The Unwhinge Thread

Yithian

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escargot

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The best Western novels are works of true American literature.

Zane Grey's 1912 Riders of the Purple Sage is generally acknowledged as the first of the genre.
It's a lovely read with elegant prose and interesting characters.

I read it as teenager because it was there and I read everything, and I then went on to read all my Dad's 'cowboy books'.

My father and grandfather used to swap them so there were often new ones available.

Can't remember much about them now except the racism in relation to Native Americans and the brutality of their alleged torture methods, such as the 'gutshot'.

If anyone needs a new genre to explore, the Western is the way forward!
 

cycleboy2

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I ordered half-a-dozen wines from a local supplier last Wednesday. The box turned up Thursday but I only opened it Friday – I'd ordered five chardonnays and a champagne (also a chardonnay and at a massive discount). On opening the box I found four rieslings, a rosé and a Viognier. It took me a while to get in touch with the company as they're very busy and it's now been sorted, and I've done very well out of it.

They've given me a ten-pound voucher, which is nice, but they've also sent two of everything and left the original delivery. So I've got 18 bottles for the price of six and a tenner off! That's a result. I've been a customer of theirs for years and would have been happy with the voucher (and one of the original bottles that I drank as I'd no wine in the house and it was raining; I had told them about that).
 

cycleboy2

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Feeling chuffed today. Went out on the bike this morning with the intention of riding local hills but pouring rain made me change my plans (descending in driving rain in traffic is no fun), so I decided to see if I could beat my recent best time for 40km/25 miles, which was an hour 42 or so. My best-ever time dates back to the 1990s and I'm unlikely to get near one hour, eight minutes again but did manage 01:31:21. This means I should be able to get under 90 minutes, as I had two stops at traffic lights and one lengthy one at a junction, and I didn't turn myself inside out to achieve it. A bit less weight and more training and I'll then aim for an hour 25...

The poor weather meant the Bristol-Bath bike path was virtually empty and I did the return leg with a westerly tailwind that allowed me to ride at around 32kph/20mph, making up for the headwind going out.

When I used to do 10 mile time trials in the 90s I would aim to ride at a heart rate of around 178 – my maximum was then 199, my resting rate below 50 when I was at my fittest. I deliberately haven't worn a heart rate monitor for years but may start again soon. Really serious riders use power meters, and I may go down that route too – but not yet!
 

escargot

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Feeling chuffed today. Went out on the bike this morning with the intention of riding local hills but pouring rain made me change my plans (descending in driving rain in traffic is no fun), so I decided to see if I could beat my recent best time for 40km/25 miles, which was an hour 42 or so. My best-ever time dates back to the 1990s and I'm unlikely to get near one hour, eight minutes again but did manage 01:31:21. This means I should be able to get under 90 minutes, as I had two stops at traffic lights and one lengthy one at a junction, and I didn't turn myself inside out to achieve it. A bit less weight and more training and I'll then aim for an hour 25...

The poor weather meant the Bristol-Bath bike path was virtually empty and I did the return leg with a westerly tailwind that allowed me to ride at around 32kph/20mph, making up for the headwind going out.

When I used to do 10 mile time trials in the 90s I would aim to ride at a heart rate of around 178 – my maximum was then 199, my resting rate below 50 when I was at my fittest. I deliberately haven't worn a heart rate monitor for years but may start again soon. Really serious riders use power meters, and I may go down that route too – but not yet!
What's a power meter? I bet Techy would like one. Is it like a Bullworker?
 

Frideswide

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Where were we talking about academic reviewing? I've just finished one and been told, in the auto reply to my report, that to say thank you I can select $300 worth of e-books from Cambridge University Press!

Especially welcome because it is totally unexpected! I'm sure I didn't get one last time. Maybe you have to do a certain number of relevant peer reviews before it kicks in?
 

Analogue Boy

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The best Western novels are works of true American literature.

Zane Grey's 1912 Riders of the Purple Sage is generally acknowledged as the first of the genre.
It's a lovely read with elegant prose and interesting characters.

I read it as teenager because it was there and I read everything, and I then went on to read all my Dad's 'cowboy books'.

My father and grandfather used to swap them so there were often new ones available.

Can't remember much about them now except the racism in relation to Native Americans and the brutality of their alleged torture methods, such as the 'gutshot'.

If anyone needs a new genre to explore, the Western is the way forward!
The best thing I watched last year was The Ballad of Buster Scruggs. I found it a brilliant, weird portmanteau of spooky tales from the old west.
 

Yithian

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The local government has turned down permission for developers to build 400+ new homes next to the 12th century church in which my wife and I were married. The fields they wanted were woods and farmland between two built-up areas, accessed solely by a road built for horses and little widened since; it would have been carnage. My father (local community association) has been neck-deep in the campaign against it for months (interviews, articles, formal objections, legal advice etc), and although a third of the planning committee still thought it was a jolly good plan, they were mercifully outvoted by normal people. He's delighted and so am I.

Small victory, but a heartening one.
 

escargot

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Long story short: I fixed Techy's bike computer.

Techy LOVES his bike computers. He has two, a basic one and a super-duper top-of-the-range model.

I bought the first one when he started cycling and the second last year when he started needing more facts and statistics. The first one really got him going with the fitness. Best £70 I ever spent! The second was a lot dearer but it gave him a big boost.

Anyway... today he tried to switch on the posh one but it wouldn't boot up. He nearly had a conniption. (What a useful word.)

As the basic one wasn't charged up he went on his usual evening fitness ride without any kind of bike computer, like some kind of animal.

We'd found the box and receipt. It's 15 months old, probably out of guarantee, so I prepared for a big row at Halfords.

In the meantime I looked online for advice from other owners and found that you can reset it by pressing the 'on' button for 15 seconds. Really? Yup. I tried that and it booted up nicely. Can't WAIT to show Techy!

Edit: Techy is STUNNED.
 
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cycleboy2

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We've had roe deer visiting our suburban garden for years but our regular adult female had been absent for 11 days. This wouldn't have been too much of a concern but I saw a dead adult female by the roadside about a mile away... 11 days ago. This would make her roaming area quite large but not absurdly so. Our resident adult female has a distinctive white scar on her right rump but the dead one was on the wrong side (I very nearly got off the bike to turn over a dead deer, but that's every shade of weird and fortunately wasn't necessary!).

Massive relief today: she turns up in our garden – grass, plants, weeds, fallen apples, a veritable feast – with a new fawn. Awww! We hadn't even detected the pregnancy. The last one was really obvious, but then she was carrying two young, which is unusual.

Pics will follow if I can wake up early enough but you've no idea how stupidly happy this made me.
 

pandacracker

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Would be nice to see it when it's finished.

Can you give a link to the artist? I want something similar, a band on my arm representing the yearly cycle of the fire festivals.
 

Skrymr

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Would be nice to see it when it's finished.

Can you give a link to the artist? I want something similar, a band on my arm representing the yearly cycle of the fire festivals.

Are you in the UK? I will message you a link if you are
 

Kondoru

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Viking rather than Celtic.

Id like a tattoo too (not on my head) But cant afford it
 

Skrymr

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Viking rather than Celtic.

Id like a tattoo too (not on my head) But cant afford it
Yeah, I got a book called Nordic tattoo, and another book called Viking Art and have been using those for inspiration to piece future tattoos together :)
 
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