The Unwhinge Thread

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I had a letter from the HMRC today telling me that I don't owe them the £1650 they said I did last month – this was for late submitting of a self-assessment when they had already accepted that I didn't need to send them one!

Up to the 2015-2016 tax year I was freelance/self-employed and had rental income from a flat, which was then sold and Capital Gains Tax paid. Since then I've been entirely PAYE. I was pretty sure I was right, but it's nice to get the letter! Phew! The drinks are on me today... except for the £4500 spent on the roof. Bah!

Plus my father and brother are now talking after nine months of silence; okay, it was me who found and booked the counsellor (me, the responsible adult, makes a change?!) who has got them talking. That's another glass of chardonnay for me tonight!
You deserve a bottle of chardonnay!
 

Yithian

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I had a letter from the HMRC today telling me that I don't owe them the £1650 they said I did last month – this was for late submitting of a self-assessment when they had already accepted that I didn't need to send them one!

Up to the 2015-2016 tax year I was freelance/self-employed and had rental income from a flat, which was then sold and Capital Gains Tax paid. Since then I've been entirely PAYE. I was pretty sure I was right, but it's nice to get the letter! Phew! The drinks are on me today... except for the £4500 spent on the roof. Bah!

Plus my father and brother are now talking after nine months of silence; okay, it was me who found and booked the counsellor (me, the responsible adult, makes a change?!) who has got them talking. That's another glass of chardonnay for me tonight!
HMRC are entirely unpredictable.

The things that should be simple are often unnecessarily drawn out and the stuff you brace yourself for sometimes go through on a nod.

Most peculiar organisation.

As to the family stuff, pat yourself on the back old chap.
 

Rerenny

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Was she laughing at the recording?
The story goes that one of her sound engineers spoke to her as the piece was playing and said that it sounds like a bee in a jar, and that image played in her head as she tried to carry on with the rest of her job. You can hear other people in the studio laughing, but that's possibly because Charlotte was corpsing so spectacularly.
 

Bad Bungle

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This is supposed to be how penicillin was discovered. Fleming found that petri dishes he'd left out to wash had been forgotten, and the mould that contaminated them had killed off the bacteria he had been growing.
As an aside, a Doctor at one of London Hospitals in the late 1940's tried to emulate Fleming's success by leaving agar plates on an open window sill to see what would grow and if anything inhibited growth. To his surprise the plates remained virtually culture-free and he subsequently discovered that the window sill was sited over a ventillation shaft leading from the Underground. One would think that the London Underground would be a hot-bed of bacteria and mould, given how much human hair and detritus is sucked into the tunnels each day. But actually outside the carriages, the tunnels and tracks are pretty much sterile due to the ozone produced by the live-rail sparking.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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Swifty

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Yesterday my work duty was to hang out with a load of attractive and fun women in their 30's drinking wine in bikinis (the women were in bikinis, not the wine) around a swimming pool in the sunshine listening to 80's rock tunes and then build a bonfire for them later before going home .. I was actually paid to do this .. paid I tell you!? .. I felt like Cromer's Hugh Hefner. I reckon this is God's way of rewarding me for all the shit jobs I've had to do in the past. The Mrs wasn't so impressed.
 

Floyd1

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Yesterday my work duty was to hang out with a load of attractive and fun women in their 30's drinking wine in bikinis (the women were in bikinis, not the wine) around a swimming pool in the sunshine listening to 80's rock tunes and then build a bonfire for them later before going home .. I was actually paid to do this .. paid I tell you!? .. I felt like Cromer's Hugh Hefner. I reckon this is God's way of rewarding me for all the shit jobs I've had to do in the past. The Mrs wasn't so impressed.
I told you that silk dressing gown would come in handy one day.
 

Bigphoot2

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Yesterday my work duty was to hang out with a load of attractive and fun women in their 30's drinking wine in bikinis (the women were in bikinis, not the wine) around a swimming pool in the sunshine listening to 80's rock tunes and then build a bonfire for them later before going home .. I was actually paid to do this .. paid I tell you!? .. I felt like Cromer's Hugh Hefner. I reckon this is God's way of rewarding me for all the shit jobs I've had to do in the past. The Mrs wasn't so impressed.
And then you woke up :p
 

Swifty

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And then you woke up :p
I know! .. I couldn't equate reality with the situation at the time ..

