The Whinge Thread, Resurrected

maximus otter

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I am short one deer carcase.

I went out on the farm this morning, and what a lovely morning it was: bright sunshine, flat calm with just a hint of frost remaining in the shadows. I even saw a lark, ascending, though he didn't favour me with a song.

I thought I was going to put a nice roebuck into my landowner's fridge, but he ambled through a hedge; by the time I could bulldoze through the same hedge, Mr. R. Buck was nowhere to be seen.

Then: result! A muntjac scuttling along a hedgeline 160 yards ahead. He was heading towards my left, but turned at right angles and began to approach me. I set up on my quad sticks and waited. The munty walked to within about 75 yards of me, then turned sharply to my left to enter the hedge. I shouted "Oi!", and he paused at 90° to me for the perfect broadside-on shot. I squeezed the trigger, and had a snap vision of a cloud of water vapour above the deer.

When I had ejected the fired case and fed a fresh round into the chamber, I applied the safety and walked to the area where I'd seen him. And I could not find a damn thing.

Long story short: I spent 45 minutes combing the hedge area, but not finding so much as a drop of blood or a tuft of brittle deer hair. I can't believe that I missed a shot like that, at close range off sticks. I can only assume that the carcase rolled down into the bramble-choked ditch, then the impenetrable (by me) thorns closed over it.

I am doubly annoyed, as not only have I short-changed the farmer who does me a great favour by allowing me to stalk on his land free of charge, but I have disrespected my quarry by not being able to retrieve it and use it.

Not a happy bunny.

maximus otter
 

Lb8535

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I am short one deer carcase.

I went out on the farm this morning, and what a lovely morning it was: bright sunshine, flat calm with just a hint of frost remaining in the shadows. I even saw a lark, ascending, though he didn't favour me with a song.

I thought I was going to put a nice roebuck into my landowner's fridge, but he ambled through a hedge; by the time I could bulldoze through the same hedge, Mr. R. Buck was nowhere to be seen.

Then: result! A muntjac scuttling along a hedgeline 160 yards ahead. He was heading towards my left, but turned at right angles and began to approach me. I set up on my quad sticks and waited. The munty walked to within about 75 yards of me, then turned sharply to my left to enter the hedge. I shouted "Oi!", and he paused at 90° to me for the perfect broadside-on shot. I squeezed the trigger, and had a snap vision of a cloud of water vapour above the deer.

When I had ejected the fired case and fed a fresh round into the chamber, I applied the safety and walked to the area where I'd seen him. And I could not find a damn thing.

Long story short: I spent 45 minutes combing the hedge area, but not finding so much as a drop of blood or a tuft of brittle deer hair. I can't believe that I missed a shot like that, at close range off sticks. I can only assume that the carcase rolled down into the bramble-choked ditch, then the impenetrable (by me) thorns closed over it.

I am doubly annoyed, as not only have I short-changed the farmer who does me a great favour by allowing me to stalk on his land free of charge, but I have disrespected my quarry by not being able to retrieve it and use it.

Not a happy bunny.

maximus otter
Don't be so annoyed. You really just let a wounded animal wander off to a painful death.. Of course it's possible that you missed.
 

titch

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I am short one deer carcase.

I went out on the farm this morning, and what a lovely morning it was: bright sunshine, flat calm with just a hint of frost remaining in the shadows. I even saw a lark, ascending, though he didn't favour me with a song.

I thought I was going to put a nice roebuck into my landowner's fridge, but he ambled through a hedge; by the time I could bulldoze through the same hedge, Mr. R. Buck was nowhere to be seen.

Then: result! A muntjac scuttling along a hedgeline 160 yards ahead. He was heading towards my left, but turned at right angles and began to approach me. I set up on my quad sticks and waited. The munty walked to within about 75 yards of me, then turned sharply to my left to enter the hedge. I shouted "Oi!", and he paused at 90° to me for the perfect broadside-on shot. I squeezed the trigger, and had a snap vision of a cloud of water vapour above the deer.

When I had ejected the fired case and fed a fresh round into the chamber, I applied the safety and walked to the area where I'd seen him. And I could not find a damn thing.

Long story short: I spent 45 minutes combing the hedge area, but not finding so much as a drop of blood or a tuft of brittle deer hair. I can't believe that I missed a shot like that, at close range off sticks. I can only assume that the carcase rolled down into the bramble-choked ditch, then the impenetrable (by me) thorns closed over it.

