Thinking Of Visiting Australia?

GNC

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I wonder if Australia will still be inhabitable for humans in a few decades' time? Big parts of it, anyway.
 

Iris

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If the excess water was able to be channelled to drier parts it would lessen the impact of droughts.
On the other hand if the monsoonal rains keep hammering Queensland regularly maybe we will have an inland sea again and the fresh water would mean we could support a much larger population.
 
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If the excess water was able to be channelled to drier parts
It is certainly possible and would be a massive engineering triumph if the idiots in charge could have a bit of vision. Got Buckley's with the incumbent twats mismanaging the infrastructure. In fact there has been an endless round of thickheads fucking up the water system here since day dot. Drown them all!! Oh we have no water left.

Burn them all!!
 

Mungoman

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I listen to cricket on BBC Radio - most recently the Big Bash and the Australia/Sri Lanka Test.

It has been striking, perturbing and salutory to hear the news reports with the drought and floods next to each other :(

It's sort of normal for Country kids who rely on tank water for washing, drinking &c. - this drought and flood thing. My oldest was 3 before She saw her first rain, ( Faith thought that the sky was crying) and the youngest has just put in a 210,000 litre rain water tank at her place...The ones who need an education are the 15 million who live within 80 kilometres of the Eastern coast who drive every morning to work in aircon, work in aircon, drive back home in aircon, then sleep in airconditioned residences, and who think that 35 degrees is hot.

Unfortunately, they determine rural outcomes, prodded on by their Lobbyists, while bush people have to put up with their errors of judgement. IMG_0293.jpg

This is part of the Kosciosko national park - three years on after one of the hottest conflagrations ever known. It travelled that fast that even small branches were left intact, but the temperature of the fires were that intense that these hundreds of thousands of hectares of trees that normally have epicormic growth and lignotuber growth after bushfires are dead - this is normally snow country, and these Eucalypt are used to extremes like fire and ice - but they died after the last fire. I drove for maybe twenty kilometres through this.

We (country people) wanted slow wet burns in the tail end of winter/early spring when the majority of arboreals are waking up, and they haven't got Younguns, when the fires would be much cooler and slower. We also want cattle to graze up there in the more ambient times of the year to keep the grass down.

It's not going to happen - instead they'll send volunteer firemen and women up there to try to control theses conflagrations when it happens again, and laud praise on them for their unstinting work that these fellas do.

Floods...well, they're the other side of the coin - until you realise that the majority of damage done is when they open the floodgates on the dams to release the over excessive capacity that could be pumped inland to the tablelands dams - which supply the inland river systems.

Not interested - but they'll pull down a football stadium that's 30 years old and build another one at the cost of $730,000,000.

Sorry for my Curmudgeonly ways Possum - I'll get off of my soapbox now.
 

Anome

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It is certainly possible and would be a massive engineering triumph if the idiots in charge could have a bit of vision. Got Buckley's with the incumbent twats mismanaging the infrastructure. In fact there has been an endless round of thickheads fucking up the water system here since day dot. Drown them all!! Oh we have no water left.

Burn them all!!
Actually, I'd rather they stopped messing with the flow of the Murray-Darling basin, and let it go back to the natural course. Even the Snowy Hydroelectric Scheme is problematic, but seems to do OK as long as they flush it out periodically. There have been calls from some of the less rational radio hosts and media commentators to "turn the rivers inland" and pump all of our water into agricultural land that some genius decided to establish in the middle of a desert, or at least grassland that doesn't get regular rain. All this agricultural messing about is why Goulburn had to have water trucked in a few years back, they'd overloaded the natural water resources.
 

Mungoman

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Actually, I'd rather they stopped messing with the flow of the Murray-Darling basin, and let it go back to the natural course. Even the Snowy Hydroelectric Scheme is problematic, but seems to do OK as long as they flush it out periodically. There have been calls from some of the less rational radio hosts and media commentators to "turn the rivers inland" and pump all of our water into agricultural land that some genius decided to establish in the middle of a desert, or at least grassland that doesn't get regular rain. All this agricultural messing about is why Goulburn had to have water trucked in a few years back, they'd overloaded the natural water resources.

I've been living on and off in Goulburn since 1969, and I don't remember that Anome - must've been quite a few years back

They had the water pipe constructed (2009) that brought their water from Moss Vale (80 K's), back to Goulburn because the Sydney water authority didn't like the fact that Goulburn's unmetered water supply slipped gently through the town...

They are mainly a Grazing area with sheep and cattle - could the problem have been with the Goulburn Valley in Victoria?
 

Anome

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I've been living on and off in Goulburn since 1969, and I don't remember that Anome - must've been quite a few years back

They had the water pipe constructed (2009) that brought their water from Moss Vale (80 K's), back to Goulburn because the Sydney water authority didn't like the fact that Goulburn's unmetered water supply slipped gently through the town...

They are mainly a Grazing area with sheep and cattle - could the problem have been with the Goulburn Valley in Victoria?
A quick search shows 2005. They might not have gotten to trucking water in, but the dam was down to 10% and they were facing severe restrictions.
 

hunck

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"Up to 500,000 cattle die in Queensland floods"

In north-west Queensland it hadn’t rained, any decent rain, for more than five years.
When the downpour finally came last week, graziers were elated. Now it’s feared up to 500,000 cattle, mostly from severely drought-stressed herds, have been killed in widespread flood waters.

At Eddington station near Julia Creek in western Queensland, Rachael Anderson says she lost about 2,000 cattle, roughly half the station’s herd. Farmers know recovering from such stock losses will put them under severe financial stress.
“I can provide for my family right now,” Anderson said. “But in six months’ time or when the bank comes for their repayment, I don’t know what I’m going to do, none of us know what we are going to do.

