The Unwhinge Thread

Iris

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Some years ago I bought an echium, Pride of Madeira, which has lovely blue spires.
However, much to my disappointment, it turned out white.
The rampant geranium grew over the top and it disappeared, so I thought I had lost it.
However this year it has vigorously returned further out with flower spikes.
Guess what? They are Blue and I'm so pleased.
I had trimmed it and put the pieces in a pot which struck and I gave one to my friend who had lost hers so she will be happy when I tell her it's blue.
 

ramonmercado

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The cardiac monitoring turned out to be 24 hour blood pressure/pulse monitoring, so the device was less intrusive. All is well so I won't be getting a bionic heart just yet. I paid €120 to get around waiting lists, worth it though for peace of mind.
 

Cochise

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I've just achieved a bit of personal understanding. My wife always used to say my look could be terrifying if I was upset (not with her). and a friend also said to me recently that because of my eyes he and his circle wouldn't argue with me.

I've just been reading a (fictional) book about a detective who is great at reading criminals through their eyes, and particularly their eye movements. I don't know if that is a thing.

Now, I only have one eye, I had a long and difficult process from when i lost the eye to when I could wear a false eye instead of going around with a gauze patch or an unpleasant (bleeding, pussy) empty socket. When i finally got a plastic eye, any sudden eye movement would risk the false eye popping out. it still happens occasionally even now. Because my damaged socket causes the bottom eyelid to fold up under the false eye and it can flip it out.

There are two things from this.

First, I do not use my good eye to look around, I turn my head. Any detective looking for betrayal of my intentions through eye movements is going nowhere.

Second, all the horsefeathers in novel after novel about the expressiveness of eyes is wishful thinking. One of my eyes can express nothing and yet I've had women gazing into them and saying how wonderful they are. They aren't. There is no 'they' At least my second wife knew before we got together about the false eye and never gave me that nonsense.

Bear in mind that if you actually looked at my 'eyes' there can be no mistake - one pupil expands and contracts, the other doesn't. My conclusion is that no-one , ever, truly 'gazed into their lover's eyes'. And maybe it's that's fixed look which gives the 'terrifying' aspect., because really I'm not.
 

EnolaGaia

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First, I do not use my good eye to look around, I turn my head. Any detective looking for betrayal of my intentions through eye movements is going nowhere.
Turning the whole head is a potential 'tell' indicating the subject has only one working eye or some other issue with his / her horizontal field of vision (in addition to suggesting the subject is abnormally suspicious of his / her surroundings).
 

Cochise

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Turning the whole head is a potential 'tell' indicating the subject has only one working eye or some other issue with his / her horizontal field of vision (in addition to suggesting the subject is abnormally suspicious of his / her surroundings).
Well, in a way, 'abnormally suspicious of surroundings' would sum up anyone with one eye, in that inevitably one has a reduced field of vision and so one checks the surroundings beyond that range more frequently than someone with a wider horizontal field.

Interesting, though. The reason i put this in 'unwhinge' is that it has always slightly worried me that people read things into my - what shall we call it? 'ocular expression' . It's kind of a relief to find its a thing.
 

Floyd1

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Well, in a way, 'abnormally suspicious of surroundings' would sum up anyone with one eye, in that inevitably one has a reduced field of vision and so one checks the surroundings beyond that range more frequently than someone with a wider horizontal field.

Interesting, though. The reason i put this in 'unwhinge' is that it has always slightly worried me that people read things into my - what shall we call it? 'ocular expression' . It's kind of a relief to find its a thing.
Does Peter Falk (Columbo) do it? He does tend to tilt his head a bit I think. Never noticed Leo McKern (Rumpole) do it though. I'll make a note tonight when it's on.
 

Cochise

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Does Peter Falk (Columbo) do it? He does tend to tilt his head a bit I think. Never noticed Leo McKern (Rumpole) do it though. I'll make a note tonight when it's on.
Gordon Brown does it.
 

Floyd1

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A bit of diy;
Fed up of having a shower and the curtain sticking to you? No more with this handy device using a bulldog clip, piece of string and the dog's toy ball!
 

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escargot

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I've just achieved a bit of personal understanding. My wife always used to say my look could be terrifying if I was upset (not with her). and a friend also said to me recently that because of my eyes he and his circle wouldn't argue with me.

I've just been reading a (fictional) book about a detective who is great at reading criminals through their eyes, and particularly their eye movements. I don't know if that is a thing.