I am doubly annoyed, as not only have I short-changed the farmer who does me a great favour by allowing me to stalk on his land free of charge, but I have disrespected my quarry by not being able to retrieve it and use it.

Not a happy bunny.

maximus otter
On the bright side I heard there is a new breed of dog, its been selected specially to sniff out crap shots.


dogs-sense-of-smell-01.width-800.jpg
 

Yithian

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Daughter's Easter present/chocolate arrived today.

You might have noticed that it's not Easter.

It's not that I'm annoyed about the two-month-five-day delivery period by airmail--extenuating circumstances fully granted--it's simply that every time I contacted the Royal Mail they refused to go into specifics and just repeated the same meaningless phrases.

I later found out that business customers had been advised of a 6 to 8 week delay, but this has not been revealed to peasants posting personal parcels.
 

GNC

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My mum ordered Easter cards for her friends that arrived with her last week (!).
 

ramonmercado

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I am short one deer carcase.

I went out on the farm this morning, and what a lovely morning it was: bright sunshine, flat calm with just a hint of frost remaining in the shadows. I even saw a lark, ascending, though he didn't favour me with a song.

I thought I was going to put a nice roebuck into my landowner's fridge, but he ambled through a hedge; by the time I could bulldoze through the same hedge, Mr. R. Buck was nowhere to be seen.

Then: result! A muntjac scuttling along a hedgeline 160 yards ahead. He was heading towards my left, but turned at right angles and began to approach me. I set up on my quad sticks and waited. The munty walked to within about 75 yards of me, then turned sharply to my left to enter the hedge. I shouted "Oi!", and he paused at 90° to me for the perfect broadside-on shot. I squeezed the trigger, and had a snap vision of a cloud of water vapour above the deer.

When I had ejected the fired case and fed a fresh round into the chamber, I applied the safety and walked to the area where I'd seen him. And I could not find a damn thing.

Long story short: I spent 45 minutes combing the hedge area, but not finding so much as a drop of blood or a tuft of brittle deer hair. I can't believe that I missed a shot like that, at close range off sticks. I can only assume that the carcase rolled down into the bramble-choked ditch, then the impenetrable (by me) thorns closed over it.

I am doubly annoyed, as not only have I short-changed the farmer who does me a great favour by allowing me to stalk on his land free of charge, but I have disrespected my quarry by not being able to retrieve it and use it.

Not a happy bunny.

maximus otter
I reckon it was a timeslip/teleportation. Remember Swifty's story about his first day in Cromer when a wounded munty ran into him?

I
 

michael59

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So, it has been 6 months since I quit smoking cigarettes. The upside is I have lots more money.

The downside is I still crave them like I did on day one of quitting. Everyday all day. As soon as I open my eyes in the morning, I want a smoke and it doesn't let up. I don't understand why the craving won't subside. :headbang:

In the meantime, I have gained 25lbs ! I didn't even realize it until the other day when I wanted to cross my legs and couldn't do it properly! :omg:

Does that sound like a fair trade to anyone? :mad:
 

Naughty_Felid

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So, it has been 6 months since I quit smoking cigarettes. The upside is I have lots more money.

The downside is I still crave them like I did on day one of quitting. Everyday all day. As soon as I open my eyes in the morning, I want a smoke and it doesn't let up. I don't understand why the craving won't subside. :headbang:

In the meantime, I have gained 25lbs ! I didn't even realize it until the other day when I wanted to cross my legs and couldn't do it properly! :omg:

Does that sound like a fair trade to anyone? :mad:
Why did you give up in the first place?
 

Naughty_Felid

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So, it has been 6 months since I quit smoking cigarettes. The upside is I have lots more money.

The downside is I still crave them like I did on day one of quitting. Everyday all day. As soon as I open my eyes in the morning, I want a smoke and it doesn't let up. I don't understand why the craving won't subside. :headbang:

In the meantime, I have gained 25lbs ! I didn't even realize it until the other day when I wanted to cross my legs and couldn't do it properly! :omg:

Does that sound like a fair trade to anyone? :mad:
https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/...hange-in-response-to-high-levels-of-nicotine/

From a physical/physicological view yes the cravings will go away - eventually. However, you may need to "replace" the habit with a healthier habit. The best, if you can, is obviously exercise.
 

michael59

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Why did you give up in the first place?
Hi Naughty_Felid, thanks for responding. I am answering both your posts in this one below. :) It's a bit whiny and you'll probably wish you hadn't asked. lol

Well, I suppose it was for 3 reasons mainly, there are others but the main ones being that I am of poor health, only have half a working heart and the coughing was putting me at risk for my 14th heart attack. Secondly, I was paying more monthly for my addiction than I am paying for rent. The price for cigarettes is obscene. And 3, it is the only thing that I have never been able to drop as a habit in my lifetime so I was determined with the price being so high that I give it up. I have tried so many times already and never made it past 6 weeks.

