The Unwhinge Thread

rynner2

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Yes, congrats. :)

But I hope you have better luck than me - my kids were stolen from me in the 70s, and I've since lost contact. I know I have two grandchildren now, but I doubt if I will ever meet them. Forgive me if I don't go into details - it's still painful.
 
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Yes, congrats. :)

But I hope you have better luck than me - my kids were stolen from me in the 70s, and I've since lost contact. I know I have two grandchildren now, but I doubt if I will ever meet them. Forgive me if I don't go into details - it's still painful.
:grouphug:
 

Iris

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Congratulations, it's such an exciting time bringing new life into the world.
My sister rang to say that her daughter in law is 20 weeks pregnant. Her husband died last year but they had frozen his sperm before he had chemo and she has successfully used IVF.
 

escargot

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Congratulations, it's such an exciting time bringing new life into the world.
My sister rang to say that her daughter in law is 20 weeks pregnant. Her husband died last year but they had frozen his sperm before he had chemo and she has successfully used IVF.
Oh what wonderful news, after such a tragedy. You all have my very best wishes.
 

Yithian

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Congratulations, it's such an exciting time bringing new life into the world.
My sister rang to say that her daughter in law is 20 weeks pregnant. Her husband died last year but they had frozen his sperm before he had chemo and she has successfully used IVF.
That's beautiful in an ultra-modern way. It almost doesn't need saying (I never knowingly miss the chance to state the obvious), but in a way it's like her a trace of her husband will return to her.
 

rynner2

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It's Life after Death - which is what all life is, after all. Individuals will die, but mostly the genetic line carries on.

All my grandparents are dead, but I'm still here (just about!) I have two children and two grandchildren, so when I'm gone something of me (and all of my ancestors) will probably carry on.
 

Iris

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Yes it's comforting and there is always the hope that they will prove to be someone who improves the human race.
 

rynner2

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There's a new barber shop opened within walking distance of where I live! Today I used it for the first time. The barber's a woman, quite quick and good, and it only cost 50p more than at my previous one. In fact it'll probably work out cheaper overall, as they put a stamp on a card every time you visit so that after a few visits the cost of the haircut reduces! And no buses to get there, which will save me time! :D
 

Gizmos Mama

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Sailing has been going great, and getting out on the lake is my biggest unwhinge!! I'm away from work, the city, and humanity in general. I love being on the water, and depending on the day, I can have almost the whole lake to myself.
(Ghost Resevior, AB.)

Even the weather has been (mostly) great!

I'm learning lots, as I'm new to sailing, even though I grew up as a young kid on a sailboat (Dad's), I haven't been on a sailboat, except for about 3 days in total during lessons, 2 yrs ago! And I'm doing it single handed, so it's a steep learning curve!! But, it has been the best thing I've done for myself in, well... EVER!!!

I'm not much of a youtuber, (or videographer, sadly!) but I posted some videos. If anyone cares to check it out, they are at;





Cheers!
 
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Swifty

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I expect she'll be off to a hardcore rave tonight, tripping her tits off, sleeping with loads of people and hopefully punching a policeman at some point.

edit: joking aside, I've just been chatting with her on the phone (my family took her out for dinner yesterday), she's still as sharp as ever and we've just been joking about whether it will be Queen Elizabeth, King Charles or King William that sends her her 100th birthday card. She laughed and said "You never know" ..:)
 
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Swifty

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Best wishes to your grandma on her birthday, Swifty! It's marvellous that she has reached that age and remains sharp. We should all have a drink for her at the Troll's Head.

:glee:
Nice one GingerTabby and thank you ... I'm already half cut mate .. :) .. *chinks glasses with the Trolls Head crew* ...

You should have met Joe, her fella, my Grandad. He popped off on April the first, '91. He was ace :) .. not only did he help to develop the spitfire engine, he also once told me at junior school "If you're ever scared or frightened, tell me about it and I'll sort them out" ... and he had a piss up the back of my Dads house one day, I think he was trying to remind my Dad to remain humble. I'd give anything to hook up with him again. He was a total naughty bastard ..:cool:
 
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titch

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i had a lovely day at dover castle, watching roman scum marching about, they were very impressive
 

Rerenny

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The photo that makes me happy and sadder than I thought possible...


When you think the world is full of savages, just think about this man, Patrick Karabaranga, and remember far more people want only the best for others, including our animal brothers, than want to destroy humanity.

The photo is a few years old, although I only saw it for the first time a couple of days ago, so I assume that the gorilla is all grown up now (I bloody hope so) and that Patrick has been fending off marriage proposals since the picture was published.
 

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Yithian

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It's a great photograph, but reading that the gorillas in Virunga National Park and nearby Volcanoes (across the border in Rwanda) are still under threat from poachers and war as they were in Dian Fossey's time, is depressing; in fact, now they have oil prospectors to contend with as well.
 

