Things That Make You Go... WTF?

Swifty

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My first flat (clearly not in London) cost me just over £30,000 – and the company selling it paid my 5% deposit (they'd bought a block of three Georgian buildings in Bath to convert into flats, and desperately needed to sell). Talk about different times. And this flat had a kitchen and a bathroom and a living room (bike rollers behind the settee!) and a double bedroom.

How the flip has our country's economy got to this position? Maybe somebody could build an apartment on it now that we seem to be abandoning anything resembling building regs altogether, and this from a position where 3.6x3.6m (12x12ft) apartments are already allowed. Madness. Two-storey caravan perhaps?

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/aug/25/flats-block-converting-offices-living-space
Reminds me of the high rise capsules in Spielberg's Ready Player One
 

Stormkhan

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How the flip has our country's economy got to this position?
Easy. Who tells us how much a home is worth?
The builders build, starting with cost price then adding "how much would someone pay in that area, for those facilities?"
The Estate Agent says "how much would someone pay [builders asking price + how much would someone pay for those facilities]? Plus, of course, our own commission?"
The prospective purchaser says "Who do we ask how much that home is worth, considering the area and facilities? I know - let's ask Estate Agents. Who just happen to earn commission on the sale."
Why do we want to purchase property, at any cost? Well, a mortgage (a debt) is available from banks and building societies who earn a nice fee. Solicitors earn a nice fee. Estate Agents earn a nice fee. And when you are saddled with debt ... er, sorry ... a mortgage, you become vulnerable to employers. All the time it's more expensive to rent than to pay a mortgage (if you can actually get one), all the time you are told you are not 'successful' unless you can yarn to your neighbours how much your property is 'worth', all the time you are told how much a property is worth, then those who benefit - builders, banks, Estate Agents etc. can name their own fees. And all these hard-working and upright industries tend to favour capitalism.
Once upon a time, the phrase "bricks 'n' mortar" was used to symbolise a good investment. This was, of course, when people owned their property outright - either to live in or to rent out. But the advent or rather the improved image of debt/mortgage encouraged "investment" in property not the value of owned property to owners. Until they died, my parents owned their homes. Can't afford it? Don't move. You own it? You live there. When property prices increased to a point where you had to get in debt to own, the "bricks 'n' mortar" wisdom failed and became more aspirational.
Now we are in a situation where foreign investors buy (and sell) expensive property, not for use, or even to rent out, but to *ah* invest monies into an economy, otherwise known in not-high-finance circles as money laundering, so the actual cost - on the ground, as it were - of having the necessity of a home is both overpriced and artificial.
The bubble of property investment is close to bursting ... if people suddenly realise the actual artifice of it all.
 

Ladyloafer

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My first flat (clearly not in London) cost me just over £30,000 – and the company selling it paid my 5% deposit (they'd bought a block of three Georgian buildings in Bath to convert into flats, and desperately needed to sell). Talk about different times. And this flat had a kitchen and a bathroom and a living room (bike rollers behind the settee!) and a double bedroom.

How the flip has our country's economy got to this position? Maybe somebody could build an apartment on it now that we seem to be abandoning anything resembling building regs altogether, and this from a position where 3.6x3.6m (12x12ft) apartments are already allowed. Madness. Two-storey caravan perhaps?

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2018/aug/25/flats-block-converting-offices-living-space
Too many buy to let investment twats. Just dont get me started :mad:
There are good reasons to let a home and there are people who would prefer to rent but a home should not be a money making investment.
 

Peripart

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Did you mean that who ever was driving that black 4x4, learned the getaway technique from off of and old video game?
Not any specific game, no. I just meant that the car's movements had an unrealistic look, reminding me of any number of old video games (I guess Carmageddon might be a good example, come to think of it).
 

Recycled1

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I'd be interested to know how today's property prices compare with those in the past.

I got married in 1967, and we moved into our first Wimpy semi outside Stockport ,in 1968.
It cost £3,750 , if I remember correctly -10% deposit provided by money left to me by my great uncle.

My (then) husband was a newly qualified graduate secondary school teacher. I was at home -not working -with our new baby.

Life was a real financial struggle - my husband worked in a pub in the evening to help. I had to watch every penny -but we both smoked, and accepted the fact!

I'm now in a tiny 'starter' two bedroomed terraced house in Dorset, worth at least £200 thousand!
 

Ladyloafer

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There will always be people who need to rent a place, for whatever reason.
Yes. And whether through social housing authorities or private landlords, we should be able to rent knowing we have reasonable security of tenure with a landlord or manager who is willing and able to fix problems and won't consider putting up mere picture hooks as damage yet haven't actually decorated the place to any kind of homely standard for years and who have themselves either never been a renter or not for decades and have no consideration that their 'investment', acquired for the sole purpose of increasing in sale value my be their property but is their tennents home.



And breathe.
 

Zeke Newbold

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I really, really hope that there is more to this story than meets the eye and/or that I am missing something. If not, then this ought, by rights, to be the number one outrage in the UK right now:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...detained-nhs-hull-mental-health-a9653876.html

I'll reserve judgement and further comment until I get some clarification from some of the more knowledgeable members of this board.

