The Vultures Are Circling (Greed & Strife Around An Impending Death)

Tempest63

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#1
There is an old boy in the bed opposite me who is quite seriously ill. He has a lady, clearly not a relative, who phones him four or five times a day. He puts the phone on loudspeaker to talk to her and her whole conversation revolves around the mans property, for which she seems to be a key holder. She tells him who in his family she is happy to give access and who she isn’t. Her discussions have caused raised eyebrows and comments from the medical staff as to whether she knows everyone on the ward can hear what she has to say.
Tonight the guy took a turn for the worse and sounded really poorly before they stabilised him again. She phoned half way through the crisis then rolled up forty five minutes later with her son to question this guy again about his property. She said she is so worried about him that her daughter is driving down from some distance tonight with her kids and this key holder will put her up in the sick guys house to save the daughter the cost of a hotel. The nursing staff asked her to leave as it was an hour after visiting time, she left only to roll up again twenty minutes later, apologising to the nursing staff to talk about his house for a further 15 minutes before being ejected once again.
I hope I am wrong but it would appear that this woman’s behaviour seems unashamedly centred solely on getting a piece of the guys home when he pops his clogs.
Has anyone else experienced such brazen behaviour?
 

Victory

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#3
Has anyone else experienced such brazen behaviour?
Yes, sadly.
I hope you can find out who his relatives are, if he has a will, and most importantly make sure they have that will.
Because this other woman will do her best to find that will and lose it or alter it, then claim the property.
I would have no hesitation in calling the police now.

Wishing you a speedy recovery.
 

Austin Popper

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#4
I'm with Victory. Heh, I like the sound of that!

I've seen this bullshit before, different versions of it but it's all the same sort of greedy losers doing their thing. He needs an honest advocate. A doctor can get the pests banished, but it won't stop the grift. I once sat across the table from a soulless real estate agent at my father-in-law's house, one of half a dozen or so family members who obviously despised the wench, but it didn't seem to faze her. Dad was still fully in charge of his business dealings, if not his full faculties. --scuse me.


Had to go outside and spit on the ground. I hope that reator is homeless by now.
 

Tempest63

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#7
The wake of vultures has returned, three hours before visiting time. Mum, daughter, son and grandchildren.
Why they let them in before visiting time is beyond me, especially as they are not even relatives.
I suspect the vultures are doing their best to avoid the guys real relatives.
 

EnolaGaia

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#8
... Why they let them in before visiting time is beyond me, especially as they are not even relatives.
I suspect the vultures are doing their best to avoid the guys real relatives.
Can you explain why you're certain these folks are not relatives?
 

Tempest63

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#9
Can you explain why you're certain these folks are not relatives?
The guy has a daughter who we have met and she lives some distance. She was in from 2 to 8 yesterday, and booked into a hotel last night to be here for visiting hours today. The chief vulture is a near neighbour who looks after his place when away. She is the one just turned up with about six others.
 

Yithian

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#11
I caught up with a very old friend over Christmas. Sadly his father died the previous year--a grand old gent of whom I was very fond. His mother took it badly and has deteriorated, his other siblings are the proverbial chocolate teapots and the old man's affairs were a (legal and literal) mess, so he took it upon himself to seek (minor) legal advice and put matters on a sound legal footing (powers of attorney etc.). His reward for having grasped the nettle is to have been accused of attempting to syphon off funds and finagle a larger share of the eventual inheritance(s).

I almost wrote that 'what money does to people' makes me very angry; but I'll correct that to 'what people let money do to them'.

Personally, I have literally signed away a significant inheritance that was promised exclusively to me (the eldest) in order to split it with my siblings and (multiple) cousins. My motivation was wholly self-centred: I wouldn't be able to look myself in the mirror if I entered into a squabble about a bundle of cash that was never mine in the first place in the wake of the death of my much loved relative(s).

And may the devil royally fuck those people who can.
 

