TV & Movie Clichés

Timble2

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People from mediaeval times speak like they are from the age of Shakespeare, a few hundred years later.
Have you ever heard anyone reading Chaucer in an authentic accent? It's a bit like a hybrid of West country, Geordie and Scots. Gawain and the Green Knight is a bit easier on the ear if you treat it as the broadest of Yorkshire accents.
 

Mythopoeika

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Have you ever heard anyone reading Chaucer in an authentic accent? It's a bit like a hybrid of West country, Geordie and Scots. Gawain and the Green Knight is a bit easier on the ear if you treat it as the broadest of Yorkshire accents.
I have. My English teacher was a student of mediaeval English. He read it out to us as it would have been said, then he made us say it.
 

JamesWhitehead

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People from mediaeval times speak like they are from the age of Shakespeare, a few hundred years later.
We need subtitles for Middle English. The language changed massively in the 200 years between Chaucer and Shakespeare. There was a vowel-shift to come, which affected pronunciation but the Bard wrote in Early Modern English.

Pupils whinge about its difficulty, of course, blaming history. They should try Henry James or Joseph Conrad . . . :rolleyes:
 

Kryptonite

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Anyone on tv who has Chinese food will eat it from a small white cardboard box with some red Chinese writing on the side. Despite the small size of this box, it will always contain enough food to satiate the eater, and still have enough left over to be worth storing in the fridge till the next day.
 

EnolaGaia

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Anyone tying shoelaces or putting on shoes in a hurry (e.g., when leaving in a rush) will stand up and hop 2 or 3 times before finishing the act (or else fall down). They never seem to remain seated until the shoes / laces are finalized.
 

Kryptonite

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Women who need to remove their jumper will always do so in that crossed-arm-lifting--from-the-bottom type style.

If alone, this manoeuver will be done facing the camera, however if a gentleman is present, it shall be performed facing him.

Upon completion of the jumper-removal, they will always toss their hair slightly and exhale as though they'd just taken off something itchy and two sizes too small.
 

kamalktk

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That one where the girl comes back home from the big city for the holidays and gets involved with the guy she ignored in high school?

Although personally I much prefer the one where the city girl who tries to have it all ends up in a small town and is smitten by a widower single father.
 

Swifty

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Although personally I much prefer the one where the city girl who tries to have it all ends up in a small town and is smitten by a widower single father.
That would be Jersy Girl then ..
 

ShadyCavalier

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How about radio drama?

You can get Radio 4 dramas on Youtube and BBC Sounds.

I've been listening to old R4 plays and series on YouTube, some going back to the '80s or earlier, and spotted the same cliches over and over. What I mainly noticed is how couples relate to each other.

So you often find the following, in various degrees and order -

- the woman has ideas about what's going on
- the man dismisses her suspicions and openly calls her neurotic/hysterical/irrational
- the woman feels exasperated about this treatment but doesn't challenge his insulting beliefs about her
- the man lays down the law further (stops her working, seeing her friends, driving etc)
- the woman is trapped in some criminal or supernatural dilemma or tricky situation and tries to get help but nobody believes her
- eventually the man realises something's wrong and steps in to save the day
- the woman is grateful that he believes her at last!

It's as if the underlying theme is that yes, women are irrational but when there's a glimmer of truth in their delusions it's up to men to sort it all out.

This reminds me of the plot of
We Need To Talk About Kevin
.
Was one of those radio plays The Doppelganger, perchance?
 

ShadyCavalier

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This plotline cliche has migrated onto contemporary popular fiction (which is how your metioned film began its life).

I've just finished The Party by the bestselling British suspense writer Lisa Hall:

https://www.fishpond.com/Books/Party-Lisa-Hall/9780008259167

This one pretty much goes through point by point the outline you've given above. To be sure, she has tweaked it a bit to give it a post Me Too sensibility (the female protagonist is a rape survivor) - the men don't sort it out, it is not only the hubby who doubts her and so on - but otherwise the similarities are striking.

It's the page turner that it's meant to be - but it's a bit disappointing to learn that it is so formulaic!
So formulaic, in fact, that your description (and the synopsis in that link) Sounds almost identical to The Girl on the Train.
 

SkepticalX

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Then there is the guy who goes crazy only to be brought back to his senses by a glass of water in the face or even a good slap. Afterwards, he will invariably say, "Thanks... I needed that."
 
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