Now, I only have one eye, I had a long and difficult process from when i lost the eye to when I could wear a false eye instead of going around with a gauze patch or an unpleasant (bleeding, pussy) empty socket. When i finally got a plastic eye, any sudden eye movement would risk the false eye popping out. it still happens occasionally even now. Because my damaged socket causes the bottom eyelid to fold up under the false eye and it can flip it out.

There are two things from this.

First, I do not use my good eye to look around, I turn my head. Any detective looking for betrayal of my intentions through eye movements is going nowhere.

Second, all the horsefeathers in novel after novel about the expressiveness of eyes is wishful thinking. One of my eyes can express nothing and yet I've had women gazing into them and saying how wonderful they are. They aren't. There is no 'they' At least my second wife knew before we got together about the false eye and never gave me that nonsense.

Bear in mind that if you actually looked at my 'eyes' there can be no mistake - one pupil expands and contracts, the other doesn't. My conclusion is that no-one , ever, truly 'gazed into their lover's eyes'. And maybe it's that's fixed look which gives the 'terrifying' aspect., because really I'm not.
Screen/TV actors playing love scenes are told to look into the other person's eye that's nearer the camera. You can't look into both someone's eyes at once.
 

Cochise

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Screen/TV actors playing love scenes are told to look into the other person's eye that's nearer the camera. You can't look into both someone's eyes at once.
Well I certainly can't :) . Never having had binocular sight I didn't know a normally-sighted person couldn't.

I can't look at myself, of course, so I never knew quite what the missus and others were talking about.

Of course I shouldn't be worrying about it - I'm not really - but I'm curious. My B-I-L once tried to explain to me the way the brain evolves differently in a person that only ever had one functional eye, and why it's more difficult for people who lose an eye as an adult to adjust, but it was a bit too much for me. He's a very senior doctor in Australia and specialises in sports medicine, and has had to help sportsmen with eye damage to rehabilitate.

edit: just thought of this:

The guy that saved this plane Captain Dardano - is amazing. He lost an eye in a terrorist attack but overcame that and went on to fly 737's

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TACA_Flight_110

That's a story to warm the old cockles.
 

pandacracker

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When i finally got a plastic eye, any sudden eye movement would risk the false eye popping out. it still happens occasionally even now. Because my damaged socket causes the bottom eyelid to fold up under the false eye and it can flip it out.

I don't want to seem unsympathetic but that's a fantastic ability! You could really fuck with some people.

I'm prepared to pay for your services.
 

Cochise

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I don't want to seem unsympathetic but that's a fantastic ability! You could really fuck with some people.

I'm prepared to pay for your services.
I did drop it in the bottom of someone's pint once. I've also considered painting a spare one silver or something and wearing that. But I'm (slightly) less juvenile now ;)
 

GNC

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I did drop it in the bottom of someone's pint once. I've also considered painting a spare one silver or something and wearing that. But I'm (slightly) less juvenile now ;)

Have you ever seen Charles Dance in Last Action Hero? He could be your role model.
 

Frideswide

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Just saying that @Krepostnoi is an extremely nice young man! A very very very very nice young man!

You rock sir! :twothumbs: :cheer:
 

Floyd1

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Was thinking last eve about people you meet very briefly (who you like) and never see again.

Met an old boy from New York once in Egypt and for a start whenever I hear a New York accent I can't help but think of gangsters. Racist? Accentist? maybe, but for someone of my age from England, that's how it is.

Anyway, he told me that he couldn't afford to live in the States all year, so he'd go to Egypt for part of the year. He had been an inspector on the skyscrapers in New York and told me that he was not very good with heights, but so as to not lose respect from the guys, he occassionaly had to go up. He couldn't walk along the steel like they did, but had to shuffle along on his backside with his feet in the web of the girder.
He also told me that in the 60s they brought along better safety precautions like a net a few storeys below and sometimes just for a laugh at the end of the day, the guys would fall backwards into the net.
I know nothing else about him and never will, but an 'unwhinge' for having met him at all (and also many others over the years in all sorts of circumstances).
 

ChasFink

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I got a coupon code for Paramount+ last month that extends the free trial from 7 to 30 days. As I wanted to see Picard, I used it and saw a few movies as well. I didn't have time to see a lot, though, and didn't feel like paying for a service that didn't stream very well. I went to cancel my account before the billing kicked in, and they said something like "Don't go - have another month on us!" I wonder how many times they'll let me do that.
 

ChasFink

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sometimes just for a laugh at the end of the day, the guys would fall backwards into the net.
What could go wrong? :chuckle:
Yeah. Nothing beats using safety equipment for fun! I know at my junior high school we used to empty the fire extinguishers after a tough exam. Then we'd go out to the parking lot and lightly tap all the car bumpers with a sledge hammer - not enough to cause any obvious damage, just to make sure they would do the job in a low-speed impact.