Rerenny

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It's a great photograph, but reading that the gorillas in Virunga National Park and nearby Volcanoes (across the border in Rwanda) are still under threat from poachers and war as they were in Dian Fossey's time, is depressing; in fact, now they have oil prospectors to contend with as well.
Indeed, the gorillas and other animals are still under threat, they are still being killed for no reason, and the park rangers have precious little chance to do much to stop it. The poachers are immensely violent shits and something ought to be done at a very high level to counter the issue (I have no idea what because I get myself into quite a state and can't read too much without breaking down).

I need to remind myself that whilst the poachers (and the people that pay them) are revolting pieces of human detritus, there are other people living in DR Congo, or Uganda, or wherever, who truly care and want to do something to help and protect the wildlife, and I think that man represents the very best of humanity, sitting quietly with a young, bereaved gorilla. It also helps to remind me to not dismiss an entire group of people because of the actions of some.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Indeed, the gorillas and other animals are still under threat, they are still being killed for no reason, and the park rangers have precious little chance to do much to stop it. The poachers are immensely violent shits and something ought to be done at a very high level to counter the issue (I have no idea what because I get myself into quite a state and can't read too much without breaking down).

I need to remind myself that whilst the poachers (and the people that pay them) are revolting pieces of human detritus, there are other people living in DR Congo, or Uganda, or wherever, who truly care and want to do something to help and protect the wildlife, and I think that man represents the very best of humanity, sitting quietly with a young, bereaved gorilla. It also helps to remind me to not dismiss an entire group of people because of the actions of some.
I think poachers kill primates to feed their families. The UN could put aside a small amount of money that would mean they would never have to hunt again and invest in the beautiful place they live.

Don't blame the poachers, blame us for not doing more.
 

Rerenny

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http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/endangered_species/great_apes/gorillas/threats/
Of course the world would be a better and fairer place if it were guided by Ghandi or Martin Luther King Jr. or anyone who is not consumed by the need for power. If the UN was operating within a different framework, if countries in Africa did not have corrupt governments. If laws were passed and actually enforced, that would make a difference. It is despicable that laws are not enforced, that the weakest and most vulnerable are ignored in favour of the rich and powerful, but that is the way it is, for now. I'm not saying that the rest of the world, regular citizens of Planet Earth should be complacent and simply accept it (support the WWF, petition, lobby, protest for the things you believe will help change the situation), I am saying that as it stands today, I have the same amount of pity for the poachers as I do for the foot soldiers of the Islamic State; I'm sorry that they are so desperate to take the actions they do, and I am angry that their government/leaders, and the forces beyond the local government, are not doing enough to change for the better the situations their fellow countrymen face, but I am not currently in the emotional mindset to forgive them.

Desperate situations result in desperate actions: the Siege of Paris resulted in immensely civilised people eating zoo animals and clearly the fault lay elsewhere than just with the Parisians, so I can see that I should have more sympathy for what people feel they have to do to survive. But if it somehow boiled down to me having to choose whether a poacher lived or a gorilla lived, I would choose the gorilla. If an IS soldier lived or a Kurdish citizen, I'd choose the Kurd. I'm not right, it's not fair but it is how I respond. I have tried to make it clear that I am in a constant state of learning, what I think to be true one day may be changed the next after I have learned further information. I also happen to think that the responsibility for the planet and all of its inhabitants lies with everyone; there is no us and them, ultimately. We all (or at least most of us) have some power to change things, with our votes, with our support, with our demands upon our governments. Even with our money. But as private, emotional individuals we can still choose to condemn someone who kills a gorilla, or tiger, or homosexual, or poet, and also choose to not give a toss about their personal circumstances; I think that is wrong and I do try to overcome those thoughts but it's not exactly easy, certainly not for me as I am someone who actively identifies as a misanthrope (although again, I am making the effort to overcome that aspect of my personality.) Perhaps the important thing is to recognise that in spite of our personal loathing of some other human, we shouldn't let that stop us from trying in some way to get things changed. I personally at this point in time value the life of the gorilla and the park ranger more than I do the poacher but I also am aware that there are other forces at play and that I should be more widely sympathetic in my judgements. There are nuances and gradations of existence and responsibility that should be considered, but when I am in the black days and I think a meteor heading in the direction of the planet is something to be welcomed, that's when I need to look at a photograph of a human comforting a gorilla, so that I can remember there are good people being good, and that there are more people and creatures that need help, not obliteration. And finally, that I can be a part of that process of change, however small and however much I wouldn't invite some of the people being helped around for dinner, my version or interpretation of Hall's condensed explanation of Voltaire's beliefs: I disapprove of what you say, but will defend to the death your right to say it.

And so on and so forth, ad nauseum, but I now need to smooch Archie and get his dinner ready.
 
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PRIMATES = rare and endangered
POACHERS = LOADS, not rare and obviously too many for the environment to support

Hm....
I'd kill the last dodo if it meant food for my starving family. It's easy to take the view that 'poachers are all evil' but anyone killing animals for food where food is scarce and the economy is unstable has a strong imperative to do so.
 

rynner2

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I've just watched the Team GB women's 470 crew accept the Gold Medal in the sailing at Rio. :glee:

I saw four fascinating races today in different classes, which made up for yesterday's non-action.
 
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