I made myself a promise that I will never smoke another cigarette in my life. I intend to honor that promise but, man, it has been so tough. Way tougher than I ever expected and with my health, I cannot afford to gain weight because getting overheated can also give me another heart attack, which means I am not allowed to exercise. I am also in menopause and that give me hot flashes. Lucky, hot flashes don't last long enough to put me in danger of another attack but, it completely drains my energy when I am over heated. I also have a back problem along with hip ailments.

In other words I am old and falling apart. :rolleyes:
 

Naughty_Felid

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Hi Naughty_Felid, thanks for responding. I am answering both your posts in this one below. :) It's a bit whiny and you'll probably wish you hadn't asked. lol

Well, I suppose it was for 3 reasons mainly, there are others but the main ones being that I am of poor health, only have half a working heart and the coughing was putting me at risk for my 14th heart attack. Secondly, I was paying more monthly for my addiction than I am paying for rent. The price for cigarettes is obscene. And 3, it is the only thing that I have never been able to drop as a habit in my lifetime so I was determined with the price being so high that I give it up. I have tried so many times already and never made it past 6 weeks.

I made myself a promise that I will never smoke another cigarette in my life. I intend to honor that promise but, man, it has been so tough. Way tougher than I ever expected and with my health, I cannot afford to gain weight because getting overheated can also give me another heart attack, which means I am not allowed to exercise. I am also in menopause and that give me hot flashes. Lucky, hot flashes don't last long enough to put me in danger of another attack but, it completely drains my energy when I am over heated. I also have a back problem along with hip ailments.

In other words I am old and falling apart. :rolleyes:
So essentially smoking again isn't an option.

So how do you usually get through the cravings? You've done 6 Months which is phenomenal. How have you managed that?
 
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Swifty

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So, it has been 6 months since I quit smoking cigarettes. The upside is I have lots more money.

The downside is I still crave them like I did on day one of quitting. Everyday all day. As soon as I open my eyes in the morning, I want a smoke and it doesn't let up. I don't understand why the craving won't subside. :headbang:

In the meantime, I have gained 25lbs ! I didn't even realize it until the other day when I wanted to cross my legs and couldn't do it properly! :omg:

Does that sound like a fair trade to anyone? :mad:
Suddenly giving up any dangerous drug habit is never a good idea without medical professional supervision .. I'm a smoker who's slowed down by using rolling tobacco, cigarette papers and filter tips instead .. you'll probably find that if you do the same thing, you'll smoke less frequently because it requires time and effort to make the things and that's something we haven't got a lot of time to do at the moment .. so it's a 'the glass is half full' temporary solution only .. the added bonus of rolling your own is that there's less other weird chemicals you're inhaling and it's a LOT cheaper .. and every cigarette you'll smoke is going to be less than half the size of manufactured cigarettes .. then finally quitting for good would become easier for people .. so you've done it hardcore instant quit instead so full respect ..
 

Naughty_Felid

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Suddenly giving up any dangerous drug habit is never a good idea without medical professional supervision .. I'm a smoker who's slowed down by using rolling tobacco, cigarette papers and filter tips instead .. you'll probably find that if you do the same thing, you'll smoke less frequently because it requires time and effort to make the things and that's something we haven't got a lot of time to do at the moment .. so it's a 'the glass is half full' temporary solution only .. the added bonus of rolling your own is that there's less other weird chemicals you're inhaling and it's a LOT cheaper .. and every cigarette you'll smoke is going to be less than half the size of manufactured cigarettes .. then finally quitting for good would become easier for people .. so you've done it hardcore instant quit instead so full respect ..
Micheal59 hasn't smoked for 6 months Swifty so I doubt there will be any major physiological issues. It's not like suddenly giving up alcohol when you've drunk two bottles of vodka a day and risk having a seizure.

There is obviously a neurological remanent and the brain hasn't yet re-wired itself. It will.

She has managed 6 months which is a fantastic achievement and shows great strength. Micheal59 is in menopause also - I don't know many who'd have managed the last 6 months with quitting smoking too. Also the health stuff as well - we are looking at some serious personal strength here.

