Things That Make You Go... WTF?

ramonmercado

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In the RoI Cavan people are reputed to be mean, in NI it's Ballymena people. The real gallows humour of NI comes into play:

Did you hear about the Ballymena man who was depressed?
He went next door to gas himself.

Now I've suffered from depression and tried to commit suicide but there's something odd in that which could make me laugh.
 

escargot

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They used to call Crewe-ites 'Chip eaters'. Having just moved there, I once asked someone why that was and they said ''because they like eating chips''.
I never found out whether they really did eat them more than anyone else. I suspect it was Stoke lot who gave them this nickname in revenge for 'Clayhead'.
I've never been called a Chip-Eater or even heard of that nickname before!

We do call Stokies 'Jugheads' and 'Juggers' though.
 

Floyd1

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It's not sharp though is it! :chuckle:
I think the British have always been known for 'taking the mik' not only out of each other but themselves too.
We've got 'Southern softies' Trevp, maximus and Nosmo, 'Tight Northerners' PeteS, catseye, and then the decent ones in the middle. :chuckle:

I once worked at a place where the lads said ''so and so is a miserable git'' or words to that effect. I got talking to him one day (he was from Eastern Europe way somewhere) and he told me that in his country, to laugh at yourself was considered a 'weakness'.
 

escargot

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I once worked at a place where the lads said ''so and so is a miserable git'' or words to that effect. I got talking to him one day (he was from Eastern Europe way somewhere) and he told me that in his country, to laugh at yourself was considered a 'weakness'.
Can remember when that was more the case here too.
As I recall, it changed when the alternative comedians came along in the'80s. Before that people generally wouldn't tell a funny story about themselves, whereas afterwards they did.

Have to admit that I admire people who laughingly describe how they've dropped themselves in it and I hugely enjoy recounting my own disasters for humorous effect.

It's about dumping the ego. :wink2:
 

Floyd1

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Can remember when that was more the case here too.
As I recall, it changed when the alternative comedians came along in the'80s. Before that people generally wouldn't tell a funny story about themselves, whereas afterwards they did.

Have to admit that I admire people who laughingly describe how they've dropped themselves in it and I hugely enjoy recounting my own disasters for humorous effect.

It's about dumping the ego. :wink2:
That's interesting. I didn't realise that. I always assumed/presumed it had been a British trait for a long time.
 

Cochise

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I'm not going there. Had a big argument with someone over Hendrix's Hey Joe. It's a song. Can't you make a song about bad things? The fact that I can play the bass line has nothing to do with it.

I'm getting so much saccharine off feely good people that it's making me ill. The world can be cruel and nasty and art needs to reflect that as much as the good things. Indeed, if we want equality, given how nasty the world actually is, there's is nowhere near enough art about the cruel side of life.
 

Floyd1

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I'm not going there. Had a big argument with someone over Hendrix's Hey Joe. It's a song. Can't you make a song about bad things? The fact that I can play the bass line has nothing to do with it.

I'm getting so much saccharine off feely good people that it's making me ill. The world can be cruel and nasty and art needs to reflect that as much as the good things. Indeed, if we want equality, given how nasty the world actually is, there's is nowhere near enough art about the cruel side of life.
Agreed. But what makes it even worse is, as Keef says;

he was confused by people who wanted to "bury" the track.
"Didn't they understand this was a song about the horrors of slavery?"
 

Nosmo King

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I'm not going there. Had a big argument with someone over Hendrix's Hey Joe. It's a song. Can't you make a song about bad things? The fact that I can play the bass line has nothing to do with it.

I'm getting so much saccharine off feely good people that it's making me ill. The world can be cruel and nasty and art needs to reflect that as much as the good things. Indeed, if we want equality, given how nasty the world actually is, there's is nowhere near enough art about the cruel side of life.
Sonic Boom - Angel

 

Cochise

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I think if you forget something obvious, it a senior moment, if you say or do something stupid, it's a blonde moment
That's a splendidly clear explanation. :twothumbs:

My confusion is banished.

Have you considered a job writing instruction manuals? If it was 20 years ago I'd have offered you one :)
 

escargot

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I'm old enough to remember hearing that song on its first release and as usual being puzzled by it.
Needless to say I got the meaning totally wrong.

The only lines I could make out were:

- Sold in the market down in New Orleans,

- Brown Sugar, how come you dance so good?


and

- Brown Sugar, how come you taste so good
Brown Sugar, just like a young girl should


So being a young girl of 12/13 at the time whose family often enjoyed home-baked cakes made with what seemed like exotic ingredients, I concluded that the song was about buying Demerara sugar for home consumption.

