TV & Radio Reminders

hunck

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Can recommend this for those interested in art

Maggi Hambling: Making Love With The Paint

In a definitive and moving film to mark her 75th birthday, artist and national treasure Maggi Hambling tells her story while working on a mysterious black canvas.

Maggi is both a comic extrovert and an intensely private artist, seen parading in a feather boa and fish nets or on television sporting a moustache. But now she mostly prefers the rural Suffolk of her childhood. It is here, for the first time, she has allowed cameras access to her studio

Famously scary and a free spirit, Hambling is celebrated for her intensely moving portraits - the blind boxer Charlie Abrew, the lonely clown Max Wall - her Wave painting and Scallop, her signature sculpture on Aldeburgh beach, commemorating Benjamin Britten.

As her trust in the documentary project grows, Maggi reveals her recent Laugh paintings, exploring her fascination with an expression that seems on the edge of tears. So much of her work finds beauty that is both poignant and unsettling.
on iplayer for a month.
 

Nemo

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BBC R4 tonight 9.30pm.

Start the Week

Human ingenuity and shared inheritance

Amol Rajan explores different ways of thinking, and how far humans can be seen as unique for their ability to invent.

In The Pattern Seekers, Simon Baron-Cohen shows how humans have evolved remarkable ingenuity in every area of their lives – from the arts to the sciences – by using complex systemizing mechanisms. He says this ability to formulate if-and-then processes has driven progress for more than 70,000 years. He goes on to argue that the areas of the brain important for systemizing overlap with those for autism. As the Director of the Autism Research Centre at Cambridge University, Baron-Cohen wants to challenge people to think differently about an often misunderstood condition.

The archaeologist Rebecca Wragg Skyes is also seeking to challenge people’s perceptions. In Kindred: Neanderthal Life, Love, Death and Art, she builds a picture of an ancient ancestor who was far from being a brutish thug. She depicts the Neanderthals as curious and clever connoisseurs of their world: technologically inventive and artistically inclined. Humans may have been the survivors but Wragg Sykes argues that we are not necessarily uniquely special - we share many traits and DNA with our Neanderthal relatives.
(c) BBC. '21
 

hunck

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Winterwatch: 1963 - The Big Freeze

Chris Packham presents BBC prog about the coldest UK winter in 200 years in which the whole country froze. Features archive footage from a beeb prog from the time presented by Cliff Michelmore, of which Ridley Scott was designer.

Power grid couldn't cope, power cuts, solid fuel shortages, roads unpassable with snow etc. It looks at the effect on wildlife where it's estimated about half of UK birds that didn't migrate died.

on iplayer for about a month.
 

GNC

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I was reading Kenneth Williams' diaries, and he often mentions he hates birds, so when there's a big freeze he moans about the cold, but rejoices that lots of birds are dying.
 

escargot

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I was reading Kenneth Williams' diaries, and he often mentions he hates birds, so when there's a big freeze he moans about the cold, but rejoices that lots of birds are dying.
I've read Williams' diaries. He was an all-round miserable twat, and possibly a murderer.
 

escargot

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GNC

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I've read Williams' diaries. He was an all-round miserable twat, and possibly a murderer.
I was tempted to give them a read because I've heard so much about them down the years, they are compelling, but my goodness I was glad to finish them. A lot of his nastiness can be put down to the physical pain he was in throughout his life, but it doesn't excuse it all. The last few years are a countdown to his inevitable suicide, it's that cheery. He was a talented man, but the book reminds you talent doesn't make you a nice guy. Although sometimes the entries are perfectly pleasant and generous. I suppose they call that mercurial.

There was a documentary about him on Channel 5 a couple of weeks ago, to keep it on topic.
 

Stormkhan

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We're leaning into the concept of liking the art but despising the artist?
"Miserable twat" covers being a misogynist, a grumpy git, a manic depressive and all points between.

I admit to being cynical over 'revelations' in personal journals: what is the function of a personal journal? An outlet for really deep emotions? Or are they a form of "desk diary", to be used as notes for future autobiographies? I know, loads of 'ordinary' teenagers keep diaries.* But an 'actor' or a 'wealthy philanthropist' claims that "Oh, yes - I've always kept a diary!", seems to me to say "Oh yes, I always knew I was brilliant!"

