of the implications I meant to illustrate, but yes - maybe.

There's nothing in the OP's account that indicates the engine was "destroyed", but the description of the engine's performance by the time they got it back to the kommun's home base almost certainly meant they'd fouled the injectors and maybe left sludge in the fuel lines / fuel rails.

... Which leads to two other possible lines of research nobody seems to have considered, much less done, before ...

Both these make sense to me given the Swedes' propensity for hyper-organization and strict accounting in public sector affairs ...

I wonder if there's an old archived carpool record at Mjölby Kommun showing some major fuel system repair work on a VW Transporter in July 1993 (or July 1993 +/-). :thought:

If the two guys had paid 150 SEK (circa $20 - $25 US at the time) for fuel that was the kommun's responsibility, wouldn't there have been a record of their requesting reimbursement? :thought:

... And before you ask - here's the obvious follow-up question ...

If they formally requested reimbursement, how is it the OP / narrator kept the receipt that should have been submitted in support of the request? :thought:

... Which - in the event they didn't request reimbursement - has to make one wonder ...

Why didn't they submit a formal request for reimbursement? :thought:

That amount (in that time and that place) wasn't mere chicken-feed for a couple of young employees who in principle weren't obligated to buy fuel for their employer.
 
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hunck

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I too think it's most likely fiction but well told, with a good snappy memorable title, & it's produced enough intrigue to last 19 pages & 14 years of responses so far. The receipt never materialised did it? & the op vanished fairly early on..

If it were posted in another thread, Time Slips eg, I don't think it would've had quite the legs it's had, & would just be another interesting story, although better than most. It's taken on something of a legendary status which has resonated.
 

EnolaGaia

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... then rewrote it as a timeslip a decade later as a hoax ? or over the years the tale grew out its own high strangeness, to which auroborous maintains a genuine commitment ?
As to these after-the-fact aspects of the story ...

If (to some extent, even if only partially) the story began as a cover-up it had to be agreed with the co-worker and maintained by both him and the OP / narrator. It could well be that the cover story was so well rehearsed and repeated that over time it supplanted the course of events for which it substituted.

This supplanting wasn't necessarily deliberate - it simply might have resulted from memory degradation over the dozen years between its origin and its posting here.

Because of this, I won't go so far as to claim the later posting of the story had to be an outright hoax.

On the other hand ... I have no problem accepting the notion the story may have grown by being glossed with additional woo-factor over the years.

NOTE: I don't want to give the impression I believe the story is 100% fiction. For example ... There may well have been a desperate refueling at an obscure establishment with a strange little guy, but (e.g.) at a location the two young men couldn't afford to specify without getting into more trouble than they were already in for having messed up the vehicle.
 

EnolaGaia

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I too think it's most likely fiction but well told, with a good snappy memorable title, & it's produced enough intrigue to last 19 pages & 14 years of responses so far. The receipt never materialised did it? & the op vanished fairly early on..
Agreed ... Regarding the "well told" bit ... As of that period, all young Swedes had learned English in school (minimum of 4 years' study, as I recall). However, I'm struck by the well-polished English (and vocabulary) of the OP / narrator. His command of English was remarkable, even by the relatively high Swedish standards.


If it were posted in another thread, Time Slips eg, I don't think it would've had quite the legs it's had, & would just be another interesting story, although better than most. It's taken on something of a legendary status which has resonated.
Agreed ...

"Transdimensional Gas Station" has become as entrenched in this forum's lexicon and memetic inventory as (e.g.) "dancing cows." I'd go so far as to claim it's the #1 example of forum-specific cross-referencing to be found here.
 

EnolaGaia

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..."Transdimensional Gas Station" has become as entrenched in this forum's lexicon and memetic inventory as (e.g.) "dancing cows." I'd go so far as to claim it's the #1 example of forum-specific cross-referencing to be found here.
I forgot to mention another relevant fact ... This TGS thread was the place where backinthebush's similar (and similarly legendary) thread originated in 2013 ...

These Roads Lead... Where?
https://forums.forteana.org/index.php?threads/these-roads-lead-where.54598/

The arrival of that thread's OP and request to post a similar story (see page 1 over in that other thread) were transplanted out of this TGS thread into its own, where it eventually grew to 8 pages in length.
 

Austin Popper

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I forgot to mention another relevant fact ... This TGS thread was the place where backinthebush's similar (and similarly legendary) thread originated in 2013 ...