I was really interested in her experience and how she was tackling her cravings. Hence I asked some questions and look forward to reading more.

As an ex-smoker of approx 15 years now, I can tell you your method doesn't work. Rolling tobacco isn't better for you, cutting down doesn't work, as you are still feeding those receptors as well as damaging your lungs. It's really bad advice - really bad.

"Deborah Arnott, chief executive of the anti-smoking charity ASH, said that tobacco used for roll-ups contained just as many harmful chemicals of a manufactured cigarette.

“They’re not any more healthy, and you’re not going to die any less quickly if you smoke hand-rolled tobacco,” she said. “A useful analogy that has been used is that arguing over the difference between roll-ups and straights is like arguing whether it’s safer to jump out of the 20th or 15th floor of a building – either way you’re going to hit the ground and die.”


https://www.independent.co.uk/life-...s-as-any-other-type-of-cigarette-9122464.html

What we need to be doing is supporting Micheal59, giving her major pats on the back for pretty much nailing it and looking forward to when she finally crosses the finish line, when those cravings finally go away.
 
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Naughty_Felid

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Hi Naughty_Felid, thanks for responding. I am answering both your posts in this one below. :) It's a bit whiny and you'll probably wish you hadn't asked. lol

Well, I suppose it was for 3 reasons mainly, there are others but the main ones being that I am of poor health, only have half a working heart and the coughing was putting me at risk for my 14th heart attack. Secondly, I was paying more monthly for my addiction than I am paying for rent. The price for cigarettes is obscene. And 3, it is the only thing that I have never been able to drop as a habit in my lifetime so I was determined with the price being so high that I give it up. I have tried so many times already and never made it past 6 weeks.

I made myself a promise that I will never smoke another cigarette in my life. I intend to honor that promise but, man, it has been so tough. Way tougher than I ever expected and with my health, I cannot afford to gain weight because getting overheated can also give me another heart attack, which means I am not allowed to exercise. I am also in menopause and that give me hot flashes. Lucky, hot flashes don't last long enough to put me in danger of another attack but, it completely drains my energy when I am over heated. I also have a back problem along with hip ailments.

In other words I am old and falling apart. :rolleyes:
That statement is epic.

You are very tough yourself. Health problems. quitting smoking with strong cravings, menopause - bloody hell 6 months is impressive and we've got all this fear and stress with the virus.

Also, I don't see any of this "it's a bit whiny" at all. Quite the opposite.
 
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michael59

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So essentially smoking again isn't an option.

So how do you usually get through the cravings? You've done 6 Months which is phenomenal. How have you managed that?
Well...

- I manage it by eating, mostly. I told myself that every time I start having a nic fit, I would get up and do some house work instead of eating. That lasted about 4 days. lol

- I gave up coffee because drinking it really made me crave. It is what I did everyday. Get up do my bathroom routine, make coffee, then sit and smoke while I drank it and answered my emails.

- I'm down to three fingernails. The others are pretty much just bloodied stumps.

- I take a lot of really deep breaths.

- Marijuana is legal here in Canada. When it gets to the point that the cravings are too much, I put a pinch of marijuana in a pipe and smoke it. It really makes me cough. because my lungs are healing so, they are kind of raw. In turn, the coughing makes me feel like I don't need a smoke.

So, those are the things I've been doing thus far.

I smoked for 54 years and every time I made the attempt to quit, I would self sabotage I am an expert at self sabotage. I'm also an expert at procrastinating. You know what I noticed? I used smoking as a excuse to procrastinate. Whenever I had to do something, anything, I would say to myself, "Ah, one more smoke and then I'll get started."

Whenever I start to feel myself pondering buying a pack, I just sternly say to myself, I can never smoke another cigarette as long as I live.

I'm going to give myself 6 more months without putting any limits on self medicating with food and then I will have to work on losing weight.

Also, this sentence has given me something to work with:

There is obviously a neurological remanent and the brain hasn't yet re-wired itself. It will.
That had not occurred to me and I think if I make a conscious effort, I can work with that because like I said, self sabotage is a terrible habit of mine.

I'm not putting myself through all this again. Enough is enough, I quit.