Ogdred Weary

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#12
A colleague, years ago was in a tricky situation: his dad died and left his house exclusively to him (there were two other children) but with a caveat that he dad's current partner could live in it until she died if she liked. He was sort of relieved about this caveat, as the died dad not speaking to one of his daughters and the other daughter wasn't speaking to my workmate. I think he was planning to split it three ways when it was eventually his.
 

Frasier Buddolph

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#13
Sadly, this kind of behavior is not rare.

When my dad passed after spending his last few years in an assisted living facility (where he was safe, comfortable, and well cared for), the assistant manager of the facility delicately approached me and my siblings about some money (about $3000) dad owed her for extra help and services she had provided in addition to what was provided by the facility. She led us to believe that this had been a contractual arrangement, very much in order. We told her to submit an itemized accounting to the estate, and she would be taken care of. Well, no accounting was forthcoming, just a series of weepy notes reminding us how much she needed the money. When it was obvious we were not just going to cough up, the notes got nasty and insulting. I was ready to forward her notes to the owner of the facility and, with any luck, get her fired, but my sister got in ahead of me and spoke to the owner. The assistant manager got off with a stern warning. Turns out she had been pulling this scam on people for years.

Oh, and then there was the collection agency who came after us for a non-existent credit card account of dad's. Because they were such sympathetic souls, they were willing to settle for half the amount owed if we settled immediately. These cockroaches figure that bereaved families will be feeling fragile and pay off just to make the calls and letters stop. Makes me want to believe in Hell . . .

When a family member passes, you can expect to be approached by such lowlifes. Be aware and on guard.
 

Lb8535

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#14
The wake of vultures has returned, three hours before visiting time. Mum, daughter, son and grandchildren.
Why they let them in before visiting time is beyond me, especially as they are not even relatives.
I suspect the vultures are doing their best to avoid the guys real relatives.
The other patients might ask the staff to have the .manager forbid admitting anyone outside of visiring hours because its disruptive. Also. In the US its the responsibility of medical personnel to report suspected elder abuse to the police. This would certainly count. If the cops call on the neighbor she might be scared off. And tell the daughter...
 

cycleboy2

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#16
I caught up with a very old friend over Christmas. Sadly his father died the previous year--a grand old gent of whom I was very fond. His mother took it badly and has deteriorated, his other siblings are the proverbial chocolate teapots and the old man's affairs were a (legal and literal) mess, so he took it upon himself to seek (minor) legal advice to put matters on a sound legal footing (powers of attorney etc.). His reward for having grasped the nettle is to have been accused of attempting to syphon off funds and finagle a larger share of the eventual inheritance(s).

I almost wrote that 'what money does to people' makes me very angry; but I'll correct that to 'what people let money do to them'.

Personally, I have literally signed away a significant inheritance that was promised exclusively to me (the eldest) in order to split it with my siblings and (multiple) cousins. My motivation was wholly self-centred: I wouldn't be able to look myself in the mirror if I entered into a squabble about a bundle of cash that was never mine in the first place in the wake of the death of my much loved relative(s).

And may the devil royally fuck those people who can.
Last year I thought my father might write my brother out of his will – and I told him in no uncertain terms that if he did, I'd just give my brother anyway. It turned out he wasn't going to but like you, I couldn't have faced that.

Relating to this issue generally, I find the amount of money my parents have depressing; they've worked hard all their life and saved and now have loads of money squirreled away that they're not healthy enough to enjoy. It's saddening. More positively, my brother, myself and my wife have Lasting Power of Attorney for both my parents (finance for all three of us; health and welfare for my brother and I). This was the best thing we ever did and I urge everybody in a potentially similar situation to do the same; my 85-year-old father has all sorts of physical issues including a serious heart complaint; my mum has physical issues and dementia.

My father just about appreciates the work we do (sometimes) but that's a different whinge for another day! I'm off to the counsellor now to discuss such matters (that's not a joke, by the way, and it's helping a lot).

But yes, there are a lot of venal, selfish people out there! Depressing, isn't it!
 