“We can’t get loans because we’ve got nothing to borrow against, none of us have got anything left. I’m not going to lie, it will finish some people up, but others will be rebuilding.”

The speed and intensity of the unfolding tragedy makes it hard to believe that it’s just a week since farmers’ elation at receiving the first decent rains in five years turned to horror at the devastating and unprecedented flood that quickly followed.

the full extent of livestock losses would not be known until the water fully recedes, but some estimates put losses up to 500,000 out of 10.5m head of cattle in Queensland.
 

Lord Lucan

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Lot of dust in the air round here this afternoon. Everything looked kind of brown.
Here too (Southern Highlands, NSW). The pic below was taken from my driveway around 5 this afternoon. The sky was a pinkish/sandy colour. I don't think the image quite does the colour justice. Just yesterday, the sky was crystal clear and as blue as can be without a cloud in the sky. You can taste the dust as well. Not good for the asthmatics and sinus sufferers.
duststorm.jpg
 

Lord Lucan

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Indeed. A bitch and a bastard. We've all had a taste of the brute to come, everywhere. Even the Huon Valley in Tassie has roasted and flamed up.
I fear it's all ahead of us, chaps and chapesses. We'll be underground in half a decade. Mark my words.
 

Mungoman

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Indeed. A bitch and a bastard. We've all had a taste of the brute to come, everywhere. Even the Huon Valley in Tassie has roasted and flamed up.
I fear it's all ahead of us, chaps and chapesses. We'll be underground in half a decade. Mark my words.
That's a fair idea Skinny - it makes sense to me.
 

hunck

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More on the Queensland grief, from a cattle farmer.

Horrific.

Our cattle have been in a significant supplement feeding program, having withstood the last seven years of relative drought. As a result of this our girls were in great condition and we were seeing the beginning of another exceptional crop of calves. Almost overnight we have transitioned from relative drought years to a flood disaster zone. No amount of preparation could have readied our herd for the relentless driving rain and near gale-force winds they had to endure.

On day eight the creek by our houses had dropped and slowed just enough for Robert and Kate to swim across and check on some cows close by. The heartbreaking scene they were confronted with on the other side very quickly turned our fears into the horrific nightmare that not only our family but our extended family, the whole of the north-west, are now battling with. It is unfathomable that our ladies in such a short period of time have lost roughly an incredibly 50% of their body weight. The survivors are a mere shadow of the strong healthy animals they were only a fortnight ago.

As we begin to access our paddocks we are being confronted with death and devastation at every turn. There are kangaroos dead in trees and fences, birds drowned in drifts of silt and debris and our beloved bovine family lay perished in piles where they have been huddling for protection and warmth. This scene is mirrored across the entire region, it is absolutely soul-destroying to think our animals suffered like this.
 

Lord Lucan

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This is just heartbreaking, and not the only instance either. This truly is the land of extremes.
 

Mungoman

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Seriously though, Australia is a land of 7,692,000 square kilometres that has 5% of it that is capable of being utilised for agriculture. According to the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM), "80% of the land receives less than 600mm (24 in) of rainfall annually and 50% has even less than 300 mm (12 in). As a whole, Australia has a very low annual average rainfall of 419 mm (16 in). "

It has an annual transevaporation rate that ranges from 1100mm (Melbourne), to 2100mm (Darwin) - in comparison, England has an annual average transevaporation rate of 300mm (.https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/7d63/319d2493ce3cb20b51fc009d3e34b64fbfe7.pdf) It is consistent in it's droughts and floods, and it's Flora has adapted to a consistent regime of seasonal conflagration, to the extent that complete species will fail to propagate unless charred by fire.

It's soil is so deficient in Potassium that the majority of Flora will die if given a European dose of NPK fertiliser.

The majority of this soil is also inherently Sodolic that European flora cannot grow here.

It's fauna has adapted to these conditions to the extent that their breeding cycles are reliant upon rain, and in drought their embryo's will go into stasis and stop growing.

It is a phenomenally wondrous country...but it has a complete disregard for soft bairns, and in consequence, it will dismissively kill you out of hand. (Pardon the anthropomorphism.)
 

Lord Lucan

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Back to something not so serious, here's a tongue in cheek tourism video made for Australia. It's produced by a Kiwi, but as we have great affection for our less fortunate cousins across the Tasman, we'll forgive him for indiscretions. Incidentally, read the YouTube comments, they're hilarious (for Australians at least).
 

Mungoman

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Back to something not so serious, here's a tongue in cheek tourism video made for Australia. It's produced by a Kiwi, but as we have great affection for our less fortunate cousins across the Tasman, we'll forgive him for indiscretions. Incidentally, read the YouTube comments, they're hilarious (for Australians at least).

Problems with QLD?

Queenslanders. The rest is all good. Eh.
 

Mungoman

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While Queensland is lovely, it's the humidity I cannot stand, which is why it's best to visit in winter....
I spent some time in Broome and even though the Temperature was only 33, the humidity was cruel - everything chafed...and I do mean everything.

One of the advantages of living out on the western plains is that 8% humidity is normal which allows me to deal with temps of 48 (haven't cracked 50 yet). It's no wonder we have droughts though - as soon as precipitation hits the ground it evaporates. Seriously.

The oddest thing is watching the rain fall, and the roads steam - I'll have to get a photo but we've only had 6 1/2 inches since November 2017, so it might take a while.

I'll keep youse posted...
 
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