The Whinge Thread, Resurrected

brownmane

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I have recommended this to so many of my friends and colleagues – I'm 56 and my parents are 85 and everybody (literally) I work with is younger than me, so most of them have yet to reach the time when it's an issue. But I have suggested strongly to anybody who'll listen that it's worth considering. My wife had to sort out her uncle's affairs after he went into a home – but no power of attorney had been arranged. The whole process then is much, much more difficult and bureaucratic.

In my parents' case, we also found they had much more money than either we or they expected... much more. There were a dozen or so ISAs, shares, wouldn't have been surprised if there was cash under the mattresses...
It is always worth the money.
 

EnolaGaia

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Another important aspect to establishing a formal power of attorney (POA) status ...

At least here in the USA, formal appointment of POA status establishes legal obligations and responsibilities pertaining to the person given POA privileges. The POA is ultimately responsible to the legal system, and any disputes or irregularities can be sorted out in court rather than being left to fester as interpersonal conflicts potentially causing bad blood or even bloodshed.
 

EnolaGaia

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What is the point in having long and involved passwords that I can't remember and have to write down?
To make it adequately difficult for anyone else to guess or otherwise identify the keys to your online assets and privileges.
 

EnolaGaia

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But if I lose the magic book they'll have them all anyway.
There are such things as "password manager" utilities and apps that allow you to record all your passwords and invoke them as needed (with differing degrees of automatic entry).
 

Yithian

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Whinge ahoy: I've waited since July for the researcher who copies files for me at the National Archives to complete my latest list of requests. That's not a whinge, he's busy and does a great job.

The problem is that the staff at Kew have buggered up and although tne researcher requested the correct files using the catalogue references I gave him, they misread the numbers on two consecutive files: 5s instead of 6s.

The difference means I now have random documentation about the British government of Hamburg in 1946 instead of the diaries of the RASC HQ in Hong in 1949!
 

JamesWhitehead

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Not sure if this is Whinge or Oh the Irony territory . . .

My BT complaint continues and has been escalated. I can expect a phone call from a Manager in the next 48 hours!

I sat up and took notice when Comfortably Numb alerted us all to a £15 BT Wi-Fi only package:

"Just a note to add that you do not require any BT equipment for that WiFi package - only need a nearby BT WiFi connection. You can sign up online and have instant access."

BT had been offering me a £30 a month package and the negotiator was genuinely unaware of the BT FON option, as it is called.

I assumed it had its own street-level, hopefully fibre-optic hubs. It turns out it does not but runs piggy-back on the hubs of existing BT-users.

They use the term "hot-spots." Buried somewhere, there is a screen for users to opt-out of this hosting but I don't think there is much awareness of it.

My proposal to pull the plug on the landline and go for FON would remove one of the two hot-spots in the street!

If the other hub-owner, visible on my system, thought to make the same move . . . :rollingw:

So! BT had been charging me over £ridiculous per annum for their worst-possible deal, while casual users could access my hub for as much as £5 an hour per session or as little as £180 per annum on the 1-year DD deal.

I think they can make me a better offer to resolve this, though legally caveat emptor may apply. :rolleyes:
 
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Yithian

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Not sure if this is Whinge or Oh the Irony territory . . .

My BT complaint continues and has been escalated. I can expect a phone call from a Manager in the next 48 hours!

I sat up and took notice when Comfortably Numb alerted us all to a £15 BT Wi-Fi only package:

"Just a note to add that you do not require any BT equipment for that WiFi package - only need a nearby BT WiFi connection. You can sign up online and have instant access."

BT had been offering me a £30 a month package and the negotiator was genuinely unaware of the BT FON option, as it is called.

I assumed it had its own street-level, hopefully fibre-optic hubs. It turns out it does not but runs piggy-back on the hubs of existing BT-users.

My proposal to pull the plug on the landline and go for FON would remove one of the two hot-spots in the street!

If the other hub-owner thought to make the same move . . . :rollingw:

So! BT had been charging me over £ridiculous per annum for their worst-possible deal, while casual users could access my hub for as much as £5 an hour per session or as little as £180 per annum on the 1-year DD deal.

I think they can make me a better offer to resolve this, though legally caveat emptor may apply. :rolleyes:
Unionise: find the other hub-provider and threaten to pull your custom in tandem if they don't cough up a more attractive deal.
 

INT21

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Virgin media have a similar Virgin hub system. For other Virgin users.

But I see two snags.

First, it isn't mandatory of the user to allow their hubs to be used; they can opt out.

And secondly, what happens if the hub owner that you use turns it off ?

INT21.
 

JamesWhitehead

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First, it isn't mandatory of the user to allow their hubs to be used; they can opt out.
Yes, it's an option well-hidden from view in BT's case. I think they are hoping the FON option will bring in new users on-the-move, while leaving existing landline folk in the dark.

I doubt if casual users in this area are going to be bringing in £43,800 per annum for BT from my hub! But that is the theoretical maximum per user!

Can any technical bod enlighten me as to whether the hub's performance would be affected by multiple users logged-in?

I doubt if hitch-hiking users have actually been pushing up my bills but I think quite a lot of users would be tempted to turn off access, once they learn about this curious business. :thought:
 

INT21

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I don't think it effects the bill of the hub owner.

