Things Found Inside Second-Hand Books (Inscriptions; Papers; Etc.)

Kryptonite

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I'm sure I'm not the only person here who loves finding used books. I always feel that they bring a sense of history, of previous owners and years spent lying on shelves waiting for a new owner to discover them.

I am always fascinated to find second-hand bookshops' names stamped inside them (interesting and sometimes a little saddening to check them out on Google Maps and see if they've survived), and also the weird stuff people have used as bookmarks, and thought I'd share some of these- no idea if anyone other than me will find this interesting, but hopefully someone gets something from it.

A couple of pics to start off, more to follow...

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escargot

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When I used the town library a lot there must have one or two of my improvised bookmarks left in - scraps of newspaper, bus tickets, leaves etc.

I once took a book back in which I'd accidentally left a working model I'd made of a certain soap actress performing the sex act for which she had inadvertently become famous.
For some reason the librarian riffled through the book, found it and handed it back. Deadpan. I couldn't deny it was mine, she'd only been in the tabloids about it a day or two before.
 

Kryptonite

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I found a book (in a shop) that had been autographed by Ray Bradbury. I assume it was, unless it was someone pretending.
As a teen, I collected the Target Doctor Who novels. I bought a used copy of the Abominable Snowmen and found Tom Baker's autograph inside!
 

Kryptonite

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Found in a 1960s paperback book of EC horror comics reprints. Name and address removed for the privacy of the pet owner.

Delighted to see on Google Maps that the St.Angelus Pet Hospital is still at the address on the receipt, 54 years later!
 

Ringo

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I must be in a soppy mood because the idea of finding instructions, clues, notes and secret messages in old books has filled me with glee, delight and a whimsical sense of "I need to have an adventure".

I once found a book which had certain individual letters underlined on the first page of text. I (rather fantastically) imagined that it was a code cipher for some cold war spy. The letters didn't spell anything though.
 

ramonmercado

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I found a book (in a shop) that had been autographed by Ray Bradbury. I assume it was, unless it was someone pretending.
My father found a book of short stories signed Leon Trotsky 1936 and was excited; it seemed plausible, the book was a collection of short stories by James T. Farrell (who had been a Trotskyist). Sadly when he turned to the copoyright page it turned out that the book had been printed in the 1940s after Trotsky's death.
 

Kryptonite

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maximus otter

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My father found a book of short stories signed Leon Trotsky 1936 and was excited; it seemed plausible, the book was a collection of short stories by James T. Farrell (who had been a Trotskyist). Sadly when he turned to the copoyright page it turned out that the book had been printed in the 1940s after Trotsky's death.
Not n(ice pick)ings, then.

maximus otter
 

hunck

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When I used the town library a lot there must have one or two of my improvised bookmarks left in - scraps of newspaper, bus tickets, leaves etc.

I once took a book back in which I'd accidentally left a working model I'd made of a certain soap actress performing the sex act for which she had inadvertently become famous.
For some reason the librarian riffled through the book, found it and handed it back. Deadpan. I couldn't deny it was mine, she'd only been in the tabloids about it a day or two before.
I know who you mean - it took place in a car, yes?

I'm interested in this 'working model' - was it constructed from a photo of said celebrity or more of an artful origami contraption? And was an artists impression of a todger involved? Just trying to picture the scenario.
 

escargot

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I know who you mean - it took place in a car, yes?

I'm interested in this 'working model' - was it constructed from a photo of said celebrity or more of an artful origami contraption? And was an artists impression of a todger involved? Just trying to picture the scenario.
Yup, there was indeed a photo of her holding the todger. The clever bit was that you couldn't see the todger until you pulled the tab at the side which moved the todger up and into Ms X's mouth. Then you could move another that made her head move up and down. All rather adolescent.

It was something I did a lot; often used to make little cut-out toys and moving paper and card models for my kids. and show them how to do it themselves. The Cat and the Fiddle, Humpty Dumpty etc, doing what they do.
Not todgers, of course.
 

hunck

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Yup, there was indeed a photo of her holding the todger. The clever bit was that you couldn't see the todger until you pulled the tab at the side which moved the todger up and into Ms X's mouth. Then you could move another that made her head move up and down. All rather adolescent.

It was something I did a lot; often used to make little cut-out toys and moving paper and card models for my kids. and show them how to do it themselves. The Cat and the Fiddle, Humpty Dumpty etc, doing what they do.
Not todgers, of course.
I'm sure she'd appreciate your effort to commemorate the occasion.
 
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