Until then, the initials W.T. F can scarcely do justice to my gut feelings about this story.
 
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Stormkhan

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I'm now in a tiny 'starter' two bedroomed terraced house in Dorset, worth at least £200 thousand!
It's only 'worth' that if you intend to sell. Insurance companies are part of the problem. In more high falutin' circles, the question is "what makes a diamond valuable?"
 

Stillill

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I'd be interested to know how today's property prices compare with those in the past.

I got married in 1967, and we moved into our first Wimpy semi outside Stockport ,in 1968.
It cost £3,750 , if I remember correctly -10% deposit provided by money left to me by my great uncle.

My (then) husband was a newly qualified graduate secondary school teacher. I was at home -not working -with our new baby.

Life was a real financial struggle - my husband worked in a pub in the evening to help. I had to watch every penny -but we both smoked, and accepted the fact!

I'm now in a tiny 'starter' two bedroomed terraced house in Dorset, worth at least £200 thousand!
A quick example of how ridiculous house prices have become. My Mum and dad bought their present house in Northwood, Middlesex in 1970 for just under £7000. He was a painter and decorator and my mum was looking after me and my two sisters so there was only one income.
Now these houses sell for around 700k so if you want one you need to be on a very healthy income. It’s gone from a painter and decorator being able to afford it to only a small percentage of the population being able afford it. Northwood has become impossible for first time buyers and so have a lot of areas in the country.
 

Mythopoeika

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A quick example of how ridiculous house prices have become. My Mum and dad bought their present house in Northwood, Middlesex in 1970 for just under £7000. He was a painter and decorator and my mum was looking after me and my two sisters so there was only one income.
Now these houses sell for around 700k so if you want one you need to be on a very healthy income. It’s gone from a painter and decorator being able to afford it to only a small percentage of the population being able afford it. Northwood has become impossible for first time buyers and so have a lot of areas in the country.
Yes, it's madness. My Mum and Dad bought their small bungalow for £2500 in the late 50s. It's now worth in the region of £400k.
My Mum's friend told me I should move back to my home town to take care of my Mum. I tried to point out that I'd have to become a millionaire before I could do that.
 

Lord Lucan

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It's mandatory for people here in Victoria to wear masks too.
The daughter who works in a supermarket keeps getting disgruntled customers asking where their free masks are,
She politely tells them that everyone has to buy their own and the price of a pack which doesn't please them at all.
I'm in NSW and whilst thing here are not as bad as in Victoria, it soon will be if people don't start doing the right thing.
I own a store and as of tomorrow, our staff will be all wearing masks ( we have had them available to those who want to wear them ). Sanitiser is available at the entrance and we ask everyone to use it upon entering, though sometimes we're met with the reply, ' Oh, but I just used some next door.' Maybe, but I didn't see you do it and I'm not going to just take your word for it, so again I'll politely explain it's not only for their health, but also for every other customer's who walks in as well as my staff's, my family's and myself.
We have 1000s of items of stock and can't clean reach one after each customer touches something.
Is being sanitary and considerate too much to ask? For some, it seems the answer is yes.
 
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Iris

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I've said to my daughter that the way some customers are behaving is because they are afraid of what's happening and it's making those with mental problems worse.
There's a perspex screen between them and the cashiers wear masks and still they either complain to the supervisor they think the mask should be up to the eyes or email the store complaining.
At least the girls can get together at breaks and talk about them.
I wonder why the habitual complainers don't just buy online.
On the other hand one lady my daughter had complimented about her nice mask brought in a couple for her that she'd made.
 

Lord Lucan

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I've said to my daughter that the way some customers are behaving is because they are afraid of what's happening and it's making those with mental problems worse.
There's a perspex screen between them and the cashiers wear masks and still they either complain to the supervisor they think the mask should be up to the eyes or email the store complaining.
At least the girls can get together at breaks and talk about them.
I wonder why the habitual complainers don't just buy online.
On the other hand one lady my daughter had complimented about her nice mask brought in a couple for her that she'd made.
I wish your daughter well. The general public can be dickheads at the best of times let alone when in difficult times like now. Our eldest son is a doctor at one of Melbourne's largest hospitals. He works in accident & emergency so is dealing with much the same thing whilst trying trying to deal with genuinely ill & injured patients.
 
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Iris

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You must be worried about him at the moment, being on the front line. Hope everything goes well with him.
 

Min Bannister

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I've said to my daughter that the way some customers are behaving is because they are afraid of what's happening and it's making those with mental problems worse.
There's a perspex screen between them and the cashiers wear masks and still they either complain to the supervisor they think the mask should be up to the eyes or email the store complaining.
At least the girls can get together at breaks and talk about them.
I wonder why the habitual complainers don't just buy online.
On the other hand one lady my daughter had complimented about her nice mask brought in a couple for her that she'd made.
They are just bullies. They like to pick on people who can't answer back. A woman I know with a cafe says she has had one woman coming in for years who just complains about everything all the time. But she still keeps coming!
 