Tempest63

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#17
I caught up with a very old friend over Christmas. Sadly his father died the previous year--a grand old gent of whom I was very fond. His mother took it badly and has deteriorated, his other siblings are the proverbial chocolate teapots and the old man's affairs were a (legal and literal) mess, so he took it upon himself to seek (minor) legal advice to put matters on a sound legal footing (powers of attorney etc.). His reward for having grasped the nettle is to have been accused of attempting to syphon off funds and finagle a larger share of the eventual inheritance(s).

I almost wrote that 'what money does to people' makes me very angry; but I'll correct that to 'what people let money do to them'.

Personally, I have literally signed away a significant inheritance that was promised exclusively to me (the eldest) in order to split it with my siblings and (multiple) cousins. My motivation was wholly self-centred: I wouldn't be able to look myself in the mirror if I entered into a squabble about a bundle of cash that was never mine in the first place in the wake of the death of my much loved relative(s).

And may the devil royally fuck those people who can.
I have 4 children from my first marriage a couple of pensions, nothing substantial to currently retire on and sweet FA in savings. The house doesn’t have a mortgage. My kids are very supportive, they know that everything I have is willed to the second and current wife of 12 years and vice versa. Should my wife pre-decease me the will would be changed to benefit my 4 kids when I fall off the perch, if I pre-decease her I don’t know what she has planned, but she has hinted it will all be sold off for guide dogs for the blind. There will be no bickering!
 

Austin Popper

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#18
My mother's family was the complete opposite of the squabbling siblings one hears so much about. The house they all grew up in sat empty for a year or more after Grandma died. Nobody seemed to want to deal with it, and no one wanted anything out of it, even the stuff that had been left to them specifically. I don't recall who was paying the bills, probably my mother. Eventually one of my sisters bought the place, and she had an awful time trying to get her aunts and uncles to come get their stuff. She finally had to actually deliver some of it!
 

maximus otter

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#19
Everybody: Make a ****ing will!

My dad died intestate about ten years ago, and l ended up having to infer his wishes from scribblings on two scraps of A6 paper he’d torn from a notebook. Awkward if one is dealing with £50 and “Who gets the cheeny dugs?”; a royal pain in the arse when disbursing a five-digit sum of money.

So: Make a ****ing will! (And get lasting powers of attorney).

maximus otter
 

Lord Lucan

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#21
Oh, and then there was the collection agency who came after us for a non-existent credit card account of dad's. Because they were such sympathetic souls, they were willing to settle for half the amount owed if we settled immediately. These cockroaches figure that bereaved families will be feeling fragile and pay off just to make the calls and letters stop. Makes me want to believe in Hell . . .
That's truly disgusting. May I ask what country this happened in?
 

Frasier Buddolph

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#22
That's truly disgusting. May I ask what country this happened in?
This happened in the U.S.. We told them that they could file a claim against the estate if they wanted, but, of course, they didn't. I think that if I had been silly enough to send them money just because they asked for it, that would be on me. If they had filed a claim against the estate, that would have opened them up to fraud charges.
 

Ger

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#23
There is an old boy in the bed opposite me who is quite seriously ill. He has a lady, clearly not a relative, who phones him four or five times a day. He puts the phone on loudspeaker to talk to her and her whole conversation revolves around the mans property, for which she seems to be a key holder. She tells him who in his family she is happy to give access and who she isn’t. Her discussions have caused raised eyebrows and comments from the medical staff as to whether she knows everyone on the ward can hear what she has to say.
Tonight the guy took a turn for the worse and sounded really poorly before they stabilised him again. She phoned half way through the crisis then rolled up forty five minutes later with her son to question this guy again about his property. She said she is so worried about him that her daughter is driving down from some distance tonight with her kids and this key holder will put her up in the sick guys house to save the daughter the cost of a hotel. The nursing staff asked her to leave as it was an hour after visiting time, she left only to roll up again twenty minutes later, apologising to the nursing staff to talk about his house for a further 15 minutes before being ejected once again.
I hope I am wrong but it would appear that this woman’s behaviour seems unashamedly centred solely on getting a piece of the guys home when he pops his clogs.
Has anyone else experienced such brazen behaviour?
How sad .
 