We've got an older grumpy grounds man there, lets call him Bert .. so I said to the women " .. and no pestering Bert for his phone number please ladies, he's a professional tradesman and not just a sex object!" .. I made the owner of the whole place laugh anyway .. my P45's probably in the post now ..
 

Bigphoot2

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I'm a bit concerned that they might all get sunburn Yith. Perhaps I should ask the Mrs to pick up some sun cream (on company expense of course) so I can apply it on them all for good customer service .. I'm back in at 2 ..
Sounds like a tough job, it must be really hard.
 

Yithian

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By pure coincidence (while reading something else online), I discovered a lead that ended up with my identifying former member of my grandfather's battalion during the war. The exciting part is that he left the battalion when he volunteered for special service and I'm 90% certain that he subsequently participated in (and escaped from) the St. Nazaire Raid with 2 Commando (Op. CHARIOT).

It's very difficult turning up reliable records for wartime special service as the records kept were/are a shambles, but this is my second success in this department, having already identified another man who ended up in the "L"-detachment Special Air Service Brigade (the first incarnation of the S.A.S.), but was likely murdered by natives when left critically wounded in the wake of Op. BYGAMY, a failed raid on Benghazi in 1942.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Bigamy

This is what I do online when I'm not here, incidentally, unravelling little narratives, searching through old diaries and scanning lists of names.

May they rest in peace.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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By pure coincidence (while reading something else online), I discovered a lead that ended up with my identifying former member of my grandfather's battalion during the war. The exciting part is that he left the battalion when he volunteered for special service and I'm 90% certain that he subsequently participated in (and escaped from) the St. Nazaire Raid with 2 Commando (Op. CHARIOT).

It's very difficult turning up reliable records for wartime special service as the records kept were/are a shambles, but this is my second success in this department, having already identified another man who ended up in the "L"-detachment Special Air Service Brigade (the first incarnation of the S.A.S.), but was likely murdered by natives when left critically wounded in the wake of Op. BYGAMY, a failed raid on Benghazi in 1942.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Bigamy

This is what I do online when I'm not here, incidentally, unravelling little narratives, searching through old diaries and scanning lists of names.

May they rest in peace.
It sounds really fascinating all this searching into the past and uncovering stuff, that you do.
Must be a really satisfying way to spend your time. :sherlock::reading:

I often wonder what it would be like to research into my family history but I wouldn't know where to start, I don't even know many names (other than my parents of course).
 

Yithian

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It sounds really fascinating all this searching into the past and uncovering stuff, that you do.
Must be a really satisfying way to spend your time. :sherlock::reading:

I often wonder what it would be like to research into my family history but I wouldn't know where to start, I don't even know many names (other than my parents of course).
My wife rolls her eyes, but my daughter brings her pink magnifying glass over and looks at the soldiers.

I started with my grandfather's name, date of birth, service number and half a dozen photographs and I've now got hundreds of GB of 'paperwork' about everything his battalion did from 1939 to 1946--it's the kind of project that will never be completed, but you're right that I find it satisfying.

I don't know very much at all about family genealogy, but I've had a lot of help from other anoraks, and I flatter myself that I've passed a number of leads back to them.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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My wife rolls here eyes, but my daughter brings her pink magnifying glass over and looks at the soldiers.

I started with my grandfather's name, date of birth, service number and half a dozen photographs and I've now got hundreds of GB of 'paperwork' about everything the battalion did from 1939 to 1946--it's the kind of project that will never be completed, but you're right that I find it satisfying.

I don't know very much at all about family genealogy, but I've had a lot of help from other anoraks, and I flatter myself that I've passed a number of leads back to them.
Nice that your daughter is just as interested :)

Sorry to ask questions but; are photographs of war / service personnel quite common? What I mean is, if one knew the name of the person and where they were stationed and rough year(s), is it likely - or - unlikely - be able to find them on a photograph?

I know, for instance, that my grandfather or possibly great-grandfather served in the Boer War. It was mentioned when I was much younger so the memory is hazy.