Lord Lucan

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They are just bullies. They like to pick on people who can't answer back. A woman I know with a cafe says she has had one woman coming in for years who just complains about everything all the time. But she still keeps coming!
My wife and I owned a cafe around 10 years ago. We had a customer just like that. One we'd had enough of when she complained rudely to one of our staff that her toast (the same toast from the same supplier that she ate 3 times a week) was too thick. We told her to piss off and never set foot in the door again. The mind blowing thing was that she was a retired High Court judge. You'd think she'd have known better.
 
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escargot

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My wife and I owned a cafe around 10 years ago. We had a customer just liked that. One we'd had enough when she complained rudely to one of our staff that her toast (the same toast from the same supplier that she ate 3 times a week) was too thick. We told her to piss off and never set foot in the door again. The mind blowing thing was that she was a retired High Court judge. You'd think she'd have known better.
Reminds me of one of the dog walkers I got to know in our local woods who was a retired court prosecutor. The convention was to amble around chatting about this and that while the dogs entertained themselves running round together and chasing squirrels.

However, Mrs Prosecutor would present every opinion she held, such as the possibility of rain or the quality of the cakes in the cafe, as a fully-reasoned argument. Anyone disagreeing was WRONG and would be verbally flattened.

I'd get her to pronounce on ridiculous subjects like whether shops should sell shoes individually to help customers with odd-sized feet and she'd instantly take a side and launch into a diatribe. She never stopped pushing her views, however trivial, and reminded me of Father William -

"In my youth," said his father, "I took to the law,
And argued each case with my wife;
And the muscular strength, which it gave to my jaw,
Has lasted the rest of my life.
"

Eventually she backed herself into a corner when the council announced a plan to build a proper tarmac path around the woods to improve accessibility. She was dead against this desecration of ancient woodland and declared she'd never go there again if this came about.

The path was indeed laid, and very helpful it is too, especially to the more elderly users. Absolutely ideal.

But as I'd reminded Mrs Prosecutor every time we met about her threat to boycott the place, usually loudly in front of others, she wouldn't climb down gracefully and enjoy the path. Instead she found somewhere else to walk her dog. Sad really.
 

Stormkhan

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But as I'd reminded Mrs Prosecutor every time we met about her threat to boycott the place, usually loudly in front of others, she wouldn't climb down gracefully and enjoy the path. Instead she found somewhere else to walk her dog. Sad really.
The privileged desperately clinging to a privilege in the face of fact or reason.
 

EnolaGaia

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From the Dumbass Design desk in our WTF Were You Thinking bureau ...
Hasbro pulls Trolls doll after complaints it promotes child abuse

Toymaker Hasbro said Wednesday that it’s in the process of removing the “Trolls World Tour Giggle and Sing Poppy” from the market and will be offering customers a replacement doll of the popular female character. ...

The doll had been designed to giggle when placed in a sitting position, but some parents complain the sound activation button is inappropriately placed under the doll's skirt and between her legs.

An online petition suggests the doll is "conditioning our children to think pedophilia is OK.”

“This is not okay for a child’s toy! This toy needs to be removed from our stores," the petition by Jessica McManis reads in part. "What will this toy make our innocent, impressionable children think? That it’s fun when someone touches your private area?" ...

Hasbro spokeswoman Julie Duffy told The Providence Journal that the Rhode Island-based company recognizes the sensor's placement “may be perceived as inappropriate.”

“This was not intentional and we are happy to provide consumers with a replacement Poppy doll of similar value through our consumer care team," she told the newspaper. "We are in the process of removing the item for purchase.” ...
FULL STORY: https://www.wcvb.com/article/hasbro...r-complaints-it-promotes-child-abuse/33532879
 

Tigerhawk

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Returning home on the bus from an afternoon of book shopping when I overheard a conversation between two passengers -
Male - Do I know you?
Female - I don't know you, so no.
Male - Would you like to? Unless you have a boyfriend?
Female - No, I am not interested.
Male - Okay then...

I didn't think people tried to chat up people on public transport....
 

Iris

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There's not a lot of other places to meet at the moment with pubs and clubs I either limited or just shut as it is here.
One of my granddaughters having broken up with her boyfriend has found another who is the best friend of her friend's boyfriend.
He can't visit her at the moment though as he's more than 5 kilometres away.
 

escargot

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Returning home on the bus from an afternoon of book shopping when I overheard a conversation between two passengers -
Male - Do I know you?
Female - I don't know you, so no.
Male - Would you like to? Unless you have a boyfriend?
Female - No, I am not interested.
Male - Okay then...

I didn't think people tried to chat up people on public transport....
You've had a sheltered life! :rollingw:
 

Sgt Girth

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Chatting up girls was tricky enough when I was a young lad....it seems to be an absolute nightmare nowadays where you run the risk of being sued for the most innocuous of comments! That said, the exchange on the bus seems pretty amicable.
 
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