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Cochise

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Took The Stan Man on his favourite walk down the beach today for the first time since his accident- I persuaded a passer by to take some short videos, but it seems this is the only one short enough to upload :

 

Cochise

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Assume its about 10:30pm in the 'old normal' at the bar and I've had several pints and feel the need to tell a story.

Back when I was living in the US, I was the board member in active charge of development at 'a software company' . As it happened the controlling interest in the company was in the hands of one man, who held shares worth, at that time, $27million. We were doing very well.

Microsoft (I mention them because they are entirely blameless) wanted to buy us out, more particularly because our software would have solved a particular problem that they were having at the time. Now the above guy, who I knew fairly well, was at the time in a state of depression having just lost his mother and was a fellow ex-pat Brit, also going through a painful divorce. The company was keeping him sane, so he didn't want to sell. I can understand this more myself now because my work bolstered me up for a long time after my wife died.

While said chap was back in Blighty, I was approached by the CFO and the CEO (I think my official title was CTO at the time - Chief Technical Officer - I've never cared much about job titles) - who were planning some sort of coup to get the company sold - I don't know how, and offered to cut me in for a third of the action. I declined, because it was obviously going to be something underhand. And being a loyal (and stupid) employee I let Mr. $27million know what was afoot, having not been sworn to secrecy. Which caused unpleasantnesses that there is no need to go in to.

Little did any of us know that the company was literally at its zenith, and it was all downhill from there on. The shares were , a decade later, worthless.

So we should have sold, and muggins, instead of being a dollar multimillionare, is now sitting in North Wales on the last of his savings and looking forward to a winter when I can't afford to heat the house. So I wasn't kidding when I said I'd rather be broke with a reasonably clear conscience.

Also, with my luck, if I had taken the bribe - which is what it was - they'd either have swindled me out of it or I'd have been killed in a freak accident shortly afterwards. Doesn't do to mess with the trousers of time.
 
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Mythopoeika

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Assume its about 10:30pm in the 'old normal' at the bar and I've had several pints and feel the need to tell a story.

Back when I was living in the US, I was the board member in active charge of development at 'a software company' . As it happened the controlling interest in the company was in the hands of one man, who held shares worth, at that time, $27million. We were doing very well.

Microsoft (I mention them because they are entirely blameless) wanted to buy us out, more particularly because our software would have solved a particular problem that they were having at the time. Now the above guy, who I knew fairly well, was at the time in a state of depression having just lost his mother and was a fellow ex-pat Brit, also going through a painful divorce. The company was keeping him sane, so he didn't want to sell. I can understand this more myself now because my work bolstered me up for a long time after my wife died.

While said chap was back in Blighty, I was approached by the CFO and the CEO (I think my official title was CTO at the time - Chief Technical Officer - I've never cared much about job titles) - who were planning some sort of coup to get the company sold - I don't know how, and offered to cut me in for a third of the action. I declined, because it was obviously going to be something underhand. And being a loyal (and stupid) employee I let Mr. $27million know what was afoot, having not been sworn to secrecy. Which caused unpleasantnesses that there is no need to go in to.

Little did any of us know that the company was literally at its zenith, and it was all downhill from there on. The shares were , a decade later, worthless.

So we should have sold, and muggins, instead of being a dollar multimillionare, is now sitting in North Wales on the last of his savings and looking forward to a winter when I can't afford to heat the house. So I wasn't kidding when I said I'd rather be broke with a reasonably clear conscience.

Also, with my luck, if I had taken the bribe - which is what it was - they'd either have swindled me out of it or I'd have been killed in a freak accident shortly afterwards. Doesn't do to mess with the trousers of time.
You did the moral thing, even though it did not reward you financially.
Kudos.
[Holds up glass]
 

Cochise

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You did the moral thing, even though it did not reward you financially.
Kudos.
[Holds up glass]
Yeah.

Still wonder if I really did the right thing. Mr $27million would presumably made some money if we had sold, as well as the three officers. I mean, i don't see how they'd have got the shares off him. But I never knew what the plan was, having jibbed, as it were at the first hurdle.

I have had other opportunities, but they've always conflicted with my 'rules' - like you don't leave in the middle of a project you are leading, even if someone is trying to poach you. Me and my mate Phil who has a similar moral compass sometimes sit and tell each other how stupid we've been. If you happen to walk into a pub in Liverpool in a few years time and there are a couple of old geezers in the corner chuntering about COBOL and SSADM it'll be us.
 

