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Thylacines (Tasmanian Tiger / Wolf): Misc.

oldrover

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Good find makes fascinating listening. I was just thinking the other day whether there was anyone left who had regular contact with it.

Interesting that he says he thinks the animal was put down, although as he says that was just an impression of his. What's more interesting is that he says he remembers it as being in good health, especially as after it died the skin wasn't preserved because of its poor condition.

Also of course the Washington pair never bred, that's only known to have happened once in captivity and that was at Melbourne Zoo.

The Westbury Zoo animal needs a bit of looking into though.
 

oldrover

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In fact 2013 has been a good year for thylacines so far, this, four preserved pups discovered in Prague and with hopefully a new photo about to surface before long.
 

lordmongrove

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" I was just thinking the other day whether there was anyone left who had regular contact with it."

With a lot of luck, me in November.
 

oldrover

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Well I'd certainly like that to be the case. By the way what do you make of the throw away little comment about there being another animal kept at Westbury Zoo, I'm looking into that one.
 

lordmongrove

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No idea but it would not surprise me. Until recently zoo records in most collections have been wanting.
Wombwell's Travling Menagery once exhibited things they called tiger wolves or zebra wolves. These may have been striped hyenas but they could have been thylacines.
 

oldrover

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In 2012 he spent five weeks on the Apple Isle and has captured footage of what he and others believe are the famed thylacines.

Yet there are others again who think he's a bit of a flange.
 

oldrover

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Incidentally as I sit here seething at the bilge that this spanner has on his website Karl Shuker is on the TV on a re-run of 'Who Wants to be a Millionaire?', he gets his thylacine facts from Wikipedia as well.
 

oldrover

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Child's essay masquerading as an article. Read his background on the contributor's list.

I did call it really weak but I've changed that, it wasn't fair the kid is obviously just enthusiastic. Shame though that his enthusiasm doesn't extent to researching his subjects. The text contains some glaring errors and I'm really not sure why it was published.
 

lordmongrove

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This has actualy been done in Vietnam by Copenhagen University. They found DNA from rare animals like the Annimite rabbit.
 

oldrover

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Fair enough it's a very valid point to raise, my objection is purely to the Tasmanian Geographic link.

Have you read it?
 

oldrover

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I don't think this is a hoax, isn't this thyla-mouse thing that was widely reported a few years ago.
 

lordmongrove

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I had a closer look at the website and its full of patently made up crap.
 

lordmongrove

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Yes, i thought it was ok.
Tom Gilbert does are DNA stuff for free at Copenhagen and Lars Thomas is the hair expert.
 

oldrover

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No sorry, I didn't mean your second link there, somehow I managed to miss that one. I was on about the first one written by the kid.

The second one is very good, and the idea itself is excellent.
 

lordmongrove

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However we saw no leeches in Tasmania. I think it was unseasonably cold when we were there.
 

lordmongrove

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Tigers in The Weld: The Sequel

Col Bailey. First published Sunday April 7
08.04.13 6:30 pm

Into the wild and untamed interior of the alluring Weld Valley

My second book, ‘Shadow of the Thylacine’ - having finally found a publisher - is due for release on May 1st.

And to coincide with its publication, I would like to enlarge on the circumstances surrounding my quest to locate the thylacine in the Weld Valley in March 1995.

Because of overall restrictions regarding word content there was insufficient room to include all details in the book text, and I feel it important to supplement my earlier account to this widely read electronic newspaper with an in-depth narrative of my entry into the south western section of the Weld Valley and that part which borders the South West National Park.

Surprisingly little has been written about this seldom visited part of Tasmania which is remarkable considering its alluring attraction, and as such it deserves commendable recognition. Despite road building and logging having since taken place to the east and north over the past 18 years, this particular area has to this point in time fortunately been spared such intrusion.

The south-western sector of the Weld Valley is one of the least visited tracts of back country in Tasmania, presenting any bushwalker prepared and equipped to tackle it with something of a genuine challenge.