It's like a public figure, knowing he was at the bottom of the popularity rung, making do and (honestly) working hard, having the confidence (?) or assurance (?) that they are destined for greater things, and promptly start saying how bad they had it, how noble they are, how absolutely terrible things were that delayed (not stopped them) from being great!

I love reading autobiographies, especially those published while the originator is still alive. The author can be challenged, the 'facts' confronted. The insights gained. My two favourites are "Tall and Gruesome" by Christopher Lee, and "Who's Who?" by Tom Baker.

When it comes to (ah) discovered journals, uncovered (um) letters and only-now-allowed-to-be-published transcripts (er), then I do question the source and it's motive.


* I did myself, for five years - a complete waste of time, they were so boring. That's the trouble with being 'ordinary'. They will not be published.
 

gordonrutter

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We're leaning into the concept of liking the art but despising the artist?
"Miserable twat" covers being a misogynist, a grumpy git, a manic depressive and all points between.

I admit to being cynical over 'revelations' in personal journals: what is the function of a personal journal? An outlet for really deep emotions? Or are they a form of "desk diary", to be used as notes for future autobiographies? I know, loads of 'ordinary' teenagers keep diaries.* But an 'actor' or a 'wealthy philanthropist' claims that "Oh, yes - I've always kept a diary!", seems to me to say "Oh yes, I always knew I was brilliant!"

It's like a public figure, knowing he was at the bottom of the popularity rung, making do and (honestly) working hard, having the confidence (?) or assurance (?) that they are destined for greater things, and promptly start saying how bad they had it, how noble they are, how absolutely terrible things were that delayed (not stopped them) from being great!

I love reading autobiographies, especially those published while the originator is still alive. The author can be challenged, the 'facts' confronted. The insights gained. My two favourites are "Tall and Gruesome" by Christopher Lee, and "Who's Who?" by Tom Baker.

When it comes to (ah) discovered journals, uncovered (um) letters and only-now-allowed-to-be-published transcripts (er), then I do question the source and it's motive.


* I did myself, for five years - a complete waste of time, they were so boring. That's the trouble with being 'ordinary'. They will not be published.
I enjoyed Alec Guinness’s diaries, an entertaining read. I also thought Eddie Hall (former World’s Strongest Man) Had a very effective ghost writer making it all worth reading.
 

GNC

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We're leaning into the concept of liking the art but despising the artist?
"Miserable twat" covers being a misogynist, a grumpy git, a manic depressive and all points between.

I admit to being cynical over 'revelations' in personal journals: what is the function of a personal journal? An outlet for really deep emotions? Or are they a form of "desk diary", to be used as notes for future autobiographies? I know, loads of 'ordinary' teenagers keep diaries.* But an 'actor' or a 'wealthy philanthropist' claims that "Oh, yes - I've always kept a diary!", seems to me to say "Oh yes, I always knew I was brilliant!"

It's like a public figure, knowing he was at the bottom of the popularity rung, making do and (honestly) working hard, having the confidence (?) or assurance (?) that they are destined for greater things, and promptly start saying how bad they had it, how noble they are, how absolutely terrible things were that delayed (not stopped them) from being great!

I love reading autobiographies, especially those published while the originator is still alive. The author can be challenged, the 'facts' confronted. The insights gained. My two favourites are "Tall and Gruesome" by Christopher Lee, and "Who's Who?" by Tom Baker.

When it comes to (ah) discovered journals, uncovered (um) letters and only-now-allowed-to-be-published transcripts (er), then I do question the source and it's motive.


* I did myself, for five years - a complete waste of time, they were so boring. That's the trouble with being 'ordinary'. They will not be published.
Williams kept a diary because he believed he was important, from an early age. He made no secret of it, in fact he would threaten people with writing about them, as if he was exposing the "truth" about them. He completely wanted them to be published, to get his revenge on all the small minds (as he saw them) he was surrounded by. Actually, the small mind he was exposing was his own.

It's weirdly amusing to see the compiler Russell Davies mentioned in the entries, because Williams hated him (and said so) - along with just about everyone else, eventually. It's a very "dark" read, no matter that it makes some people laugh. I didn't laugh much.
 

escargot

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Miserable twat" covers being a misogynist, a grumpy git, a manic depressive and all points between.
Yup, sounds like Williams. His problem, or one of his problems, was that he felt the way he was most successful as an entertainer with the silly voices, camp persona, innuendo etc was below him.

He had started as an actor in repertory theatre and longed to be taken seriously again. Made him bitter. That, and his personal conflict over his sexuality.
 