Mythopoeika

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Yeah.

Still wonder if I really did the right thing. Mr $27million would presumably made some money if we had sold, as well as the three officers. I mean, i don't see how they'd have got the shares off him. But I never knew what the plan was, having jibbed, as it were at the first hurdle.

I have had other opportunities, but they've always conflicted with my 'rules' - like you don't leave in the middle of a project you are leading, even if someone is trying to poach you. Me and my mate Phil who has a similar moral compass sometimes sit and tell each other how stupid we've been. If you happen to walk into a pub in Liverpool in a few years time and there are a couple of old geezers in the corner chuntering about COBOL and SSADM it'll be us.
Unfortunately for me, I have similar rules and a similar moral compass. This has not rewarded me at all.
I'll probably die poor, I suspect.
 

Mr Mischief

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Still wonder if I really did the right thing. Mr $27million would presumably made some money if we had sold, as well as the three officers. I mean, i don't see how they'd have got the shares off him. But I never knew what the plan was, having jibbed, as it were at the first hurdle.
If there was going to be something unethical going on with getting hold of the shares then you might just have dodged a bullet. The US legal system takes a hard line with that shit so being poor in Wales is better than being Bubba's bunk mate.
 
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skinny

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Word, Swift. How ya truckin matey?
 

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Assume its about 10:30pm in the 'old normal' at the bar and I've had several pints and feel the need to tell a story.

Back when I was living in the US, I was the board member in active charge of development at 'a software company' . As it happened the controlling interest in the company was in the hands of one man, who held shares worth, at that time, $27million. We were doing very well.

Microsoft (I mention them because they are entirely blameless) wanted to buy us out, more particularly because our software would have solved a particular problem that they were having at the time. Now the above guy, who I knew fairly well, was at the time in a state of depression having just lost his mother and was a fellow ex-pat Brit, also going through a painful divorce. The company was keeping him sane, so he didn't want to sell. I can understand this more myself now because my work bolstered me up for a long time after my wife died.

While said chap was back in Blighty, I was approached by the CFO and the CEO (I think my official title was CTO at the time - Chief Technical Officer - I've never cared much about job titles) - who were planning some sort of coup to get the company sold - I don't know how, and offered to cut me in for a third of the action. I declined, because it was obviously going to be something underhand. And being a loyal (and stupid) employee I let Mr. $27million know what was afoot, having not been sworn to secrecy. Which caused unpleasantnesses that there is no need to go in to.

Little did any of us know that the company was literally at its zenith, and it was all downhill from there on. The shares were , a decade later, worthless.

So we should have sold, and muggins, instead of being a dollar multimillionare, is now sitting in North Wales on the last of his savings and looking forward to a winter when I can't afford to heat the house. So I wasn't kidding when I said I'd rather be broke with a reasonably clear conscience.

Also, with my luck, if I had taken the bribe - which is what it was - they'd either have swindled me out of it or I'd have been killed in a freak accident shortly afterwards. Doesn't do to mess with the trousers of time.
U fkn idiot!


(I’d’ve dun the same, mate)
 

Comfortably Numb

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First time in for ages...

Half the problem these days is still whether you can, or not!

Took this photo yesterday, at a local Italian restaurant.

IMG_20200808_013427_resize_96.jpg



Nonetheless, I would dearly love a quality vodka with fresh pineapple juice, my good bartender and a round for everyone.

So, what stories...

Aha! Cochise's car is back from the garage...!

Way too much muscle for myself there and I am contemplating purchase of an electric bike.
 

EnolaGaia

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I have my Saab Aero back on the road. 255bhp. AWESOME - I've had it up to 120 on the Welsh back roads. Despite dodgy far eastern tires. Yes I'm irresponsible -Tough.
Does that mean you've settled the fallout from the garage collision incident? Or is that still an active hassle in progress?
 

Comfortably Numb

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.... so long as you stay on your side of the glass (i.e., your screen).
Face masks and I do not get on.

I feel claustrophobic and they never fit.

In Scotland, wearing one is now 'mandatory' on public transport. Couple of days ago, I was about to get on local bus, started to put on facemask, stretched elastic hoops behind both ears, lost hold of one end and my facemask pinged off into the distance...
 