It is blessed with pure, pristine wilderness; extremely remote, largely uncharted and seldom walked. There are no recognised tracks and it can at times be subjected to powerful weather extremes; rain hail, wind, snow and sleet, along with perfectly clear, sunny days thrown in for good measure. To venture into its mysterious depths is to chance whatever nature chooses to throw at you. Once in its clutches you are tempting fate and your life will never be quite the same again. You will rapidly fall under its spell, captivated by its magnificence, breathtaking beauty and enticing allurement to draw you back time and again. Bounded by the Jubilee and Snowy Ranges to the north and the Western Arthurs to the south, this valley of the Weld is a special place; a rare and wild expanse of untainted primordial splendour where it appears time has stood still.

Continued Here:
http://tasmaniantimes.com/index.php/art ... the-sequel
 
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oldrover

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A 'quadrupedal kangaroo', do people ever think before they open their mouths? Do people describe wombats as being kangaroo like? Why not ?They're more closely related.


"One researcher is absolutely adamant that an early group of environmentalists took live tigers to the mainland and let them loose," Black said.

Really? Oh that is good news.

"It’s hard to say what I saw, but some of the sightings are unmistakably Tasmanian tigers," he said.

More good news. Oh well that's that settled then.

What an absolute twat.

Take a look at the book's cover. "what'ya mean wrong sort of tiger?"
 

EnolaGaia

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This thread is being established to house miscellaneous content relating to thylacines (variously labeled as Tasmanian tiger, Tasmanian wolf, or marsupial wolf).
 

catseye

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I've just been catching up with episodes of Extinct on Channel 4. I started watching the episode about thylacines (with some pretty average CGI) but I found it so upsetting I had to turn it off. No idea why, I've watched the Irish Elk and Great Auk episodes without so much as shedding a tear, just a generalised interest. But there was something about the thylacine, maybe it reminded me of my dogs? It was reducing me to tears.
 

lordmongrove

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I've just been catching up with episodes of Extinct on Channel 4. I started watching the episode about thylacines (with some pretty average CGI) but I found it so upsetting I had to turn it off. No idea why, I've watched the Irish Elk and Great Auk episodes without so much as shedding a tear, just a generalised interest. But there was something about the thylacine, maybe it reminded me of my dogs? It was reducing me to tears.

There is a good chance they are still around.
 

Sharon Hill

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There is a good chance they are still around.
Anecdotes and fuzzy pictures constitute "a good chance"? I strongly disagree. That's very wishful thinking when one considers the need for a certain number of individuals to sustain the population these past 100 years, the fact that they were long extinct on mainland Australia by thousands of years and declining in Tasmania when the colonists arrived. I'd say it's an extreme view to say they are still around. False hope (and perhaps deep feelings of guilt) aren't going to bring it back. Maybe cloning will but not for a while and not really. The population is gone.
 

oldrover

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Anecdotes and fuzzy pictures constitute "a good chance"? I strongly disagree. That's very wishful thinking when one considers the need for a certain number of individuals to sustain the population these past 100 years, the fact that they were long extinct on mainland Australia by thousands of years and declining in Tasmania when the colonists arrived. I'd say it's an extreme view to say they are still around. False hope (and perhaps deep feelings of guilt) aren't going to bring it back. Maybe cloning will but not for a while and not really. The population is gone.

Just to clarify, the thylacine population was stable when the Europeans arrived. The big decline came around the turn of the 20th century. With functional extinction occuring then in my opinion.
 

oldrover

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I've just been catching up with episodes of Extinct on Channel 4. I started watching the episode about thylacines (with some pretty average CGI) but I found it so upsetting I had to turn it off. No idea why, I've watched the Irish Elk and Great Auk episodes without so much as shedding a tear, just a generalised interest. But there was something about the thylacine, maybe it reminded me of my dogs? It was reducing me to tears.

The tiger's extinction is tragic, but tjat documentary is not a good description of it. The cgi animal's backstory and condition was totally fabricated. The evidence for disease for example is almost non existent.
 
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