Naughtyfelid, I never expected such a kind and thoughtful response from anyone. Thank you so much it means a lot to me. :)

@Swifty, I have no self control. If I have smokes, I smoke them. When I ran short of money and tobacco, I started re-rolling tobacco from the butts. I did try rolling my own and now I can roll a whole pack in under 15 minutes. I wish I was that disciplined in other aspects of my life. lol It was a good suggestion though and I thank you for taking the time to respond. :)

@escargot, it's nice of you to say so but, if you're as old as you feel, I'm in my early 90's. lol ;)

@Analogue Boy, I did consider vaping. The guy who works at the corner store from me did that. He said that he still gets his nicotine fix but, at least now he can breath so much easier. I know if I start vaping, it will only be a matter of time before I'm paying a small fortune on that too. I seriously have no self discipline when it comes to smoking. I do thank you for the suggestion. :)
 

Analogue Boy

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Granted the fluid costs money. BUT so do fags. I went onto rollies but that's still a harsh nicotine delivery system.
Over the years, I had developed a nasty smoker's cough and after 2 weeks vaping it totally disappeared.
As I say, it's been just over a year and I haven't needed a lit cigarette with all the lovely cocktail of chemicals added to it.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Granted the fluid costs money. BUT so do fags. I went onto rollies but that's still a harsh nicotine delivery system.
Over the years, I had developed a nasty smoker's cough and after 2 weeks vaping it totally disappeared.
As I say, it's been just over a year and I haven't needed a lit cigarette with all the lovely cocktail of chemicals added to it.
I really think Micheal59 is pretty much done it. I don't think vaping is the answer it's better than smoking but still not completely safe.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/hea...ention/5-truths-you-need-to-know-about-vaping

You are still super-heating a substance and drawing it into your lungs.
 
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Naughty_Felid

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I smoked for 54 years and every time I made the attempt to quit, I would self sabotage I am an expert at self sabotage. I'm also an expert at procrastinating. You know what I noticed? I used smoking as a excuse to procrastinate. Whenever I had to do something, anything, I would say to myself, "Ah, one more smoke and then I'll get started."
54 years is a long time to expose the brain to a substance. I think your goal of another 6 months is great. I'm pretty confident that if you carry on you'll start seeing a reduction in cravings soon.

I love how you say to Swifty "I have no self-control..." :D yet six months in you still haven't smoked.

I reckon deal with the nicotine and then look at the weight. Check-in with your GP he/she will be able to offer more help.

btw:
  • 20 minutes after quitting, your heart rate drops. Cigarettes raise your blood pressure and increase your heart rate. You heart rate will begin to drop to normal levels within 20 minutes of your last cigarette.
  • 8 to 12 hours after quitting, you blood carbon monoxide level drops. Carbon monoxide is the same dangerous fume that comes from car exhaust. It causes your heart rate to increase and causes shortness of breath. Within 8 to 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops, and your blood oxygen increases.
  • 48 hours after quitting, your ability to smell and taste improves. The nerve endings damaged by smoking begin to regrow, improving your sense of smell and taste.
  • 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting, your risk of heart attack drops. Improved circulation, lower blood pressure and heart rate, and better oxygen levels and lung function all reduce your risk of a heart attack.
  • 1 to 9 months after quitting, you’ll feel less short of breath and cough less. Coughing, shortness of breath, and sinus congestion will decrease. You’ll feel more energetic overall.
  • 1 year after quitting, your risk of heart disease will be cut in half. Smoking significantly increases your risk of heart disease.
  • 5 years after quitting, your risk of stroke decreases. Depending on how much and how long you smoked and your overall health, your risk of stroke will be the same as someone who’s never smoked within 5 to 15 years of quitting.
    10 years after quitting, your risk of lung cancer drops to that of someone who’s never smoked. Your risk of dying from lung cancer will be that of a person who’s never smoked. Your risk of developing other cancers decreases significantly.
    15 years after quitting, you risk of heart disease is the same as someone who’s never smoked. After you quit, you’ll have lower cholesterol, thinner blood (which reduces your risk of blood clots), and lower blood pressure.
 

Krepostnoi

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This is true. TRUTH. It will come @michael59
I'll echo this: I quit in 2001, after a 20+ a day habit. I relapsed in 2002 during the final assessment period for my MA, but then quit again. My last cigarette was in 2007, when I was drunk and euphoric after seeing Leonard Cohen live, but that was the first in years. I did have cravings for a long time, but now I shudder at the thought. I don't get drunk very often these days, but even when I do, and when my associates are lighting up, I'm not in the least interested. It does get easier, I promise. And you're already doing brilliantly, and you've already got through the worst.
 

