Things That Make You Go... WTF?

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Perhaps this political story is acceptable here. Was someone fleeced or just a case of ramming their opinions down your throat? What do ewe think? The farmers are also revolting. Vid at link.

A sitting of Lesotho's upper house of parliament this week degenerated into a fist-fight between massed ranks of rival MPs who also threw wooden panels, documents and anything else they could get their hands on across the chamber at each other.

The scuffle happened during a debate over a long-running dispute over new regulations around the wool and mohair trade - not the subject you might expect to ignite such strong passions. Earlier this year, thousands of farmers marched to parliament to protest against a regulation signed in 2018 forcing them to sell their wool and mohair to a Chinese broker. The farmers said that the new broker was not paying them for their goods. This led to a crisis that left an estimated 48,000 farmers without earnings for more than a year, according to South Africa's BusinessLive newspaper.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-50598882
 

Shady

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Watch CNN some evening and you will find out.
*slaps him up side of head* For the love of god tell us, i dont watch the news and i aint sitting thro it
I am Bi and I'm certainly Queer in both senses.
I would like to ask a question, Does the word not offend you at all, as to me i thought queer would be offensive.
 

Shady

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Thank you, i still would not feel right in calling someone that tho, altho i would still use it in other contexts.
 

GNC

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"Queer cinema" is a term for a film genre that most people don't have a problem with. Other than people who would have a problem with it whatever it was called. I've also heard/seen films with the "queer sensibility", which sounds a bit Jane Austen.
 

maximus otter

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blessmycottonsocks

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Thank you, i still would not feel right in calling someone that tho, altho i would still use it in other contexts.
Arthur Atkinson (aka Paul Whitehouse) worked ceaselessly to reinstate the meaning of queer as peculiar.
Trouble is, I can't even think of saying "how queer!" now without adding "where's me washboard".

 

Lord Lucan

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Arthur Atkinson (aka Paul Whitehouse) worked ceaselessly to reinstate the meaning of queer as peculiar.
Trouble is, I can't even think of saying "how queer!" now without adding "where's me washboard".

The word 'queer' always makes me think of Quentin Crisp. A number of my male gay friends refer to themselves as 'Queens' though I never would. If I ever (rarely) need to define any of my friends sexuality, I simply refer to them as gay or lesbian.
 
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The word 'queer' always makes me think of Quentin Crisp. A number of my male gay friends refer to themselves as 'Queens' though I never would. If I ever (rarely) need to define any of friends sexuality, I simply refer to them as gay or lesbian.
Princesses, Queens and Dowager Duchesses would describe the life cycle of some gay males.
 

sherbetbizarre

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Anthony Burgess on an old Cockney phrase...
...he reveals how he came up with the title for A Clockwork Orange: he first heard the phrase, he writes, in 1945, when he heard “an 80-year-old Cockney in a London pub say that somebody was ‘as queer as a clockwork orange’”.

“The ‘queer’ did not mean homosexual: it meant mad. The phrase intrigued me with its unlikely fusion of demotic and surrealistic,” writes Burgess. “For nearly 20 years, I wanted to use it as the title of something. During those 20 years I heard it several times more – in Underground stations, in pubs, in television plays – but always from aged Cockneys, never from the young. It was a traditional trope and it asked to entitle a work which combined a concern with tradition and a bizarre technique. The opportunity to use it came when I conceived the notion of writing a novel about brainwashing.”
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2...-lost-sequel-to-a-clockwork-orange-discovered
 

EnolaGaia

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There's an old American English idiom that plays on yet another meaning for "queer" - i.e., "fake", "phony" or "counterfeit":

"Queer as a three-dollar bill."

The phrase ostensibly dates back at least as far as the late 19th century, and the use of "queer" to mean "fake" allegedly dates back to circa 1740.

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/queer+as+a+three-dollar+bill
 

EnolaGaia

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Just for the record ...
queer (adj.)
c. 1500, "strange, peculiar, eccentric," from Scottish, perhaps from Low German (Brunswick dialect) queer "oblique, off-center," related to German quer "oblique, perverse, odd," from Old High German twerh "oblique," from PIE root *terkw- "to twist."

Sense of "homosexual" first recorded 1922; the noun in this sense is 1935, from the adjective.
https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=queer
 

Gloucestrian

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There's an old American English idiom that plays on yet another meaning for "queer" - i.e., "fake", "phony" or "counterfeit":

"Queer as a three-dollar bill."

The phrase ostensibly dates back at least as far as the late 19th century, and the use of "queer" to mean "fake" allegedly dates back to circa 1740.

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/queer+as+a+three-dollar+bill
There was a very similar idiom in England "queer as a nine-bob note" with the same connotations of untrustworthy or counterfeit as there was no such note as a 9 shilling note. I wonder which was the original or perhaps there was an older idiom that both derive from.
 

escargot

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There was a very similar idiom in England "queer as a nine-bob note" with the same connotations of untrustworthy or counterfeit as there was no such note as a 9 shilling note. I wonder which was the original or perhaps there was an older idiom that both derive from.
There was also 'bent as a nine-bob note' which implied either homosexuality or more often corruption, specifically of the police. I still hear it now and then, long after decimalisation! Perhaps because of the slight alliteration of 'bent' and 'bob'.
 

Yithian

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There was also 'bent as a nine-bob note' which implied either homosexuality or more often corruption, specifically of the police. I still hear it now and then, long after decimalisation! Perhaps because of the slight alliteration of 'bent' and 'bob'.
The two I'm familiar with (family: ex-Londoners) are bent as three-bob bit and bent as a nine-bob note.

My father still uses the the former, though--similar to what Escargot says--to mean suspect, fake, unlikely to be genuine.

'A bob' being a shilling (1/–), 'a bit' being a coin, a 'two-bob bit' (2/–) being a florin and a three-bob bit not existing--hence of highly dubious authenticity.

A ten-shilling note did exist, but not a 'nine-bob note'--hence, again, it's suspect; although I don't like this one as much, because it loses the sense of somebody trying to pass off something as more valuable than it could possibly be. A nine-shilling note, had it existed, would have been worth less than a standard ten-shilling note.

They're all catchy as they seem almost like reduplicative ablauts.

I did make an effort to learn all the pre-decimalisation currency, but it really takes an effort to think naturally in them.
 
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