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As I've said said somewhere on here already,I use a long scarf instead of a proper mask. The buses and shops all accept it as an alternative, and I find it much more comfortable than a mask.
 

Comfortably Numb

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As I've said said somewhere on here already,I use a long scarf instead of a proper mask.
Likewise...!

Well... I used to.

It was the perfect opportunity to array oneself in my cherished Buchanan (family) tartan, lambswool scarf.

Alas, this consequently required its first washing and something went dreadfully amiss.

Perhaps easier to explain, if I simply take a photograph, shown to scale beside a £1 coin:

IMG_20200808_101906_resize_51.jpg


It emerged from the washing machine shrunken, tattered and will only unfold so far as is shown, with the rest being steadfastly stuck together - as if with industrial strength superglue.

However... I have just (seriously!) noticed something I genuinely hadn't previously.

Dammit!!!!

IMG_20200808_101000_resize_95.jpg
 

Comfortably Numb

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Is that just gone eleven o'clock..

In which case, it's not *that* early and a flagon of house finest ale, thank you kindly.

And a drink behind the bar for GNC.

So... whilst enjoying first, 'un tipo de aperitivo' of a splendidly sunny, Saturday morning, merely a thought that I was browsing online earlier and noticed the following, quoting space.com:

"The speed of light in a vacuum is 186,282 miles per second (299,792 kilometers per second), and in theory nothing can travel faster than light".

Theoretically though, surely it most be possible. Otherwise, if who/whatever was responsible for designating this limit can't make it go any faster, then they must come up against a speed limitation.

Who/what imposed that then?

:beer::popc:
 

Comfortably Numb

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Most, if not all, of your good selves will be familiar with 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight'.

Inadvertently came across an early recording of the song, then another much earlier version and subsequently YouTube highlighted a third video, which seems to explain a poignant connection between the first two.

I bookmarked them for the next time I was here, as it suggested an interesting story.

I haven't seen any of them as yet and maybe worth a speculative, quiet Saturday morning look?



 

Cochise

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Question (and this is exactly the sort of question that gets asked in the pub ca. 10:30pm)

Which is the bigger miscarriage of justice?

a) Being executed for a murder you did not commit

or

b) spending life in a ghastly prison (anywhere outside North West Europe, pretty much) for a murder you did not commit.

Thoughtful answers only please. It's not a joking matter and I don't intend it as a flippant question.
 

Mythopoeika

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Question (and this is exactly the sort of question that gets asked in the pub ca. 10:30pm)

Which is the bigger miscarriage of justice?

a) Being executed for a murder you did not commit

or

b) spending life in a ghastly prison (anywhere outside North West Europe, pretty much) for a murder you did not commit.

Thoughtful answers only please. It's not a joking matter and I don't intend it as a flippant question.
Surely, it's a? At least there is a remote chance of survival and appeal with b.
 

EnolaGaia

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Evaluating Cochise's miscarriage of justice query depends in part on whether you're considering "miscarriage of justice" in its strictly legal sense or its casual / colloquial sense.

To the extent it's addressed in the strictly legal sense (sometimes under different labels; disparately across multiple jurisdictions) the notion of error (miscarriage) concerns the process leading to a final conviction. From this strict legalistic perspective - and within those jurisdictions where the legalistic concept is acknowledged - the scope of concern extends only as far as final conviction, and the two alternatives are equivalent for being erroneous or wrongful convictions.

My point is that Cochise's query makes sense as a debatable conundrum only if "miscarriage of justice" is being invoked in its casual / colloquial sense.
 
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Cochise

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Evaluating Cochise's miscarriage of justice query depends in part on whether you're considering "miscarriage of justice" in its strictly legal sense or its casual / colloquial sense.

To the extent it's addressed in the strictly legal sense (sometimes under different labels; disparately across multiple jurisdictrions) the notion of error (miscarriage) concerns the process leading to a final conviction. From this strict legalistic perspective - and within those jurisdictions where the legalistic concept is acknowledged - the scope of concern extends only as far as final conviction, and the two alternatives are equivalent for being erroneous or wrongful convictions.

My point is that Cochise's query makes sense as a debatable conundrum only if "miscarriage of justice" is being invoked in its casual / colloquial sense.
I've just been reading about (a tiny minority) of cases where the defendant has been subject to evidence tampering or concealment by police. In other words, where the court and jury has been duped. Hence my question.

