The Vegetarian & Vegan Thread

Floyd1

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I had a pack of fresh cheese'n'onion rolls, like sausage rolls only with cheese and onion instead of sausage meat,
That's reminded me; those sausage rolls that contain 'proper' cheese (ie not vegan cheese), also seem a bit dodgy to me. I'll have one every now and then, but I have my doubts on what the actual 'cheese' really is.
 

escargot

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That's reminded me; those sausage rolls that contain 'proper' cheese (ie not vegan cheese), also seem a bit dodgy to me. I'll have one every now and then, but I have my doubts on what the actual 'cheese' really is.
Speaking as someone who has tasted many cheeses* I find it acceptable if bland.
However, when I've made my own cheese and onion pastries of various kinds I've much preferred the taste and texture.

*Shut up at the back
 

Ogdred Weary

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Speaking as someone who has tasted many cheeses* I find it acceptable if bland.
However, when I've made my own cheese and onion pastries of various kinds I've much preferred the taste and texture.

*Shut up at the back

What is the disgusting gack they put in most cheese and onion pasties? Cos it ain't normal cheese.
 

JamesWhitehead

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uit ain't normal cheese

Perfect filling for a pasty might be a halved, molten Brie, baked with an enclosed layer of onion rings and a light sprinkle of mixed herbs.

I have never, so far, wrapped this high-calorie, unctuous treat with pastry. I have it with toast. But it always seems like the cheese-and-onion pasty filling from heaven! :loveu:
 

Floyd1

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On the subject of cheese, vegetarian or not, (most cheese is vegetarian these days apart from some with Appellation d'origine contrôlée/Denominazione d'Origine Protetta (protected designations of origin), which often use rennet, (like Comte and Parmesan), the first thing to do on getting it home is to take it out of any nasty plastic packaging that it is in and transfer it to some parchment/greaseproof paper so it can breathe. And don't forget to take it out of the fridge at least an hour before consumption.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Perfect filling for a pasty might be a halved, molten Brie, baked with an enclosed layer of onion rings and a light sprinkle of mixed herbs.

I have never, so far, wrapped this high-calorie, unctuous treat with pastry. I have it with toast. But it always seems like the cheese-and-onion pasty filling from heaven! :loveu:

Not sure if Brie is vegetarian, as its close cousin Camembert uses animal rennet during the curdling/clotting process.
Personally I don't think you can beat a good mature farmhouse Cheddar for cooking or snacking.
Cathedral City or Pilgrim's Choice, made with vegetable rennet, are the food of the gods!
 

Nosmo King

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Not sure if Brie is vegetarian, as its close cousin Camembert uses animal rennet during the curdling/clotting process.
Personally I don't think you can beat a good mature farmhouse Cheddar for cooking or snacking.
Cathedral City or Pilgrim's Choice, made with vegetable rennet, are the food of the gods!
I like a good mature cheddar that burns the roof of your mouth and makes you sweat :p
 

ramonmercado

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When vegetarians gain power.

Food has again turned political in India as right-wing politicians call for meat shops to be shut in the capital Delhi during the Hindu festival of Navratri. But the insistence on casting India, or even Hindus, as vegetarian, ignores the country's long and intricate relationship with meat.

"If other communities respect the Hindu festival and welcome the decision, we will also show respect when their festivals will be celebrated," Parvesh Verma, a Delhi MP from the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) which governs India, said.

He suggested closing shops across India through the nine-day festival - which began on 2 April - during which many Hindus fast and abstain from eating meat.

The opposition - including Delhi's government, led by the Aam Aadmi Party - has bristled at the suggestion. It's the first of its kind in the food-loving capital, famous for its buttery sweet chicken curry and smoky, melt-in-the-mouth kebabs.

Mr Verma seems to be ignoring the fact that Ramadan is already under way and meat is a big part of the iftar or evening meal with which Muslims break their fast. But he also appears to believe that meat shops are owned and mostly frequented by Muslims - and that all Hindus across India, or even Delhi, celebrate Navratri.

History, data and lived experience all contradict him. The Indian diet, in its sheer range and ingenuity, defies the easy categories - Hindu or Muslim, vegetarian or non-vegetarian - that the right-wing thrives upon. ...

