The Yeti

Dunbaraj

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Has anyone watched the Polish Yeti video yet? Apologies if already mentioned, this thread got deep.

 

GNC

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Was that the viral ad or was that... Spanish maybe? Or is this along the same lines for a different product?
 

Mythopoeika

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I've tracked the yeti in the Garo Hills of North India. I saw it's tracks and spoke to many hill tribe members who all described a ten foot tall, bipedal, black haired, gorilla-like creature. The mountain jungle here stretches on through Assam and into Bhutan. The yeti is seen throughout this range.
Do you have photos of the tracks? That'd be interesting.
 

AnonyJoolz

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Having spent some time in the Himalayas I would have to say that "deep, uninhabited, forested valleys" are pretty thin on the ground up there. Like every other spot on the globe, if there is a half-way decent patch of land anywhere there'll be people in there trying to make it work for them (and b*ggering it up in the process). It's just not true that there's huge areas of the Himalayas that no-one ever goes into. And the areas where the most persistent yeti stories are to be found, such as the Khumbu and the valleys up Gokyo way, are quite densly populated by Himalayan standards.

It's also true that many, if not most, of the younger Sherpas consider the yeti to be just a superstition promulgated by the old folk.

However, it is true that the Himalayas are home to many rare, elusive and strange creatures. I myself have seen snow leopard tracks in fresh snow above 4,500 metres. It had crossed our path no more than an hour or so earlier, yet the whole valley was as quiet and still as a tomb. I still haven't seen a snow leopard in the wild, yet I believe they exist. But I'm not so sure about the yeti, at least as it is most often portrayed.

Yep. My husband is from the lower Himalayan 'foothills' (still higher than Britain's highest peaks!) and he used to be a trek guide along the Annapurna peaks. He reports that the Yeti has always been regarded as a mythical-spiritual man-animal, not as a 'real' species, at least amongst the Sherpa & Kirati people he met and worked with. Something like a Banshee or Werewolf for example.

Some remote areas are havens for rare and endangered wildlife - bears, snow leopards, vultures.

What is totally false is the assumption that 'proud' 'noble' and 'natural' Nepali / Tibetan mountain people are somehow different from westerners. They are just as canny or gullible (or not) and atuned to nature (or not) as anyone else! I get fed up with the exotic east trope...
 

oldrover

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Yep. My husband is from the lower Himalayan 'foothills' (still higher than Britain's highest peaks!) and he used to be a trek guide along the Annapurna peaks. He reports that the Yeti has always been regarded as a mythical-spiritual man-animal, not as a 'real' species, at least amongst the Sherpa & Kirati people he met and worked with. Something like a Banshee or Werewolf for example.

Some remote areas are havens for rare and endangered wildlife - bears, snow leopards, vultures.

What is totally false is the assumption that 'proud' 'noble' and 'natural' Nepali / Tibetan mountain people are somehow different from westerners. They are just as canny or gullible (or not) and atuned to nature (or not) as anyone else! I get fed up with the exotic east trope...
Very interesting post, thank you.
 

lordmongrove

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Yep. My husband is from the lower Himalayan 'foothills' (still higher than Britain's highest peaks!) and he used to be a trek guide along the Annapurna peaks. He reports that the Yeti has always been regarded as a mythical-spiritual man-animal, not as a 'real' species, at least amongst the Sherpa & Kirati people he met and worked with. Something like a Banshee or Werewolf for example.

Some remote areas are havens for rare and endangered wildlife - bears, snow leopards, vultures.

What is totally false is the assumption that 'proud' 'noble' and 'natural' Nepali / Tibetan mountain people are somehow different from westerners. They are just as canny or gullible (or not) and atuned to nature (or not) as anyone else! I get fed up with the exotic east trope...
The Hill Tribes in the Garo Hills know and fear the yeti as a real ape not some bogey man. Peter Byrne spent years living like a nomad in the Himalayas and found that the locals knew of the yeti as a flesh and blood animal.
 

lordmongrove

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This was the best of a series we tracked by a jungle stream in the Garo Hills. They were filled with rain water and could not be casted. The print was 12 inches by five and sunk over one and a half inches into the ground. My own fat bastard prints sunk only half an inch in. It showed five toes and seemed to be several days old. We followed the trail, along a stream were the animal seemed to have turned over large heavy rocks and eaten freshwater crabs. Other witnesses reported it eating crabs (the only meat food witnesses saw taken.)
 

lordmongrove

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Forgive me if I'm being thick, but is the heel very narrow?
It looks like that at first but is due to the fact that the print overlay another small depression in the mud that is also filled with water. The arrow like bit at the back is not part of the print.
 

oldrover

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It looks like that at first but is due to the fact that the print overlay another small depression in the mud that is also filled with water. The arrow like bit at the back is not part of the print.
So, are the prints overlaying each other side by side, for want of a better way to put it? With the heels together?

By the way, have you seen the farce in Australia?
 

lordmongrove

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So, are the prints overlaying each other side by side, for want of a better way to put it? With the heels together?

By the way, have you seen the farce in Australia?
The possible yeti print is overlaid, at the back of the heel, with another depression that seemed unconnected.
What farce is going on in Australia?
 

Vardoger

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I came across the "yeti photo" taken by those teenagers who got killed in the Dyatlov Pass in Siberia.
I did some work on it and tried to enhance it, removing noise and add a little sharpness.

Here's the original.
Urals yeti.png


After the work was done some more details appear.
urals - yeti enhanced.jpeg


Looks like it wears pants and it got no hair on the upper body that we can see at least.
Unfortunately it was impossible to sharpen the face.
 
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I came across the "yeti photo" taken by those teenagers who got killed in the Dyatlov Pass in Siberia.
I did some work on it and tried to enhance it, removing noise and add a little sharpness.


Looks like it wears pants and it got no hair on the upper body that we can see at least.

Unfortunately it was impossible to sharpen the face.
Its Putin!
 
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