As for the effect of many people using the hub, yes, there will be a 'latency' effect that will possibly slow things down a bit. But due to things like cache on the machines involved, it probably won't be noticeable mos tof the time.
 

Mythopoeika

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Not sure if this is Whinge or Oh the Irony territory . . .

My BT complaint continues and has been escalated. I can expect a phone call from a Manager in the next 48 hours!

I sat up and took notice when Comfortably Numb alerted us all to a £15 BT Wi-Fi only package:

"Just a note to add that you do not require any BT equipment for that WiFi package - only need a nearby BT WiFi connection. You can sign up online and have instant access."

BT had been offering me a £30 a month package and the negotiator was genuinely unaware of the BT FON option, as it is called.

I assumed it had its own street-level, hopefully fibre-optic hubs. It turns out it does not but runs piggy-back on the hubs of existing BT-users.

They use the term "hot-spots." Buried somewhere, there is a screen for users to opt-out of this hosting but I don't think there is much awareness of it.

My proposal to pull the plug on the landline and go for FON would remove one of the two hot-spots in the street!

If the other hub-owner thought to make the same move . . . :rollingw:

So! BT had been charging me over £ridiculous per annum for their worst-possible deal, while casual users could access my hub for as much as £5 an hour per session or as little as £180 per annum on the 1-year DD deal.

I think they can make me a better offer to resolve this, though legally caveat emptor may apply. :rolleyes:
That would prompt me to use another provider.
 

JamesWhitehead

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That would prompt me to use another provider.
I know that other ISPs offer deals as low as £16 per month without losing the landline and retaining email addresses etc.

It was never obvious to me before that competitors' headline rates were inclusive, though I knew I was paying top-whack with BT.

It's called an abusive-relationship with a company and, though I hate victim-speak, I may need to become fluent. :buck:
 
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GingerTabby

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My whinge concerns the performance (or non-performance) of the new light rapid transit (LRT) system in Bytown-on-the-Rideau. After years of planning and months of testing, the first phase of the LRT officially opened on Sept. 14th. This initial phase consists of a modest 12.5 kilometres of track running east-west through the city centre. For three weeks after the official opening the city continued to run buses, including rush hour express buses, along side the rail route in order to give commuters time to adapt to the change. That parallel bus service ended last Sunday. This week, all hell broke loose. For three consecutive days, the morning rush hour commute was seriously disrupted when a train malfunctioned and caused the entire LRT network to shut down. On two of those three days the cause of the malfunction was a passenger trying to push the train doors open. It beggars belief that an action that simple can result in the temporary closure of the entire rail line. Apparently the transit authority would like commuters to think that no other city on the planet has ever experienced this problem. Alstom, the manufacturer of the rail cars, has been in business for over ninety years so presumably they know how to safeguard their rolling stock against passengers who play silly beggars with the doors. No doubt something is going on at the transit authority that hasn't been made public.

I live in the city centre and my day job is in the south-west of the city. Before the opening of the LRT, I took a 45-minute ride on an express bus to and from the burbs. In theory, I should still be able to arrive at work in just under one hour. I walk ten minutes to the LRT station, spend about that much time on the train to the western terminus of the rail line and then connect with either of the two buses which serve my work location. During this week's three mornings of transit turmoil it took me nearly two hours to arrive at the office. Since the LRT wasn't functioning I was obliged to take a milk-run bus to the western terminus. Unfortunately, I had to wait more than thirty minutes each day for a connection because buses were being diverted to take passengers from that station downtown. Apparently some passengers walked downtown. Luckily for them, the weather was very nice this week.

I'm beginning to think that a donkey might be a more efficient mode of transportation than the LRT. The parking at my day job is free so I could tie equus asinus to the fence in the morning and bring out grain for his/her lunch. The security guards might have something to say about that arrangement, however.

The following satirical article sums up this week's experience: https://www.thebeaverton.com/2019/1...tawa-commuters-leave-for-work-a-week-earlier/
 

Iris

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brownmane I often wonder about indicators as well. When exiting my court I now wait if a car has it on to turn left, having nearly had a crash when a driver simply went on to the next court and turned.
Now I can't even trust that a car will turn into the street set slightly to the right as after coming out when I spotted one with the indicator to turn right in a long line of passing traffic, I turned left only to be blasted by that same driver.
I wondered if perhaps they were turning into one of the houses to the right, but no, the indicator was on till 2 streets past mine when they turned it off and went left.
I have to be on edge all the time lately as those who do indicate often can't tell left from right and others never bother to use them at all.
 

cycleboy2

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Just watched England beat Bulgaria 6-0. All well and good, but the match was stopped twice for racist chanting – this is 2019, not the 1970s. There were monkey chants, there were Nazi salutes. Disgraceful, disgraceful, disgraceful! I know that we as a country are not blemish-free in this regard, but this stadium was half-closed as a punishment before this game for previous racist action by Bulgarian fans. Bulgaria have to be thrown out and/or they should play all their games behind closed doors and be fined a squillion quid. Nazi salutes, 2019. I give up hope for the history of humanity sometimes (I studied German history at university).
 
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