Edit: It is obvious I'm being sarcastic, isn't it?
 
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maximus otter

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WARNING: Contains account of successful hunt.

My reader may recall my account - in the Whinge thread - of the debacle of the second of July. Yesterday morning I redressed the balance, and all is well with the world again. Read on:

I reached the farm at about 0630hrs. Conditions were good - light winds from the SW blowing directly into my face - but the morning seemed unnaturally dark for some reason. I had seen very little over my past few stalking outings, so my expectations weren't high.

Withing a hundred yards of starting my usual patrol, my binoculars picked up two large shapes industriously guzzling my mate's new crops. They weren't aware that I was even in the same postcode, allowing me to stalk to just over 100 yards from them. At that range, even my superb Swarovski 8 x 42 binoculars could only tell me that they were roe; from the fact that there were two of them close together, however, it was 90% likely that they were does, hence out of season until 1st November. Closing to less than 100 yards caused them to move away, not alarmed but concerned.

Walking on, I saw the same pair of roe ahead, now positively identifiable as does, this time accompanied by a Chinese water deer (CWD), also out of season until 1.11. My luck seemed to be consistent...

I patrolled on, into the next big field. Another pair of CWD about 115 yards off. They saw me, and soon legged it, bounding off through the growing crops. *sigh*

Approaching the spinney near where I had seen the roebuck on 2nd July I was peering around, when my brain made a sudden connection: I had noticed what appeared initially to be a clump of vegetation close by. When at stone-throwing distance, my mind suddenly processed what I was seeing from vegetable to animal: not one but two CWD peering myopically from close range! Out of curiosity I raised my bins and sparkled them with the ranging laser. The Swaros have a safety feature in that they won't give a range reading if the lasered object is less than 30 metres away. No reading: two (unshootable) deer within thirty yards...

*sigh*

Onward. I reached, then passed, the point where I'd taken my embarrassing shot (and miss) at a nice roebuck on 2.7

Fifty yards farther on, I was strolling along a hedge line, eyeing the fields to right and left, when movement in the field over the hedge attracted my attention. I didn't even need my bins to PID the object: it was a large, handsome roebuck moving in the same general direction as me on a parallel course, slightly ahead of me and about 115 yards away. It might well be the one which had had the lucky escape months ago!

I quickly set my Sako 85 up on my quad sticks and took careful aim at his boiler room. I gently squeezed the trigger, adding the final ounce of pressure as he paused to take a last mouthful of my pal's livelihood...

TIIiishh-pok!

The 120-grain Nosler Ballistic Tip crossed the intervening distance in 0.125 seconds, striking him high on the offside shoulder. He didn't take a step, merely crumpled in his own hoofprints.

And breathe out...

Roe-buck-arrow.jpg


The scene seconds after the shot; approx position of the buck arrowed

I reloaded, reapplied the safety, and walked to where he lay.


My approx firing position arrowed

He was, indeed, a massive chap. I would estimate his weight as he lay at between 50 to 55lbs. Luckily, a few weeks ago I made the excellent purchase of a deer drag harness. It proved its worth today, as - rather than making two round trips to the gralloching point - I simply hooked him up and dragged him, still carrying all my kit, to the tree.

IMG-6116.jpg

Why I do so much work on my shoulder muscles in the gym...

I did a good (for me!) gralloch, then loaded the monster into my pack for the slog back to the car. By the time I got there, I was sweating like a pig in clingfilm. This bugger was making me sing for my supper...

Back home here's the tale of the tape (this is gralloched, head & legs off, remember):

IMG-6121.png


43lbs! Ouch!

After my inexpert skinning:

IMG-6125.png

From memory: 32lbs as seen above

He is now safely ensconced in a deer's natural habitat: my fridge. I look forward to enjoying several delicious meals and snacks, courtesy of this chap and my wonderful wife's superb cookery skills.

Life is good.

maximus otter
 
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Nosmo King

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WARNING: Contains account of successful hunt.

My reader may recall my account - in the Whinge thread - of the debacle of the second of July. Yesterday morning I redressed the balance, and all is well with the world again. Read on:

I reached the farm at about 0630hrs. Conditions were good - light winds from the SW blowing directly into my face - but the morning seemed unnaturally dark for some reason. I had seen very little over my past few stalking outings, so my expectations weren't high.