Shady

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@michael59 That is amazing in itself, 6 months, took some real restraint on your part, keep it up, good luck on your next 6 months, you can do it, at the end of it treat yourself, maybe a nice cake or something you love. Best of luck :group:
 

michael59

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I'll echo this: I quit in 2001, after a 20+ a day habit. I relapsed in 2002 during the final assessment period for my MA, but then quit again. My last cigarette was in 2007, when I was drunk and euphoric after seeing Leonard Cohen live, but that was the first in years. I did have cravings for a long time, but now I shudder at the thought. I don't get drunk very often these days, but even when I do, and when my associates are lighting up, I'm not in the least interested. It does get easier, I promise. And you're already doing brilliantly, and you've already got through the worst.
I used to smoke double the amount when I drank any kind of alcohol. So far so good, I haven't cheated once since I quit. I don't know why it took this time. Seriously, I must have quit a thousand times and never made it past 6 weeks. lol

I wish I had seen Leonard Cohen before it was too late. He is one of my favorite artists.

Congratulations on quitting, Krepostnoi and thank you. :)
 

michael59

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54 years is a long time to expose the brain to a substance. I think your goal of another 6 months is great. I'm pretty confident that if you carry on you'll start seeing a reduction in cravings soon.

I love how you say to Swifty "I have no self-control..." :D yet six months in you still haven't smoked.

I reckon deal with the nicotine and then look at the weight. Check-in with your GP he/she will be able to offer more help.

btw:
  • 20 minutes after quitting, your heart rate drops. Cigarettes raise your blood pressure and increase your heart rate. You heart rate will begin to drop to normal levels within 20 minutes of your last cigarette.
  • 8 to 12 hours after quitting, you blood carbon monoxide level drops. Carbon monoxide is the same dangerous fume that comes from car exhaust. It causes your heart rate to increase and causes shortness of breath. Within 8 to 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops, and your blood oxygen increases.
  • 48 hours after quitting, your ability to smell and taste improves. The nerve endings damaged by smoking begin to regrow, improving your sense of smell and taste.
  • 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting, your risk of heart attack drops. Improved circulation, lower blood pressure and heart rate, and better oxygen levels and lung function all reduce your risk of a heart attack.
  • 1 to 9 months after quitting, you’ll feel less short of breath and cough less. Coughing, shortness of breath, and sinus congestion will decrease. You’ll feel more energetic overall.
  • 1 year after quitting, your risk of heart disease will be cut in half. Smoking significantly increases your risk of heart disease.
  • 5 years after quitting, your risk of stroke decreases. Depending on how much and how long you smoked and your overall health, your risk of stroke will be the same as someone who’s never smoked within 5 to 15 years of quitting.
    10 years after quitting, your risk of lung cancer drops to that of someone who’s never smoked. Your risk of dying from lung cancer will be that of a person who’s never smoked. Your risk of developing other cancers decreases significantly.
    15 years after quitting, you risk of heart disease is the same as someone who’s never smoked. After you quit, you’ll have lower cholesterol, thinner blood (which reduces your risk of blood clots), and lower blood pressure.
I feel more confident just having shared this issue with you. I still woke up this morning wanting to smoke but, it past before I even realized it. 54 years is a long time. I remember talking to the surgeon before he cut off my nose. He wanted me to stop for at least 3 days before surgery. I said if I could stop for 3 days, I would have quit a long time ago.

It was like breathing to me, I don't ever remember not smoking. It was so acceptable in my day. I told the surgeon that the doctor who delivered me was probably squat down with his hands stretched out to grab me and a smoke hanging out of his mouth. :D
 

michael59

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@michael59 That is amazing in itself, 6 months, took some real restraint on your part, keep it up, good luck on your next 6 months, you can do it, at the end of it treat yourself, maybe a nice cake or something you love. Best of luck :group:
Thank you, Shady. :bpals:

I just got really angry when I saw the price rise to over $17 a pack. I remember my mom hunting through the couch and chair for change and when she found enough, she sent me to the store to get a pack of Export A for 37 cents.

Mmmmm...cake. :D
 

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Granted the fluid costs money. BUT so do fags. I went onto rollies but that's still a harsh nicotine delivery system.
Over the years, I had developed a nasty smoker's cough and after 2 weeks vaping it totally disappeared.
As I say, it's been just over a year and I haven't needed a lit cigarette with all the lovely cocktail of chemicals added to it.
I'm actually thinking about making my next Cannabis purchase in vaping form, any suggestions on what is the best kind of apparatus to purchase? It won't be for a while though because I don't smoke it that often. :)
 
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