I imagined a young girl like my myself being sent to market by her mother for cake ingredients and tasting a little of the brown sugar, and dancing for joy on the way home.

It honestly never crossed my mind until a few years ago that all this wasn't the case.
When there was public discussion about the song's lyrics relating to slavery and so on I thought 'old on, 'old on, it's not about shopping? What? :omg:
 

Floyd1

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I'm old enough to remember hearing that song on its first release and as usual being puzzled by it.
Needless to say I got the meaning totally wrong.

The only lines I could make out were:

- Sold in the market down in New Orleans,

- Brown Sugar, how come you dance so good?


and

- Brown Sugar, how come you taste so good
Brown Sugar, just like a young girl should


So being a young girl of 12/13 at the time whose family often enjoyed home-baked cakes made with what seemed like exotic ingredients, I concluded that the song was about buying Demerara sugar for home consumption.

I imagined a young girl like my myself being sent to market by her mother for cake ingredients and tasting a little of the brown sugar, and dancing for joy on the way home.

It honestly never crossed my mind until a few years ago that all this wasn't the case.
When there was public discussion about the song's lyrics relating to slavery and so on I thought 'old on, 'old on, it's not about shopping? What? :omg:
It's all about food with you isn't it! (Me too actually).
 

Yithian

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The boss's daughter at a place I used to work often said that about herself when she'd made a mistake or done something she considered stupid or daft.

I have an old school friend with fiery red hair and a wonderfully stubborn nature.

I'm not saying that one is a cause of the other, but whenever the latter would come to the fore and he'd dig his heels in unreasonably, his other friends and I would explain the matter in terms of his 'being ginger' again:

Isn't X coming this evening?
No, he'd rather sit at home and be ginger.

Have you spoken to X about this?
There's no point; he's far too ginger to admit that he got it wrong.

Etc.


Spoke to him earlier today as it happens; age hath not mellowed him!
 

escargot

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I bet he was a damn fine chap really wasn't he?
Great dress sense too.

prisoner.jpeg
 

gordonrutter

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I think the British have always been known for 'taking the mik' not only out of each other but themselves too.
We've got 'Southern softies' Trevp, maximus and Nosmo, 'Tight Northerners' PeteS, catseye, and then the decent ones in the middle. :chuckle:

I once worked at a place where the lads said ''so and so is a miserable git'' or words to that effect. I got talking to him one day (he was from Eastern Europe way somewhere) and he told me that in his country, to laugh at yourself was considered a 'weakness'.
Northeners?
 

gordonrutter

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I'm old enough to remember hearing that song on its first release and as usual being puzzled by it.
Needless to say I got the meaning totally wrong.

The only lines I could make out were:

- Sold in the market down in New Orleans,

- Brown Sugar, how come you dance so good?


and

- Brown Sugar, how come you taste so good
Brown Sugar, just like a young girl should


So being a young girl of 12/13 at the time whose family often enjoyed home-baked cakes made with what seemed like exotic ingredients, I concluded that the song was about buying Demerara sugar for home consumption.

I imagined a young girl like my myself being sent to market by her mother for cake ingredients and tasting a little of the brown sugar, and dancing for joy on the way home.

It honestly never crossed my mind until a few years ago that all this wasn't the case.
When there was public discussion about the song's lyrics relating to slavery and so on I thought 'old on, 'old on, it's not about shopping? What? :omg:
Erm, Brown Sugar is about slavery, ok. Learn something new every day.
 

escargot

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Erm, Brown Sugar is about slavery, ok. Learn something new every day.

The first verse goes:

Gold Coast slave ship bound for cotton fields
Sold in the market down in New Orleans
Skydog slaver knows he's doin' all right
Hear him whip the women just around midnight


It's not just slavery, it's sex, whipping and other enthralling subjects. Like a stream of consciousness composition based around what Jagger imagined went on.
 

gordonrutter

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The first verse goes:

Gold Coast slave ship bound for cotton fields
Sold in the market down in New Orleans
Skydog slaver knows he's doin' all right
Hear him whip the women just around midnight


It's not just slavery, it's sex, whipping and other enthralling subjects. Like a stream of consciousness composition based around what Jagger imagined went on.
Thanks. Only really vaguely know the chorus, would not have been able to give many words from any of the verses!
 

GNC

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Jagger could have kept singing it in his ridiculous "blues" voice and none of us would be any the wiser.
 
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