Withing a hundred yards of starting my usual patrol, my binoculars picked up two large shapes industriously guzzling my mate's new crops. They weren't aware that I was even in the same postcode, allowing me to stalk to just over 100 yards from them. At that range, even my superb Swarovski 8 x 42 binoculars could only tell me that they were roe; from the fact that there were two of them close together, however, it was 90% likely that they were does, hence out of season until 1st November. Closing to less than 100 yards caused them to move away, not alarmed but concerned.

Walking on, I saw the same pair of roe ahead, now positively identifiable as does, this time accompanied by a Chinese water deer (CWD), also out of season until 1.11. My luck seemed to be consistent...

I patrolled on, into the next big field. Another pair of CWD about 115 yards off. They saw me, and soon legged it, bounding off through the growing crops. *sigh*

Approaching the spinney near where I had seen the roebuck on 2nd July I was peering around, when my brain made a sudden connection: I had noticed what appeared initially to be a clump of vegetation close by. When at stone-throwing distance, my mind suddenly processed what I was seeing from vegetable to animal: not one but two CWD peering myopically from close range! Out of curiosity I raised my bins and sparkled them with the ranging laser. The Swaros have a safety feature in that they won't give a range reading if the lasered object is less than 30 metres away. No reading: two (unshootable) deer within thirty yards...

*sigh*

Onward. I reached, then passed, the point where I'd taken my embarrassing shot (and miss) at a nice roebuck on 2.7

Fifty yards farther on, I was strolling along a hedge line, eyeing the fields to right and left, when movement in the field over the hedge attracted my attention. I didn't even need my bins to PID the object: it was a large, handsome roebuck moving in the same general direction as me on a parallel course, slightly ahead of me and about 115 yards away. It might well be the one which had had the lucky escape months ago!

I quickly set my Sako 85 up on my quad sticks and took careful aim at his boiler room. I gently squeezed the trigger, adding the final ounce of pressure as he paused to take a last mouthful of my pal's livelihood...

TIIiishh-pok!

The 120-grain Nosler Ballistic Tip crossed the intervening distance in 0.125 seconds, striking him high on the offside shoulder. He didn't take a step, merely crumpled in his own hoofprints.

And breathe out...

Roe-buck-arrow.jpg


The scene seconds after the shot; approx position of the buck arrowed

I reloaded, reapplied the safety, and walked to where he lay.


My approx firing position arrowed

He was, indeed, a massive chap. I would estimate his weight as he lay at between 50 to 55lbs. Luckily, a few weeks ago I made the excellent purchase of a deer drag harness. It proved its worth today, as - rather than making two round trips to the gralloching point - I simply hooked him up and dragged him, still carrying all my kit, to the tree.

IMG-6116.jpg

Why I do so much work on my shoulder muscles in the gym...

I did a good (for me!) gralloch, then loaded the monster into my pack for the slog back to the car. By the time I got there, I was sweating like a pig in clingfilm. This bugger was making me sing for my supper...

Back home here's the tale of the tape (this is gralloched, head & legs off, remember):

IMG-6121.png


43lbs! Ouch!

After my inexpert skinning:

IMG-6125.png

From memory: 32lbs as seen above

He is now safely ensconced in a deer's natural habitat: my fridge. I look forward to enjoying several delicious meals and snacks, courtesy of this chap and my wonderful wife's superb cookery skills.

Life is good.

maximus otter
Just a quick question, if Chinese water deer are a non-native, invasive species, why is there a hunting season for them?
 

maximus otter

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Just a quick question, if Chinese water deer are a non-native, invasive species, why is there a hunting season for them?

I think it's for several reasons:

a) It's becoming rarer in its homeland

b) It seems to pose little major threat to UK agriculture

c) Its numbers are low in the UK

d) Unlike the muntjac, it has a breeding season (muntjac are dirty little buggers: at it 24/7/365)

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/nov/23/specieswatch-chinese-water-deer

Still, I suppose that's what the authorities thought as recently as when I was a teenager: "Muntjac? Well there are only a few of them, aren't there? I don't see a problem..."

:headbang:

maximus otter
 

Nosmo King

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I think it's for several reasons:

a) It's becoming rarer in its homeland

b) It seems to pose little major threat to UK agriculture

c) Its numbers are low in the UK

d) Unlike the muntjac, it has a breeding season (muntjac are dirty little buggers: at it 24/7/365)

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/nov/23/specieswatch-chinese-water-deer

Still, I suppose that's what the authorities thought as recently as when I was a teenager: "Muntjac? Well there are only a few of them, aren't there? I don't see a problem..."

:headbang:

maximus otter
Can you hunt muntjac all year round?
 
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