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Things That Make You Go... WTF?

Ogdred Weary

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Ok so when people above said "Irish" they mean Irish/Gaelige? Are the P and Q labels related to how the various languages pronounce a particular sound? And - the Irish we know of as Irish speaking Gaelic immigrated from the Scandinavian countries, and of course subjugated, intermarried, etc. Does this mean that the Celtic languages are related to early Scandinavian langages? Come to think of it , the Gaelics appear to have followed the Vikings.
I have no idea what "people" "above" meant by anything.

I was simply pointing out that not all extant Celtic languages were "Gaelic".

"The Irish we know of as Irish speaking Gaelic immigrated from the Scandinavian countries, and of course subjugated, intermarried, etc. Does this mean that the Celtic languages are related to early Scandinavian langages? Come to think of it , the Gaelics appear to have followed the Vikings."

The "Irish" or "Irish-ish" Celts were Scandinavian? What are you saying?

The Celtic languages predate any Scandinavian languages in Britain and Ireland and may well predate those languages in Scandinavia.

Yes the Q-Celtic group come from "C" or "cuh" phenome at the the start of words and the P-Celtic group from "B" or "buh" sounds as well as "P" or "puh" sounds. Why the wrong letters for the sounds? Ask academics.
 

JaneD

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I have no idea what "people" "above" meant by anything.

I was simply pointing out that not all extant Celtic languages were "Gaelic".

"The Irish we know of as Irish speaking Gaelic immigrated from the Scandinavian countries, and of course subjugated, intermarried, etc. Does this mean that the Celtic languages are related to early Scandinavian langages? Come to think of it , the Gaelics appear to have followed the Vikings."

The "Irish" or "Irish-ish" Celts were Scandinavian? What are you saying?

The Celtic languages predate any Scandinavian languages in Britain and Ireland and may well predate those languages in Scandinavia.

Yes the Q-Celtic group come from "C" or "cuh" phenome at the the start of words and the P-Celtic group from "B" or "buh" sounds as well as "P" or "puh" sounds. Why the wrong letters for the sounds? Ask academics.
Think mac for Q celtic and ap for P celtic
 

Ogdred Weary

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Think mac for Q celtic and ap for P celtic
Good point. Does it relate to that? I thought it was sounds at the beginning of words? Though that is likely correct: the "ap" in Welsh is pronounced "ab", no idea why and I don't think "p" is ever a "b" sound anywhere else in Welsh. I don't know of an "ap" equivalent in Cornish or Breton.
 

Frideswide

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That's Irish Gaelic. Scottish Gaelic is pronounced 'Ga-lic'.
or in my case: soddingdamnbollockingHELL!

I did a course. Struggled but did reasonably ok on the written stuff.

Can I say it? come over here and I'll slap that stupidity out of you

Can I relate the words on the page to some consistent set of noises? soddingdamnbollockingHELL! :frust:
 

catseye

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I do like the chocolate covered marzipan bars

View attachment 38260
That is food of the gods! My friend gave me a huge bar of this two Christmases ago. I left it in a bag in the living room and the terrier (who has never before or since stolen food) took it out of the bag, chewed the wrapper up and buried the slimy, uneaten remains of the bar behind the sofa cushions. No, she didn't eat the chocolate. Or the marzipan. Just slobbered all over it, presumably found it inedible, and then buried it. So I had the double whammy of first of all worrying that she'd eaten it and needed to go to the vet, then finding it uneaten but uneatable by me!

The fact that it was stuck to the sofa cushions didn't even register as being worth cursing about. I still haven't forgiven the little bugger.
 

Kondoru

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Can I relate the words on the page to some consistent set of noises? soddingdamnbollockingHELL! :frust:
Pronunciation? Whats that? I just say what I see on the page.

I can use the word, I can spell it...

Who cares if I can say it?

(I love Marzipan too)
 

WeeScottishLassie

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That is food of the gods! My friend gave me a huge bar of this two Christmases ago. I left it in a bag in the living room and the terrier (who has never before or since stolen food) took it out of the bag, chewed the wrapper up and buried the slimy, uneaten remains of the bar behind the sofa cushions. No, she didn't eat the chocolate. Or the marzipan. Just slobbered all over it, presumably found it inedible, and then buried it. So I had the double whammy of first of all worrying that she'd eaten it and needed to go to the vet, then finding it uneaten but uneatable by me!

The fact that it was stuck to the sofa cushions didn't even register as being worth cursing about. I still haven't forgiven the little bugger.
That reminds me of when I thought one of my sausage dogs had suddenly developed a lump in her mouth.

I nearly had a heart attack and thought I was going to have to rush her to the vet.

Thankfully after poking it a bit, a chunk of broccoli fell out that I'd fed her earlier.

Seems like she wasn't too impressed with broccoli either but thank goodness because imagine the embarrassment if I'd taken her and it fell out in front of the vet.