But yes, b) should be preferable. Only the knowledge that one is innocent and a bloody minded determination to prove the system wrong would keep one sane, though.

I don't know why I posted , really, I was just envisioning what a horrible situation one would be in.
 

Cochise

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Docu about Waco on ATM. I was in the US when that went down. One of the incidents in my life that turned me against governments. It's a strange journey I've been on from and old school Liberal with socialist tendencies to a libertarian and pacifist. But it is based on me being apalled by the excesses of those we have put in charge without sufficient checks and balances.

One of the biggest truisms in cliches - and just because they are cliches doesn't mean they are wrong , far from it it, is that power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.

People think of the last couplet of that statement, and envisage Pol Pot and Hitler. Actually those people are reasonably obvious, at least to people outside their direct control.

But the first couplet is more relevant - have we not seen , over the last few years, that without a strong externally applied moral code, no-one can be trusted with power? Certainly there were abuses in the Victorian period, but once abuses were proved the perpetrator would be ostracised. Now people get away with abuse with barely a shrug.

edit: Maybe I've read too much Heinlein. But everyone is prepared to defend their family (I hope) but should we defend a country? Are they not - especially on a Continental basis - simply arbitrary political lines? Do we actually need 'countries'?
 
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Cochise

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Again, philosophy. As encountered in any traditional pub after about 9:30pm.

I DESPISE men who deliberately hurt women. Now, I grant, I was brought up in a different age and in a matriarchal family - except my Dad who was the universal go-to if there was family trouble.

I'm also not naive and I understand there are dominating and indeed violent women.

But my point remains. Women are to be protected and cherished, not hurt. Of course their thought processes are impenetrable to males. OK, but their love and commitment is not.

Under extreme provocation I have come close to hurting a woman roughly twice - once when I fling a bowl of spag bog at my first wife who was constantly getting drunk and leaving our child strapped into his pushchair for hours outside pubs. It missed. And this was because the nurse next door was threatening to report her and we would have lost our boy.

I also had to pull my second wife of my leg by her hair because she had partaken of a 'friends' bootleg brandy and had become convinced she was a dog and sunk her teeth into my calf.

What an interesting life I have led. But I still believe any man who deliberately hurts a woman is scum. Male abusers and killers of women outnumber female perps by something like 50 to 1.
 

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Likewise...!

Well... I used to.

It was the perfect opportunity to array oneself in my cherished Buchanan (family) tartan, lambswool scarf.

Alas, this consequently required its first washing and something went dreadfully amiss.

Perhaps easier to explain, if I simply take a photograph, shown to scale beside a £1 coin:

View attachment 28711

It emerged from the washing machine shrunken, tattered and will only unfold so far as is shown, with the rest being steadfastly stuck together - as if with industrial strength superglue.

However... I have just (seriously!) noticed something I genuinely hadn't previously.

Dammit!!!!

View attachment 28712
What you've actually done is felted the scarf.

Have you sorted it?
What I'd do is take a big bowl of warm water and tip an entire bottle of cheap fabric conditioner into it, and submerge the scarf in it.
Press it down and gently squeeze it to saturate it. Leave it for a couple of hours, then take it out and gently pull it back into shape.
When it's looking like its old self, rinse it thoroughly and spread it out to dry on a convenient haggis bush.

Be patient. It works. I have rescued treasured garments this way.

Next time you might buy some of those miraculous tumble-dryer dry-cleaning sheets. I like them.
 

Comfortably Numb

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What you've actually done is felted the scarf.

Have you sorted it?
It has just been rescued from a bag of clothing items which were imminently destined for one of those big outdoor recycling bins.

Although seems impossible to restore anywhere remotely close to its former splendour... right then, let's have a go at this...

OK, Comfort fabric conditioner (no expense shall be spared) added to shopping list for tomorrow morning and I shall provide bulletins throughout the day. :)

Would be amazing if... my Buchanan tartan scarf was a Christmas gift some years back.

However, I hold faith and in anticipation of a celebratory dram all round, I have had a quiet word with the proprietors and this is already on order..

Screenshot_20200825_202910_resize_85.jpg


At 70° proof... bet that's got a wee kick tae it. :p
 
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