These Roads Lead... Where?
https://forums.forteana.org/index.php?threads/these-roads-lead-where.54598/

The arrival of that thread's OP and request to post a similar story (see page 1 over in that other thread) were transplanted out of this TGS thread into its own, where it eventually grew to 8 pages in length.
Thanks for the reminder. That, too, is an awesome story. It seems a bit more plausible to me, if memory serves.

These stories live in a kind of "liminal space" where they can't be disproved. Theoretically they could be proven, maybe. Or not. My own such experience has become just an odd footnote for me. I know it was no hallucination, fugue state in which I managed to not mow down any pedestrians with my two tons of Pontiac, and so on. It was a real event with no mundane explanation, even though it seemed perfectly ordinary at the time. I'm sure I would have forgotten it quite soon but for the fact that I recalled a hardware store that surprised my by its existence. If it had been a second hand store or a vacant storefront, or any one of a thousand other things, I'd have shrugged it off and forgotten it. One thing it has done, though, is make me far less likely to write off someone else's weird story as bullshit or a silly mistake.
 

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All of these convoluted scenarios are getting almost as entertaining as the OP. It's a good story. It can just sit there. I have no need to explain it away.
its a good point about provenance of the receipt though, business expense would typically trigger a process which would remove receipt from him, not addressed in the otherwise detailed account
 

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One little detail which struck me was the description of the fuel put into the VW. Old petrol, particularly contaminated by water, would look and smell exactly as the OP described it. I've emptied old contaminated fuel out of bikes and cars, and it has a very distinct appearance and sweet sickly odour. It will also affect the running of a motor as the OP described, that is if the car can be started.
I'm not familiar with Sweden but I wonder whether the guy did come across a former one pump petrol station (the type you used to see in the Uk into the 60's in isolated areas) which still had some old petrol in the tank and the owner saw the opportunity of making a few bob out of a couple of kids. "I couldn't find it again", merely an excuse to employer?
Just a strange detail to add to his story, which rang true to me.
 

EnolaGaia

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One little detail which struck me was the description of the fuel put into the VW. Old petrol, particularly contaminated by water, would look and smell exactly as the OP described it. I've emptied old contaminated fuel out of bikes and cars, and it has a very distinct appearance and sweet sickly odour. It will also affect the running of a motor as the OP described, that is if the car can be started.
Exactly ... That's why I stayed focused on bad / wrong / contaminated fuel. It's the one element in the story that seems the most "solid" (factual). The mention of wartime homebrew fuel strikes me as something of a red herring, because it's more likely to have been recent old gasoline that had become contaminated than ancient (40-some year old) war gas.

The next most obvious suspect would be diesel or biodiesel fuel, which would be consistent with the black smoke the OP / narrator mentioned.

But there's another possibility that fits the facts ...

In that rural area there would have been a market for fuel intended for smaller engines (e.g., agricultural machinery) rather than automobiles. I'd also point out there are many lakes in that area - raising the possibility of fuel intended for boat motors.

The two workers had spent the day "pruning and mowing lawns." If they were using power equipment with two-stroke engines they would probably have been carrying fuel mixed with oil for two-stroke use.

Few automobiles used two-stroke engines, but it's worth pointing out one of them was the ubiquitous Swedish Saab. The early two-stroke Saab car engines were phased out by the time of the TGS incident, but there were still plenty of old Saabs on the road.

This means there were three applications in that area for which the TGS may have stocked pre-mixed two-stroke fuel - farm equipment, boat motors, and maybe old Saabs.

This raises the possibility that the bad fuel was current two-stroke fuel the young guys mistakenly added to the VW's gas tank (maybe without realizing it made a difference).

If they'd run low on gas and naively dumped their power equipment two-stroke fuel into the tank that might explain everything - including the need to come up with a cover story once they'd realized they'd screwed up.
 

EnolaGaia

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I'm not familiar with Sweden but I wonder whether the guy did come across a former one pump petrol station (the type you used to see in the Uk into the 60's in isolated areas) which still had some old petrol in the tank and the owner saw the opportunity of making a few bob out of a couple of kids. "I couldn't find it again", merely an excuse to employer?
Just a strange detail to add to his story, which rang true to me.
Something like that seems entirely plausible, as I suggested earlier. However, I'm not sure the strange little man was deliberately exploiting the situation.