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-61020025
 

Floyd1

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Not sure if Brie is vegetarian, as its close cousin Camembert uses animal rennet during the curdling/clotting process.
Personally I don't think you can beat a good mature farmhouse Cheddar for cooking or snacking.
Cathedral City or Pilgrim's Choice, made with vegetable rennet, are the food of the gods!
'Président' Brie is (and quite a few other ones too), but not their Camembert - although you can get vegetarian Camembert here. Sainsbury's certainly do one;
https://www.sainsburys.co.uk/gol-ui/product/sainsburys-whole-normandy-camembert-250g
 

Mythopoeika

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Hummus lovers rejoice!

Israeli researcher's hummus chickpeas sprout in space.​

Dr. Yonatan Winetraub confirms legumes have been growing even quicker in space compared to earth, over a month after being launched to International Space Station; adds hummus may become first food to be cultivated on another planet.

https://www.ynetnews.com/environment/article/b1zklpy7q#autoplay
The middle classes and the trendies breathe a collective sigh of relief. They can go into space after all.
 

Floyd1

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The middle classes and the trendies breathe a collective sigh of relief. They can go into space after all.
Yes, along with avocados, which people in other countries have also been eating for years, hummus has gone the same way here now.
 

GNC

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Anglo-Saxon kings were mostly veggie but peasants treated them to huge barbecues, new study argues​

News story

So all those great victories were fuelled by turnips, not a roast goose with a drumstick tossed casually over one shoulder. Unless someone else was paying for the BBQ, that was.
 

Coal

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Try making your own if you haven't already done so. It's far better- and cheaper -than the store bought stuff. Same goes for homemade falafel (although you'll need dried chickpeas for that as tinned just won't work). Soak them for a day or two though.
Homemade! I've found fresh lemon juice is definitely better than bottled. Also good is half a jar of those chargrilled peppers in oil, blitzed in with the other ingredients.

I'd love a good falafel recipe if you have one...
 

Floyd1

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Homemade! I've found fresh lemon juice is definitely better than bottled. Also good is half a jar of those chargrilled peppers in oil, blitzed in with the other ingredients.

I'd love a good falafel recipe if you have one...
Hey C,
Well this is one I use as a 'base', but it really takes a few attempts to get it how you want it, tastewise. Also it isn't rigid- for eg I often use a bit of curry powder instead of cumin and more, less or even no garlic depending on whether I have any in, or what mood I am in.

The key point is that you must used dried chickpeas (that you have soaked in water) and not tinned as they will just not work (especially if you want to deep fry them- which is the best way). Tinned ones will just fall apart once you put them in the oil. You will read how adding flour stops this, but a) it doesn't and b) you will just end up with a greasy, doughey, heavy lump, when they should be light & fluffy.

I like mine to be as 'Israeli' as possible but there are different types for you to try- for eg Egyptian falafel is made with fava beans instead and they are flatter.

Also, as you've mentioned with fresh lemon juice, some say you should only use fresh parsley but I use dried.

Good luck and don't be disheartened if it fails on first attempt. (If you do look up how to make it on youtube etc, make sure the person doing it is Middle Eastern!)

P.s You can do them in the oven if you'd prefer, but they're just not the same imo.

Put all ingredients into a blender until well mixed.
Make into balls (you can buy a 'falafel scoop' to make this easier).

Rest in fridge until just before frying (this will help to ensure your falafel doesn't break apart).
Deep fry in hot oil until golden.

Chickpeas 1 cup (soaked for 24-48 hrs in the fridge)
Parsley 2 tbsp
Cumin 1 tbsp
Coriander seeds (ground) 1 tbsp
Garlic 3 cloves
Lemon juice 1 tbsp
Salt 1 tsp
Flour 1 tbsp
Water if necessary.
 

Coal

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Hey C,
Well this is one I use as a 'base', but it really takes a few attempts to get it how you want it, tastewise. Also it isn't rigid- for eg I often use a bit of curry powder instead of cumin and more, less or even no garlic depending on whether I have any in, or what mood I am in.

The key point is that you must used dried chickpeas (that you have soaked in water) and not tinned as they will just not work (especially if you want to deep fry them- which is the best way). Tinned ones will just fall apart once you put them in the oil. You will read how adding flour stops this, but a) it doesn't and b) you will just end up with a greasy, doughey, heavy lump, when they should be light & fluffy.

I like mine to be as 'Israeli' as possible but there are different types for you to try- for eg Egyptian falafel is made with fava beans instead and they are flatter.

Also, as you've mentioned with fresh lemon juice, some say you should only use fresh parsley but I use dried.

Good luck and don't be disheartened if it fails on first attempt. (If you do look up how to make it on youtube etc, make sure the person doing it is Middle Eastern!)

P.s You can do them in the oven if you'd prefer, but they're just not the same imo.