I love my dogs but they cause me so much worry!
 

maximus otter

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or in my case: soddingdamnbollockingHELL!

I did a course. Struggled but did reasonably ok on the written stuff.

Can I say it? come over here and I'll slap that stupidity out of you

Can I relate the words on the page to some consistent set of noises? soddingdamnbollockingHELL! :frust:


;)

maximus otter
 

CALGACUS03

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I, like JaneD, (above) studied at the School of Scottish Studies in Edinburgh, as well as spending a nightmare year (trying) studying Gaelic at Edinburgh University when I was doing my degree.
I rememember being told that the p-Celtic and q-Celtic terms for the language groups derive from the way in which similar words between the two languages are pronounced.

Thus p-Celtic (Brythonic) (e.g. Cornish, Breton or Welsh) has: penn meaning 'head' or 'end'

and

q-Celtic (Goidelic) (e.g. Irish or Scottish Gaelic or Manx) has ce(a)nn meaning 'head' or 'end'.

There's an interesting Open University page here about the two branches of the language.

The Picts and Britons who inhabited most of what is now Scotland, until supplanted by the Scots, spoke p-Celtic, and there are still placenames that survive today that demonstrate this e.g. Penmanshiel, Penicuik, etc.
 

catseye

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Wait it's still alive? It lived?
She's still with me. Honestly, she never EVER touches food, you can happily leave a sandwich and go away to come back and find it untouched. I have no idea why she pulled this from my bag only to decide that it was nasty.

She's saved by being cute.
 

Mythopoeika

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I, like JaneD, (above) studied at the School of Scottish Studies in Edinburgh, as well as spending a nightmare year (trying) studying Gaelic at Edinburgh University when I was doing my degree.
I rememember being told that the p-Celtic and q-Celtic terms for the language groups derive from the way in which similar words between the two languages are pronounced.

Thus p-Celtic (Brythonic) (e.g. Cornish, Breton or Welsh) has: penn meaning 'head' or 'end'

and

q-Celtic (Goidelic) (e.g. Irish or Scottish Gaelic or Manx) has ce(a)nn meaning 'head' or 'end'.

There's an interesting Open University page here about the two branches of the language.

The Picts and Britons who inhabited most of what is now Scotland, until supplanted by the Scots, spoke p-Celtic, and there are still placenames that survive today that demonstrate this e.g. Penmanshiel, Penicuik, etc.
Now I know why I didn't study languages.
 

Stormkhan

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Haven't you seen the really great (and not well known) crime thriller called Dad Savage? I got it (on a whim) from a video store on VHS.

Wow!
I mean wow!

Set in the (really) wilds of Norfolk, Stewart plays the head of a family and big fan of cowboys and line-dancing. He's also retired from a life of crime with a vast quantity of money from his organisation (drugs, extortion, sex etc.) and now produces tulips commercially.
The film starts with a huge 4WD crash into a deserted farmhouse, dropping through into the cellar. Nearly everything after that is shown as flashbacks ... with everyone being scared of what "Dad" Savage is going to do if he finds out!
Very weird, pacing is poor ... but absolutely fascinating. Those in Cromer might find inspiration.
 

CALGACUS03

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Man gets child off of rail track with train bearing down on them. Not all heroes wear a cape once again.

On Camera, Child's Rescue As He Loses Balance Near Train Tracks - YouTube
Bloody hell! It almost looked like the person accompanying the child "walked" them off the edge of the platform! Then, when the child was trying to get back on to the platform as the train bore down, they weren't doing anything to help them - just crouching down, beckoning for the child to climb back up. They could have grabbed the child's arm and lifted them up on to the platform quite easily.

1618993707269.png

Ah, okay - scratched the above; apparently (according to the comments under the YouTube video), the child's mother is blind. My bad! :( I'll leave this comment in case anyone else thinks like I did. Apologies. :sorry:
 

Swifty

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Bloody hell! It almost looked like the person accompanying the child "walked" them off the edge of the platform! Then, when the child was trying to get back on to the platform as the train bore down, they weren't doing anything to help them - just crouching down, beckoning for the child to climb back up. They could have grabbed the child's arm and lifted them up on to the platform quite easily.

View attachment 38390

Ah, okay - scratched the above; apparently (according to the comments under the YouTube video), the child's mother is blind. My bad! :( I'll leave this comment in case anyone else thinks like I did. Apologies. :sorry:
My bad mate, I should have mentioned she was blind in my post but I forgot.

I like to think that bloke got back home that day and his Mrs shouted at him ".. and you STILL haven't taken the green bin out!!"
 

CALGACUS03

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My bad mate, I should have mentioned she was blind in my post but I forgot.
No problem at all, :) I should have read the background before I started commenting. I could have just not posted - but thought it might prevent someone else making the same mistake that I did.
 
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