Based on the OP's description I'm pretty confident the place was an old garage or workshop that served the local farmers rather than an active retail gas station. It might even have been a private workshop / garage on someone's large farm.

Even the OP admits they had to go looking for someone manning the TGS, and everything in the story suggests to me the strange little man they found was as confused about them as they were about him.

This is why I mentioned the possibility it had dawned on the strange little man they shouldn't have put that fuel in a VW, and he was trying to flag them down rather than waving goodbye as they left.
 

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If they'd run low on gas and naively dumped their power equipment two-stroke fuel into the tank that might explain everything - including the need to come up with a cover story once they'd realized they'd screwed up.
But two-stroke oil adds a characteristic blue shade to the exhaust smoke, rather than black (not to mention an evocative smell...). I suppose it's possible the two-stroke oil could foul the spark plugs of a four-stroke engine (lord knows, the plug on my MZ used to foul, and that was a two-stroke, never mind a four-stroke...), which would cause the engine to misfire, but I labour under the impression that unburnt petrol produces white smoke from the exhaust. I've always been led to believe that black smoke is the result of engine oil somehow entering the combustion chamber. Of course, there's nothing to say that the dodgy fuel wasn't contaminated with engine oil, but I'm not sure I'd buy the argument that they had put pre-mix in.
 

EnolaGaia

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I generally agree, but ...

Oil contamination in the engine's exhaust will cause smoke, and this smoke can vary in color from a light bluish-gray to dark charcoal gray (i.e., dark enough to be recalled as "black" a dozen years later) depending on the amount of oil (etc.) being passed.

Since the smoke subject has come up ... The one thing that doesn't necessarily ring true about the notion they were burning water-contaminated gas is the claim of black smoke. It takes some significant pollution with carbon (compounds) to get dark / black smoke. Water contamination alone wouldn't / shouldn't give much smoke at all, and any smoke it did cause should be light / whitish (as with unburnt gasoline and / or steam).

If the fuel had been contaminated with both water and some other organic material (or a lot of hydrocarbons from heavier oil), black smoke would be more plausible.

My guess is that observation or mention of black smoke was likely to have been the clue that made the home base mechanic think of wartime fuel containing fuel oil.
 

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I generally agree, but ...

Oil contamination in the engine's exhaust will cause smoke, and this smoke can vary in color from a light bluish-gray to dark charcoal gray (i.e., dark enough to be recalled as "black" a dozen years later) depending on the amount of oil (etc.) being passed.

Since the smoke subject has come up ... The one thing that doesn't necessarily ring true about the notion they were burning water-contaminated gas is the claim of black smoke. It takes some significant pollution with carbon (compounds) to get dark / black smoke. Water contamination alone wouldn't / shouldn't give much smoke at all, and any smoke it did cause should be light / whitish (as with unburnt gasoline and / or steam).

If the fuel had been contaminated with both water and some other organic material (or a lot of hydrocarbons from heavier oil), black smoke would be more plausible.

My guess is that observation or mention of black smoke was likely to have been the clue that made the home base mechanic think of wartime fuel containing fuel oil.
Agreed. Black smoke can also be related to a knackered diesel motor( or a petrol tank mistakenly part filled with diesel) , white smoke often to a blown head gasket when cooling water gets in the mix, although an air cooled engine won't suffer from the latter. Often you will get blue smoke when piston rings are worn and the motor is burning engine oil.
Thinking about it, the OP's description of an orange milky opaque sweet smelling substance does remind me of paraffin which my parents used to use in their home heaters right through to the 80's (even now I wonder that we were all not suffocated by the fumes). In the north of the UK you used to be able to buy pink paraffin which tuned to orange if left in a bottle for a long time. Paraffin is now blue if you can find it- I don't know why.
 

PeteS

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I agree, I just believe that the "matrix" is our brains, not the physical world on a gross scale (as opposed to quantum scale) around us.

As for Google Street View, it is a sad fact that it is updated and is likely to have changed in the last 14 years since the OP.
It may be that the transdimentional gas station is now only visible on a transdimentional Google Street View. :(
A transdimentional Google Street View - that would be epic.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
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A transdimentional Google Street View - that would be epic.
You can view a Google street view over the years.
There's a little control at the top left, next to where it says the date. Click on it and you can see a little window. If you click on the slider in this small window, you can see a street view that was recorded at different dates/times.
 
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