Put all ingredients into a blender until well mixed.
Make into balls (you can buy a 'falafel scoop' to make this easier).

Rest in fridge until just before frying (this will help to ensure your falafel doesn't break apart).
Deep fry in hot oil until golden.

Chickpeas 1 cup (soaked for 24-48 hrs in the fridge)
Parsley 2 tbsp
Cumin 1 tbsp
Coriander seeds (ground) 1 tbsp
Garlic 3 cloves
Lemon juice 1 tbsp
Salt 1 tsp
Flour 1 tbsp
Water if necessary.
Awesome! Mrs Coal and I thank you. I'll report back...
 

Swifty

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For God's sake Swifty, pull yourself together and tell your kidney stones you've already heard their anecdotes.
Vegetarians used to get on my nerves a bit but then vegans came along *shudder* .. they eat so badly I'm starting to think they've got some sort of wheelchair envy or something? ..

"What's the worst possible lifestyle diet I can adopt while at the same time simultaneously making everyone else around me have to work harder to accommodate that decision? .. ooh! .. I know! .."

Not that I'm bitter or anything.
 
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Floyd1

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@Coal - I thought I'd mention this as well that you and/or some of the others might like to try; Chimichurri, a condiment/baste/marinade from Argentina/Uruguay. It's mainly used on meats over there, but you can use it on anything really. It's a lovely oily, garlicky concoction.
(Again, there are lots of variations out there, many not authentic, but this is the recipe I use, written by an Uruguayan who's Dad made it this way for many years).

I'll post the link so you can get the recipe (and read a bit about it as well if you wish to).
https://cafedelites.com/authentic-chimichurri-uruguay-argentina/
 

Coal

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@Coal - I thought I'd mention this as well that you and/or some of the others might like to try; Chimichurri, a condiment/baste/marinade from Argentina/Uruguay. It's mainly used on meats over there, but you can use it on anything really. It's a lovely oily, garlicky concoction.
(Again, there are lots of variations out there, many not authentic, but this is the recipe I use, written by an Uruguayan who's Dad made it this way for many years).

I'll post the link so you can get the recipe (and read a bit about it as well if you wish to).
https://cafedelites.com/authentic-chimichurri-uruguay-argentina/
Will check that out, many thanks. :hoff:
 

Victory

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No worries. - Just thinking, @Victory might be the chap to advise us on authentic falafel/houmous/middle eastern recipes/spice mixes etc.
I cannot improve upon your recipe.
You have the connoisseurs ingredient that gives falafel the special edge, which is Parsley.

I prefer the outside to be crispy, but the inside to be moist yet retaining consistency of shape, not the "fall apart into an ungainly mess" type of falafel.

Serve at the side of a plate of humus topped with tehina and a touch a paprika (and pine nuts and mushrooms if you have them), with a few sliced fresh peppers for dipping in the humus.
And a touch of Zhug in the middle.

Or "street stall style" inside a sliced warm pitta, where the inside surface of the pitta has a smear of tehina, plus cucumber and tomato salad and a pinch of black pepper and a dash of lemon juice. Again, with a bit of Zhug inside.

It is tempting to put lots of tehina in, but in my opinion this can weaken the pitta and cause the whole thing to collapse.

For those wondering about the spicy paste called Zhug:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhug
 

Floyd1

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It is tempting to put lots of tehina in, but in my opinion this can weaken the pitta and cause the whole thing to collapse.

For those wondering about the spicy paste called Zhug:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhug
They are getting better (slowly) but supermarket pittas here are a pretty dismal affair compared to the large, round, soft, doughy Israeli ones. They are often like cardboard, too small and break apart very easily.
Because of this I usually tend to use wraps instead - *two slightly overlapping by a couple of inches, then rolled tightly together, tucking in at the sides as you go until both wraps are 'joined' together as one (to replicate a laffa).
*Wraps here are usually also too small and thin to replicate proper laffas or burritos when used singularly.

As well as Zhug, amba is another option of course.
 
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Victory

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They are getting better (slowly) but supermarket pittas here are a pretty dismal affair compared to the large, round, soft, doughy Israeli ones. They are often like cardboard, too small and break apart very easily.
B

As well as Zhug, amba is another option of course.

I am spoiled.
I live within a short drive of Jewish bakeries which produce the same round doughy pittas and and larger thinner laffas that one gets in Israel.

Yes Amba. But I did not know that was it's name, I just thought it was a type of sauce that gets chucked in when you order a shwarma!
 
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