And I know another family member was stationed in a particular country in - I believe - the 1950s so post-WW2 (I'm gonna do some research to see why they might have been there).

EDIT: Thinking about it, it must've been my great-grandfather in the Boer War.

Not expecting you to find out the details for me of course! Just wondering how likely I'd be to find a photograph or details of them if I were to start digging.
 
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Bigphoot2

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It sounds really fascinating all this searching into the past and uncovering stuff, that you do.
Must be a really satisfying way to spend your time. :sherlock::reading:

I often wonder what it would be like to research into my family history but I wouldn't know where to start, I don't even know many names (other than my parents of course).
I’ve been dabbling in genealogy off and on for about 10 years now and it becomes quite addictive.

The best place to start might be to see if there are any local colleges running courses, that will give you an idea what to do and how to go about it.

Thanks to the interweb there’s lots of stuff online now.

You could try these for starters

https://www.freeukgenealogy.org.uk/

or if you have Scottish ancestors (and all the best people do)

https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/ (but you have to pay for this one)

I’ve also seen a few magazines in WH Smith about family trees but never read any.

If you do decide to give it a try, be prepared for lots of strange coincidences. It can get quite spooky at times. I made contact with a very distant relative in Australia (her father was my grandfather’s cousin) and she sent a photo of her mother – who looked like my mother’s identical twin and not only that, my mother pointed to a lampshade in the picture and said “We had one just like that!”

Another time, I was contacted by a cousin of my mother that she hadn’t seen since the 50s. We sent each other family photos and they replied “We know you!”

I used to work in a teacher training college and my mum’s cousin and his wife were both teachers and would come to courses and meetings on a regular basis and I’d often chatted with them for nearly 20 years without realising we were related.

Also, be wary about relying on family members for accurate information. They’ll often conveniently “forget” certain relatives or embellish stories.
 

Yithian

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Sorry to ask questions but; are photographs of war / service personnel quite common? What I mean is, if one knew the name of the person and where they were stationed and rough year(s), is it likely - or - unlikely - be able to find them on a photograph?

I know, for instance, that my grandfather or possibly great-grandfather served in the Boer War. It was mentioned when I was much younger so the memory is hazy.

And I know another family member was stationed in a particular country in - I believe - the 1950s so post-WW2 (I'm gonna do some research to see why they might have been there).

Not expecting you to find out the details for me of course! Just wondering how likely I'd be to find a photograph or details of them if I were to start digging.
Photographs are very common--reliable labels of who and where they are are much less so. The closer you get to the present, the more likely you are to get a 'hit', but it all depends on what units they were in and what they were up to. Some are extremely well documented, others almost not at all.

Sorry that's so vague. Feel free to send me a message if you would like to discuss specifics.
 

Schrodinger's Zebra

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I’ve been dabbling in genealogy off and on for about 10 years now and it becomes quite addictive.

The best place to start might be to see if there are any local colleges running courses, that will give you an idea what to do and how to go about it.

Thanks to the interweb there’s lots of stuff online now.

You could try these for starters

https://www.freeukgenealogy.org.uk/

or if you have Scottish ancestors (and all the best people do)

https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/ (but you have to pay for this one)

I’ve also seen a few magazines in WH Smith about family trees but never read any.

If you do decide to give it a try, be prepared for lots of strange coincidences. It can get quite spooky at times. I made contact with a very distant relative in Australia (her father was my grandfather’s cousin) and she sent a photo of her mother – who looked like my mother’s identical twin and not only that, my mother pointed to a lampshade in the picture and said “We had one just like that!”

Another time, I was contacted by a cousin of my mother that she hadn’t seen since the 50s. We sent each other family photos and they replied “We know you!”

I used to work in a teacher training college and my mum’s cousin and his wife were both teachers and would come to courses and meetings on a regular basis and I’d often chatted with them for nearly 20 years without realising we were related.

Also, be wary about relying on family members for accurate information. They’ll often conveniently “forget” certain relatives or embellish stories.
Very informative, thank you for that. Very strange about the coincidences/likenesses! (Or perhaps not-so-strange, but you know what I mean).
 
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