GNC

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I'll put a reminder here as well as in the Documentaries thread in Chat: Red Penguins, tonight at ten on BBC4, a doc that you have to see to believe. It's not all about Russian ice hockey as it initially seems, it's actually about the whole world going mad. Thoroughly recommended. It'll be on iPlayer too.
 

Bigphoot2

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Coming soon December 22 at 19:00 on BBC1
The Nativity
The Goes Wrong Show: Season 2, Episode 1

The team present their take on the nativity story, generously funded by a corporate sponsor after the BBC refused to pay for any more of the Cornley Dramatic Society's work. As ever, all soon descends into chaos: an ingenious pop-up book set soon proves a physical danger to both cast and crew, the angel Gabriel develops a firework obsession, the actors inside a donkey have a terrible falling out, and there is much more fire than anyone anticipated.

Show: The Goes Wrong Show
Air date: 22 December 2020
 

CarlosTheDJ

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Vardoger

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The Lowe files now on History2 channel, 21;20 CET.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Sci-Fi comedy Moonbase 8 debuts on Sky today:

A couple of laugh out loud moments in 31 minutes wasn't too bad a return I suppose.
Worth a look.
Not strictly speaking sci-fi, as it's set on a moonbase simulation in the desert, but it employs many classic sci-fi themes.
Worth a look.
 

hunck

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I've recommended this before but it's back on Ch 4 player with 19 days left.

Sightseers

A great little movie of love & serial killing on a caravanning tour in the North of England. Ideal christmas tier 4 viewing.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Sci-Fi comedy Moonbase 8 debuts on Sky today:

Hmmm... it's treading a fine line between hilarious and moronic, but I think I'll stick with it.
The scene in ep 2, where they use a haka to speed up donning a spacesuit was so off the wall that it appealed to my sense of humour.
John C Reilley (Holmes and Watson and Stan and Ollie) is a great comedy actor and helps raise the show above the mundane.
 
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ramonmercado

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Hmmm... it's treading a fine line between hilarious and moronic, but I think I'll stick with it.
The scene in ep 2, where they use a haka to speed up donning a spacesuit was so off the wall that it appealed to my sense of humour.
John C Reilley (Holmes and Watson and Stan and Ollie) is a great comedy actor and helps raise the show above the mundane.
Have to admit I'm getting fed up with it. Didn't finish ep 3, not sure if I'll return to it.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Have to admit I'm getting fed up with it. Didn't finish ep 3, not sure if I'll return to it.
Hmmm... see what you mean.
Introducing the irritatingly professional and correct female character rings faint echoes of when Red Dwarf screwed up badly with the third incarnation of Kochanski in series 7.
 
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blessmycottonsocks

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Stick with it Ramon!
Ep. 4 has a wry and amusing swipe at the rivalry between NASA and SpaceX, then ep. 5 starts with a clever plot twist.
 

gordonrutter

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BBC Radio 3 now
Between the Ears
Karin Lehmkuhl Bodony lives in Galena, Interior Alaska, a small native Alaskan village within the Arctic Circle. Karin lives a subsistence lifestyle, close to nature and while doing wildlife studies as an Alaskan national wildlife ranger she spends a lot of time in the wilderness, day and night. Like many Native Alaskans Karin is witnessing how the changing climate is effecting seasons and the natural landscape. As the natural environment visibly changes, the northern lights remain the one constant and because they come from the sun's solar wind, they will always remain. Native Alaskans have used the lights in the night sky to hunt and never fail to be in awe but is their relationship with the lights has not always been a harmonious one. They're a constant in a changing environment, and come from the source which is effecting their way of life, the heat from the sun. Alaskan elders share myths and legends associated with the northern lights. As well as witnessing the Aurora Borealis, Karin also turns the lights into sound. Using a very low frequency radio recorder she takes us deep into the forest on her dog sleigh to capture - in sound- the swirls and whistles generated by the solar shower as it interacts with earth's electromagnetic field. The sounds are as haunting and ethereal as whale song. Karin captures the sounds of the northern lights for a project with the environmental composer Matthew Burtner whose work draws on environmental change in his native Alaska. He uses captured sound and music to reflect environmental change. Matthew listens to the lights out in the Alaskan wilderness for the first time using a very low frequency recorder and uses recordings of the lights to compose a piece of music.

Available on BBC Sounds afterwards
 
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