Tempest63

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#25
Just a quick catch up. I left the hospital yesterday evening but before I left the sick guy was told that previous cancer treatment had failed and it had spread widely, they told him he may only have 6 weeks left. The chief vulture was with him when he was given the news; I heard through the drawn curtain as did the other two guys on the four bed ward.
The mans daughter appeared with his grandchildren and there was a lot of hugging and tears outside the ward but a brave face put on by all in his presence.
Chief vulture was of the opinion that he should go home and spend his remaining days at home and she would help care for him along with any other agency, ie McMillan.
The family felt that due to his reliance on oxygen and a nebuliser he would be better off in a hospice. This debate went back and forth until an elderly matriarchal figure arrived who I took to be his sister. No idea why but the brother sister thing and their ages seemed to sit right from where I was observing.
When the matriarch arrived she took complete control, his daughter and grandkids were extremely pleased she was there and was running the show, the conversations taking place openly and in his presence (and overheard by the rest of us in the ward) stopped and discussions took place out of earshot.
Chief vulture disappeared immediately upon arrival of the matriarchal figure!

I had to go back to the ward today to pick up medication that the pharmacy couldn't have ready for my discharge yesterday. The sick guy was gone. Home or hospice I know not, but there is a hospice in the hospital grounds that would enable a swift transfer.
I can only hope he has kind and gentle passing when the short time he has left draws to a close.
It was very strange to have been privy to this end stage of this mans life when he and I never passed a word between us. Bit like being in the audience of a short drama.
 

Lb8535

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#28
My mother's family was the complete opposite of the squabbling siblings one hears so much about. The house they all grew up in sat empty for a year or more after Grandma died. Nobody seemed to want to deal with it, and no one wanted anything out of it, even the stuff that had been left to them specifically. I don't recall who was paying the bills, probably my mother. Eventually one of my sisters bought the place, and she had an awful time trying to get her aunts and uncles to come get their stuff. She finally had to actually deliver some of it!
Similarly, a friend of mine in New York was in physical receipt of the effects of her mother in law because she lived closest. Silver, jewelry, large weighty 20's furniture, vintage clothing, furs. Mom liked to spend. She asked her two sisters in law for years to come share it out. Finally they arranged trips from Toronto and LA and set a time to sit down together. Her husband would have nothing to do with the sharing. When my friend arrived home from work a little late she found they had started without her. My friend called me furious. So they all finished and went back to their homes and left all the stuff in NY in my friends garage. Years passed and one sister died. My friend sent out one warning, took what she wanted, and called Goodwill to get the rest. People are unbalanced about inheritance. I and most of my friends are deaquisitioning, and the house goes to a charity and I've made this public just to make sure that my relations are not tempted to nehave badly.
 
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#29
I can relate to this.

After my Mother's death my Father met a lady friend at bereavement classes.
When he became ill, and went into hospital for a week, she told him he could move in with her when he came out.
Unbeknown to me, she spent the week emptying his house and taking whatever she thought was of value to her house, she then rented the house out so he couldn't move back if he wanted to.

A few months later he died, and she refused to hand over the will and any documents related to his assets, she even told me to stop contacting her. I eventually managed to take back control of his assets and distribute them according to his wishes.

The worst part was the night he passed away, I turned up to visit and they were trying to resuscitate him but it was too late.
His lady friend then turned up at the bedside, and all she was interested in were the watch and ring that she'd given him; we took them off of him and she quickly pocketed them.
I also found out that the hospital hadn't called me, or told me how ill he was, because she'd told them that she was his wife and everything should go through her. He died of a massive heart attack when she told him he had lung cancer just before I arrived, we had no clue.

At his funeral, which she offered nothing for but made many demands, she went around telling everyone that they were going to get married; I know that this wasn't the case.

A few months after the funeral she met someone else and is probably in the process of fleecing him.

If I never see her again it will be too soon...
 

GNC

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#30
I'm not sure what's Fortean about this thread, but it does make me worry for humanity. Or worry for the side of humanity who get preyed upon by the other side.
 
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