The Unwhinge Thread

Iris

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I've had trouble with my knee for awhile s9nce I fell over a pot in the garden, but yesterday I took a step and twisted it, so thought I might have damaged it further.

But today It seems to have gone back into place and I can get up and down easily, so I'm really pleased.
 

JamesWhitehead

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A horrid cold came on yesterday, so I retreated to bed quite early with hot drinks and paracetamol in a shivery state. Just as I was feeling comfortable, I thought I heard dripping in the bathroom. It nagged, though I thought it was only a tap. Reluctantly, I dragged myself from between the sheets to investigate.

It turned out to be the joint of the cistern with the mains. A bucket was in place, which was just as well as the trickle seemed to be growing worse by the minute. I knew what it was, fortunately: the fibre washers last just four years. I had a stock of them but was in no mood to do the repair immediately. The mains had to be turned-off till morning.

The unwhinge is that it could have been much worse. Four years ago, the joint failed with a sudden violent spray of mains pressure. My luck was in that day, as I was there to hear it and limit the damage. I recall it also went at a moment when I was preoccupied with other anxieties.

A further unwhinge is that today's simple repair seems to have twisted the ball-cock back into its proper position, stopping the annoying drip of an overflow, which had been encouraging a growth of moss in the yard. :yay:
 

Mythopoeika

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A horrid cold came on yesterday, so I retreated to bed quite early with hot drinks and paracetamol in a shivery state. Just as I was feeling comfortable, I thought I heard dripping in the bathroom. It nagged, though I thought it was only a tap. Reluctantly, I dragged myself from between the sheets to investigate.

It turned out to be the joint of the cistern with the mains. A bucket was in place, which was just as well as the trickle seemed to be growing worse by the minute. I knew what it was, fortunately: the fibre washers last just four years. I had a stock of them but was in no mood to do the repair immediately. The mains had to be turned-off till morning.

The unwhinge is that it could have been much worse. Four years ago, the joint failed with a sudden violent spray of mains pressure. My luck was in that day, as I was there to hear it and limit the damage. I recall it also went at a moment when I was preoccupied with other anxieties.

A further unwhinge is that today's simple repair seems to have twisted the ball-cock back into its proper position, stopping the annoying drip of an overflow, which had been encouraging a growth of moss in the yard. :yay:
I am constantly on the alert for dripping noises after a couple of my radiators sprang leaks. On both occasions, I was there to do something about it. I do fear the possibility that a massive leak will happen while I'm away.
At the moment, my mains has a leak that is costing me a lot of money, so I've got some guys coming over on Thursday to reroute the mains pipe and finally fix it (I hope).
 

James_H

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Brilliant day for seeing animals. Woke up to some otters, which I was frankly not expecting in the middle of a tropical mangrove, later saw a whole load of eagles fishing, a massive lizard, and a lot of mudskippers, mangrove crabs, and some crab eating macaques doing what they do best and eating crabs.
 

escargot

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I am constantly on the alert for dripping noises after a couple of my radiators sprang leaks.
A radiator literally 'sprang' a leak years ago in a flat I had, late at night, while I was sitting beside it.

I heard a ping and looked down between the radiator and wall, where it seemed to come from, and saw a little fountain of water spurting from a tiny hole in the metal.

If I hadn't been sitting up late reading on that winter night as close to the radiator as possible the water would have run all night and caused damage. As it was I could shut it off in time and deal with the leak.

Strange that a brand-new radiator could suddenly have a hole in it, must have been a fault in the metal.
 
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By coincidence to the plumbing related posts above, my unwhinge is that yesterday I fixed a radiator in the hall which wasn't putting out much heat with the help of a video on youtube.

I had to switch off every other radiator in the house except the dodgy one and then whack the heating on full blast before slowly turning the rest back on again. It's scorching now and the cause was an 'unbalanced system'.

Also, our boiler has a pressure gauge and if it drops significantly it can mean that there is something leaking somewhere.
 

Mythopoeika

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A radiator literally 'sprang' a leak years ago in a flat I had, late at night, while I was sitting beside it.

I heard a ping and looked down between the radiator and wall, where it seemed to come from, and saw a little fountain of water spurting from a tiny hole in the metal.

If I hadn't been sitting up late reading on that winter night as close to the radiator as possible the water would have run all night and caused damage. As it was I could shut it off in time and deal with the leak.

Strange that a brand-new radiator could suddenly have a hole in it, must have been a fault in the metal.
Yes, one of mine went like that. It was only 10 years old. I had just turned off the TV and was about to go up to bed when I heard a ping and a gurgle. The heating wasn't on, but I turned off the electrics and had to call an emergency plumber (because I couldn't isolate the radiator).
 

Megadeth1977

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First the good news hmv has been saved the bad news is 27 stores are closeing including their flagship store and yes I know there's still fopp but there metal section of incredibly small and I don't like there film section because they don't have big selection of movies and don't think I found any 4K disks.
 

titch

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When I'm at work it sometimes flies right over my head. First time I saw it I was like WHAAAAAT THE ACTUAL? LOOK EVERYONE! IT'S A HUGE TALL PLANE! :wtf:

and everyone else like ffs Scargy, it's the Beluga and everybody has one... :bored:
oooo! i have seen it fly over Chester zoo quite a few times!
 

JamesWhitehead

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Region 1 unwhinge.

None of my several players has ever been coaxed into multi-regional status by the arcane rituals of typing-in reams of digits when the tray is out . . . I swear some people write those things on message boards, just to tantalize.

A note on a message board suggested that I could probably get Region 1 discs to play on my external disc-drive with VLC. I had never bothered with the Samsung disc-drive, since the initial transfer of heritage data to my Mac Mini.

Some faffing about established that they will play - albeit without their Extras. Trying to play those makes VLC throw a hissy fit.

So I now have playable versions of San Francisco, We're No Angels & a double-sider with both versions of Cinema Paradiso. :crazy:
 

Yithian

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Since Christmas I've been teaching a first-year university student. She is studying film-making but hasn't yet learned 'the idiom' of movies, and so we've been discussing a different 'classic' each week. She's learning about how to watch, how directors communicate narrative and meaning, and I'm getting paid for the pleasure of watching and discussing a bunch of great films, most of which I probably should have seen years ago.

So far we've had:

Blood Simple (1984) Dir. Joel & Ethan Cohen.
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Dir. Stanley Kubrick.
The Third Man (1949) Dir. Carol Reed.
Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) Dir. Sergio Leone.

And next week it's:
Rashomon (1959) Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Probably go for a Hitchcock for the last class.

Unwhinge!
 

Frideswide

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That's a definite unwhinge!

Mine is that I got a set of the Victoria Plum cross stitch charts for a more than reasonable price. They don';t come up on ebay or etsy.

So second unwhinge is that my dutch, backed up with online translation, stood up to the conversation!
 

cycleboy2

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Since Christmas I've been teaching a first-year university student. She is studying film-making, but hasn't yet learned 'the idiom' of movies and so we've been discussing a different 'classic' each week. She's learning about how to watch, how directors communicate narrative and meaning, and I'm getting paid for the pleasure of watching and discussing a bunch of great films, most of which I probably should have seen years ago.

So far we've had:

Blood Simple (1984) Dir. Joel & Ethan Cohen.
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) Dir. Stanley Kubrick.
The Third Man (1949) Dir. Carol Reed.
Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) Dir. Sergio Leone.

And next week it's:
Rashomon (1959) Dir. Akira Kurosawa

Probably go for a Hitchcock for the last class.

Unwhinge!
Hitchcock - my vote is for Rear Window. I was never a huge fan of Hitchcock until, during my university film course in 1983 or so, we watched Vertigo and Rear Window (then very rarely seen for copyright reasons or somesuch). Rear Window is a sublime piece of film-making.

The Third Man is one of my all-time faves that I never tire of watching, and on a day trip to Vienna years ago I had to go on the Ferris Wheel. And I saw Blood Simple on the big screen recently. Fabulous. A left-field choice for analysis might be one of the first, second or fourth Mad Max films.
 

Yithian

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Hitchcock - my vote is for Rear Window. I was never a huge fan of Hitchcock until, during my university film course in 1983 or so, we watched Vertigo and Rear Window (then very rarely seen for copyright reasons or somesuch). Rear Window is a sublime piece of film-making.

The Third Man is one of my all-time faves that I never tire of watching, and on a day trip to Vienna years ago I had to go on the Ferris Wheel. And I saw Blood Simple on the big screen recently. Fabulous. A left-field choice for analysis might be one of the first, second or fourth Mad Max films.
(Fittingly enough) I was rather obsessed with Vertigo and I've seen almost all of the major Hitchcock films. I think from the 'lessons in film-making' perspective, Rear Window probably would be one of the best choices. Notorious could be a fine lesson in ratcheting up the tension unbearably and the 'stagey' films like Rope and Dial M for Murder are classy examples of 'limited' settings.
 

GNC

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The bit in Rear Window when Raymond Burr twigs what is going on and looks straight up at James Stewart by staring right at us in the audience is one of the greatest "uh-oh!" moments in cinema. We're implicated too.
 

escargot

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(Fittingly enough) I was rather obsessed with Vertigo and I've seen almost all of the major Hitchcock films. I think from the 'lessons in film-making' perspective, Rear Window probably would be one of the best choices. Notorious could be a fine lesson in ratcheting up the tension unbearably and the 'stagey' films like Rope and Dial M for Murder are classy examples of 'limited' settings.
I've been trying to remember the title of a Hitchcock fillum. Perhaps you know the answer:

There's a plot where a couple murder a man together. They don't find it easy and at one point, one is holding him round the neck from behind while the other belabours his legs with a shovel. It takes a while for them to subdue him. The point was to show how hard and messy murder can be. Does that ring any bells?
 
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